Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

School Ball/Travel Ball Advice Needed

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    my son is a freshman and at his school they had fall baseball "intramurals" which was strongly suggested for HS baseball prospects (freshman, JV and V). these ran all the way up until nov. i understand there is going to be hitting after school soon, and an after school throwing program starts in january. all well before tryouts in march, all under the guise of "intramurals" or "captain's practices" to get around state rules.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by mistersean View Post
      What does the 12U "Spring Season" consist of where you are? Around here it's practice in the evenings and the odd weekend tournament if weather permits. I guess if you have league games or something it might be an issue, but the fields around here aren't consistently playable enough to schedule a lot of games in the spring. But MS ball barely conflicted with spring travel here, when my son was 12U he had a few of his teammates in MS ball and practice was right after school (no conflict with travel ball practice, which was generally later in the evening). On game days the kids playing MS ball would sometimes show up to practice a little late after home games, or miss on the days they had road games. The coaches were aware of their schedule ahead of time and didn't have any problems accommodating it. MS is a short season, the only real impact I saw was that coaches limited the amount of throwing that the kids playing MS ball did at practice.
      Our spring travel seasons have consisted of league play - usually 12 games, plus playoffs. Some leagues schedule the games as Sunday doubleheaders but invariably there are makeups and those are during the week around 6pm or so. The playoffs spread out during the week and weekends. So there are potential conflicts there. A lot of these leagues use turf fields so field conditions aren't an issue.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by mistersean View Post

        Good point. It's against state rules here for a coach to hold practice outside the season. At my son's HS they have after school weight training and conditioning, but it's open to everybody at the school and the coaches that run it don't bring balls or equipment.
        This may be an issue of semantics - they definitely workout starting after the winter break but it's before tryouts so it's open to everyone. When I played in high school in the 80s, we did the same thing.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by abc123 View Post
          my son is a freshman and at his school they had fall baseball "intramurals" which was strongly suggested for HS baseball prospects (freshman, JV and V). these ran all the way up until nov. i understand there is going to be hitting after school soon, and an after school throwing program starts in january. all well before tryouts in march, all under the guise of "intramurals" or "captain's practices" to get around state rules.
          this is how our HS does it. Aside from a few months off throwing (Nov-Jan), there is a fall throwing and workout, winter hitting league, late winter throwing and workout and early spring scrimmages. These are run by "player captains" and select parents, but not coaches. Rules recently changed, but this is basically what it boils down to.

          For all the talk about HS coaches checking out MS teams, for us, MS sports were a joke and had no bearing on HS. HS coaches could care less and were hardly "grooming" any players for HS ball -this was true for football, basketball, and baseball. We're in a large classification school that is generally pretty competitive, so not sure how HS coaches would have time in season to come to a MS practice or game? That's like them going to a 13/14u TB game? We did have the freshman coaches come to a couple of our 14u practices -but that was mainly to see what we taught and make sure we weren't abusing too many pitchers before they stepped into HS. Coaches had plenty of time evaluating all of the pre-season stuff above to have an idea of who could do what and where before tryouts happened without checking out the MS team. Add to it, that most boys grow a foot or more from 8th-10th grade, not sure how much info our varsity coach would really gain by watching a MS practice. Then again, we're a large public school with only a couple of private school options, so perhaps private schools competing for players may have different needs?

          Comment


          • #20
            My kids attended a large classification high school. In baseball and softball I could tell who had a varsity future by 8th grade. It may not be clear with every player who will star. But you can see baseball/softball skills, athleticism, work ethic and mental approach. With a few exceptions you can look at parents for potential physical growth.

            The only kid I was wrong on was a 5’ 8th grader who only grew to be 5’6”. He refused to give up. He quit his best sport (soccer) to focus year round on his passion for baseball. He went from JV bench to third team all conference junior year to playing JuCo ball for a year. The kid hit three homers senior year at legit MLB dimension fields.

            When my son was in 7th grade a new baseball coach took over. Part of the deal was having some input on the middle school program for development. In was in on the coach selection process. He provided drills. He ran a couple of practices each year. He attended a couple of games and requested some players play a few innings at particular positions to see what they had.

