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Bat Righty or Lefty?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

    personally I think the effect of eye dominance on hitting is nonsense. I think eye dominance usually follows handedness, unless there's a disparity in vision.

    It is interesting to think about someone with little to no prior experience still having a clear difference in ability on each side of the plate, but again that's probably related more to handedness -if you were to kick something or punch something, you would setup similarly with the dominant side as the back side.
    True, it's a fun little experiment and see how the brain works. I played tennis prior to baseball, enough for 2 and 3 years and having to do a one hand backhand reminds me of how a hitter would bat left handed. It was food for thought as I take a look at this since it still makes me scratch my head,

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    • #17
      Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

      personally I think the effect of eye dominance on hitting is nonsense. I think eye dominance usually follows handedness, unless there's a disparity in vision.

      It is interesting to think about someone with little to no prior experience still having a clear difference in ability on each side of the plate, but again that's probably related more to handedness -if you were to kick something or punch something, you would setup similarly with the dominant side as the back side.
      I switch hit. Since I have more reps RH, it is my better side. My left eye is my dominant eye, but my right eye has better vision.

      From what I read/heard, statistically the better batters in the MLB do not have corrective lenses and have near perfect vision. In most cases their dominant eye is beneficial side.

      My confidence side is RH. Ultimately it will come down to confidence for me.

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      • #18
        If an MLB hitter only has 20/20 vision he gets corrective (to 20/12) contacts.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
          If an MLB hitter only has 20/20 vision he gets corrective (to 20/12) contacts.
          why is that? So is the perfect sight then 20/12 for MLB? Odd question - is there laser surgery that corrects it to this?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
            If an MLB hitter only has 20/20 vision he gets corrective (to 20/12) contacts.
            you mean 60/36 vision right?

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            • #21
              Just to revive this thread, I found something that might be a good piece of conversation and not clog up with another new thread.

              My body on the right handed hitter side, requires rotation to power my swing. That means any chance to hit the outside pitch is difficult and my left arm/elbow wants to pull the knob to the baseball. It's a very difficult habit to break and also means I'm losing space and time in my swing to hit the ball unless I'm always out in front. I'm experimenting with different stances to try and get the barrel behind the baseball, will see if this works. You can imagine how doing rotation based hitting is ineffective. I'm still happy from where it is though, considering I had a lot of help over the years reading and gaining guidance from the veterans on the board, but even from my first post, I had a rotational habit ingrained and it's hell to break out of.

              But, on the other hand, on a side I barely put any time and effort in as a lefty, I stay on the line so to speak and not try to pull or push balls. My right leg gets firm, my back side turns, but doesn't rotate extensively, and my barrel gets behind the baseball, creating depth and able to hit wherever the ball is pitched. So there are times I'll hit a bomb oppo towards 2B and other times the ball just carries without thinking too much. My exit velocity off the tee is also equal to my RHH side. I only try to hit the crap out the ball and not focus on a body part.

              Now,I get it, just hit lefty and see what happens, but my question of the day is, do hitters naturally have good tendencies that might get coached out of them? Or is there deficiencies in the human body with certain kids where perhaps, it's something they have to deal with as part of their swing and sand off any holes as they can? Again, Stanton hits rotationally, as a byproduct of his strength and training. It works for him, and is why he needed to use a very closed stance to be effective. Compared to say, Tony Bautista, who's facing 3B before the pitcher is even set and then goes into an open stance. Just food for thought.

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              • #22
                Everything being equal being a lefty is a slight advantage.

                last year mlb ops for lhb was .765 and for the. 752.

                However that advantage isn't huge especially considering the selection bias that lefties are to a larger percentage first basemen and outfielder who tend to hit better.

                So the real advantage might be even lower than those 13 ops points.

                So lefty is a slight advantage especially since you get the better side of the platoon if you are not good enough but more important is that you are good.

                So don't ditch a good righty swing for a bad lefty swing.
                I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by dominik View Post
                  Everything being equal being a lefty is a slight advantage.

                  last year mlb ops for lhb was .765 and for the. 752.

                  However that advantage isn't huge especially considering the selection bias that lefties are to a larger percentage first basemen and outfielder who tend to hit better.

                  So the real advantage might be even lower than those 13 ops points.

                  So lefty is a slight advantage especially since you get the better side of the platoon if you are not good enough but more important is that you are good.

                  So don't ditch a good righty swing for a bad lefty swing.
                  Hey Dom. The only advantage for a lefty in my opinion is that you are closer to 1st base if you're fast and potential cheap homeruns thanks to field dimensions favoring lefties over righties. That being said, one of the reasons I created this thread was a little revelation. I ingrained from past sports habits before picking up baseball. It's how it worked for me and is why I started very rotational. However, rotational hitting has its limits and hard to stop.

                  Coming to a side untouched by any habits/experience as a lefty, was undergoing a lot more checklists of a good swing than me as a righty with little input. Swing stayed in the zone, good barrel path, hit where the ball is pitched, not overly rotational, not working hard to get on time or feel stressed on machines throwing 80+ mph. I know, different on live pitching but it sure got me thinking. Granted, my lefty's side is not quite 1 to 1 in power, but with enough athleticism for the hand-eye coordination to translate and take pitches oppo.

                  I'm trying to unravel all the bad habits and start over on a side where my most dominant hand is my back hand and drive it far. In the meanwhile, I have a good starting point to work off with very little experience and something I just did.

                  My question is, would you teach kids to switch hit just to see if one side is more developed than the other? Or does that go against the grain of typical tradition of, you throw right, you bat right and vice versa?

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                  • #24
                    The advantage of a lefty is that you have the platoon advantage 70% of the time (-in pro ball and 90% in amateur ball).

                    I personally dont teach switch hitting due to time constraints but I think if it is your kid doing a bit of switch hitting (not 50 50 but like a couple swings each session) is good as it fights against the unilateral training of baseball and also helps building up the deceleration muscles and make your body more balanced)
                    Last edited by dominik; Today, 08:10 AM.
                    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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