            Comment


            • #21
              Obviously, every situation is different. Our middle school coach just got promoted to JV coach at our high school. I sent him an email asking for his advice and this was part of his response which I think addresses a number of these posts:

              "Honestly at 12, 13, even 14 our job, and goal is to get them ready to play varsity ball! I will help in any way I can! BTW: Please realize and let your son know, some ballplayers struggle a little when transitioning to the big field. If that happens, it’s perfectly normal - he’s not alone. Practice, age, and growth clears that up!!"

              Comment


              • #22
                I believe there’s a little political correctness in the coach’s response. Good players, even the small ones still a ways from puberty don’t struggle in the transition to the big field. But the field transition is where you find out who doesn’t have the mechanics or strength the proceed. Players can’t just out run and out muscle the field anymore. It’s too big.

                A good preteen player on a small field hitting the ball to and over the fence is still hitting line drive singles on a full size field until he grows and starts driving the ball again. A preteen with a decent arm doesn’t struggle to throw the ball across the infield on a reasonable line until he grows and throws BB’s.

                Comment


                • #23
                  i think what coach is saying is that what happens in MS doesn't really matter -it may or may not translate to HS, which is why the coaches work on developing players. Even at the freshman/JV level, the main goal is getting players ready for varsity. Work hard and enjoy it, but don't sweat it, because there's way too many factors out of your control.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Our middle school baseball is played in the fall. We have a 7th and 8th grade team. Of course there is also middle school football happening at the same time so you don't always get a good look at those who will make the high school team.
                    Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

                    I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I am a MS coach of the only feeder in a large classification HS, so I'll give you the perspective at our school. The thing is that playing MS ball is not required to play HS. During 8th grade ball, the MS players often scrimmage the Freshman team, and is an opportunity to be seen by HS coaches. For 7th grade, there is little to no HS coach involvement. The benefit of MS ball is to get kids used to playing with their grade age (versus league age), with kids they could potentially play HS ball with, and in conditions more similar to HS (i.e. field size and bats). In the end, the HS team will generally pick the kids who are the best players. What team a kid plays on in 7th grade isn't a big deal. One thing I will state, though, is that there are some travel teams that are all about playing games, and our MS ball may help them in that situation, as we have a lot of practices.

                      Another benefit is to have an idea of where your kid stacks up against the others in his grade. If your kid isn't in the top 9 in MS ball, he either needs to get significantly better or if playing HS baseball is really important, we have had kids go to the local private school (kind of expensive for baseball, but to each their own). My middle kid was in this boat, and managed to go through puberty late, and catch the top 9 as a Freshman, but didn't make it to the next step. He did the third option: started soccer. Either way, it can be a good gauge of how your kid stacks up.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

                        this is how our HS does it. Aside from a few months off throwing (Nov-Jan), there is a fall throwing and workout, winter hitting league, late winter throwing and workout and early spring scrimmages. These are run by "player captains" and select parents, but not coaches. Rules recently changed, but this is basically what it boils down to.

                        For all the talk about HS coaches checking out MS teams, for us, MS sports were a joke and had no bearing on HS. HS coaches could care less and were hardly "grooming" any players for HS ball -this was true for football, basketball, and baseball. We're in a large classification school that is generally pretty competitive, so not sure how HS coaches would have time in season to come to a MS practice or game? That's like them going to a 13/14u TB game? We did have the freshman coaches come to a couple of our 14u practices -but that was mainly to see what we taught and make sure we weren't abusing too many pitchers before they stepped into HS. Coaches had plenty of time evaluating all of the pre-season stuff above to have an idea of who could do what and where before tryouts happened without checking out the MS team. Add to it, that most boys grow a foot or more from 8th-10th grade, not sure how much info our varsity coach would really gain by watching a MS practice. Then again, we're a large public school with only a couple of private school options, so perhaps private schools competing for players may have different needs?
                        we are same situation. large classification high school, 1 big MS. my wife and i have always been involved in our school district and one thing i have noticed is that there is a pretty big variance in how integrated the levels are from sport to sport. some sports are run more as a program all the way down, some do not. baseball does not and as a consequence the tryouts and season is kind of a mess. its hard for kids to stand out at tryouts, good kids don't make the team, some end up going to private high schools as a result of a bad experience. basketball is the same way. other sports, like soccer, lacrosse, etc. seem to have more interest at MS.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Our large classification high school was a sports disaster until a new AD was hired. Before his hire our high school had a nickname implying it was a noncompetitive doormat. The new AD had been an assistant at a powerhouse high school. One by one he fired all the existing coaches. He hired rising star assistant coaches from winning programs. The varsity coach was essentially made the head of his program from varsity down to 7th grade teams. Varsity coaches had input on 7th grade team hires. The middle school had their own AD.

                          When the new softball coach was hired my daughter was playing 9/10 rec. He approached another dad and I to start a 12u travel team the following year. Five of those girls eventually led the high school varsity to a 54-2 conference record (about 96-16 overall), four conference titles and three state appearances. The new varsity baseball coach knew who the talented players were starting in LL and CR.

                          To quote the varsity football coach, it’s challenging recruiting players (convincing them to play) off the mean streets of the country clubs (four within the school district boundaries). But the football team started going 7-4 to 9-2 every year. Each year they would get spanked and eliminated by a 4,000 enrollment blue collar high school.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
                            Our large classification high school was a sports disaster until a new AD was hired. Before his hire our high school had a nickname implying it was a noncompetitive doormat. The new AD had been an assistant at a powerhouse high school. One by one he fired all the existing coaches. He hired rising star assistant coaches from winning programs. The varsity coach was essentially made the head of his program from varsity down to 7th grade teams. Varsity coaches had input on 7th grade team hires. The middle school had their own AD.

                            When the new softball coach was hired my daughter was playing 9/10 rec. He approached another dad and I to start a 12u travel team the following year. Five of those girls eventually led the high school varsity to a 54-2 conference record (about 96-16 overall), four conference titles and three state appearances. The new varsity baseball coach knew who the talented players were starting in LL and CR.

                            To quote the varsity football coach, it’s challenging recruiting players (convincing them to play) off the mean streets of the country clubs (four within the school district boundaries). But the football team started going 7-4 to 9-2 every year. Each year they would get spanked and eliminated by a 4,000 enrollment blue collar high school.
                            I definitely like the idea of a more integrated program, but not sure how widespread this is -particularly in a public school system. Private schools have much more leeway here. Generally our MS coaches were teachers who coached, not coaches who taught. And I don't think teachers could be fired because they weren't good coaches and new teachers couldn't be hired just because they needed better coaches. Where we live now, there are travel feeder programs for basketball and baseball, but the HS coaches don't attend any events (practice or game) and have zero input as to how its run (which I don't think they can legally even if they wanted to) --I know this because I coached and served on the board for the baseball program

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Our high school varsity coaches didn’t have to teach in the district. They just had to be state certified teachers whether they were teaching or not. The AD looked within the district first. Then they looked within the county and the neighboring county. Both my son’s varsity coaches taught in the district. Only one of three of my daughter’s varsity coaches taught in the district.

                              The Pop Warner football program used a scaled down high school playbook. Younger kids aren’t going to pass with the frequency and proficiency of a high school program. While I coached a run and gun Paul Westhead basketball philosophy all our plays (when we ran them) were the high school plays. The high school coach had a walk it up and run plays philosophy. Some of the travel coaches didn’t do this given their kids were in private schools.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by AdamInNY View Post
                                I saw some suggestions about skipping 12U. I wouldn't suggest it. The kids have a blast at 12U. Enjoy it while you can.

                                Not only don't we have MS practices here in NYC, we don't even have MS baseball so have to play travel in the spring ;-).
                                There is public school MS ball in NYC but it is very limited throughout the districts. I think in my area, there are only 2 teams...and there is CYO ***dramatic sigh***. I agree, play on the small field as long as possible for the fun as it will become work to play and excel in 60/90 and if the kid doesn't love it, he/she will not survive the grind.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X