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Mental Toughness when Hitting

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  • Mental Toughness when Hitting

    I found that I was always getting pissed off and was thrown off my game when I wasn't able to be consistent at-bat. I found the website The School For Mental Hitting Toughness & Approach. I began following the steps to improve on controlling my temper and focusing on the next pitch. Next thing I knew I was making more contact during my at-bats because I was able to stay calm and focus on each pitch. I wasn't worried anymore about drilling the ball deep center field. Now I am more consistent during my at-bats and am feeling great about my swing. I hope you can all find as much love for this website as I did. I hope you guys enjoy it! Good luck out there guys!


    -SOMMER
    Last edited by mudvnine; 04-18-2020, 04:46 PM. Reason: Removed advertising link.

  • #2
    Sommer,

    Steve Springer, and his "Quality At Bats" CD have been spoken of highly, and at length here in the past by myself and others at this site...and I'm glad to hear that you too found it very useful and helpful to your game.

    But per this website's policy, "Baseball Fever is not a promotional environment. Advertising of products, web sites, etc., whether for profit or not-for-profit, is not permitted" and why I removed the link to the purely advertising site to where it went.

    Thank you for your understanding, and "Welcome to BBF". I hope that you find it to be interesting, entertaining, and educational wrt to the great game of baseball. We look forward to your continued participation, and continued sharing of what you found both good, and bad in your journey as a baseball player, and/or coach.


    All the best,
    mud -
    In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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    • #3
      Go to the plate with a plan. Stay composed. Try not to allow the pitcher to upset your plan with his plan.
      Last edited by JettSixty; 04-20-2020, 06:30 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
        Go to the plan with a plan. Stay composed. Try not to allow the pitcher to upset your plan with his plan.
        My freshman high school kid has the opposite issue. Too much thinking in the box, and passive on the first pitch. Any tips for somebody like him?

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        • #5

          Originally posted by octoad View Post

          My freshman high school kid has the opposite issue. Too much thinking in the box, and passive on the first pitch. Any tips for somebody like him?
          If I might, that's the idea with a plan....narrow your focus early, and that expand when you end up well behind in the count (which hopefully won't be that often with the proper plan).

          IOWs, even before stepping to the plate, your son should know what "his" pitches are, and just as important, what the "pitcher's" pitches are. The "pitcher's" pitches part is done while in the dugout watching what the pitcher is throwing to the other hitters before him.
          • What's he throwing in what count, especially early on in the count (0-0, 1-0, 0-1, 2-0), in what order or sequence(s) if any?
          • Of those pitches he's throwing which ones are he able to locate, and which ones are not finding the strike zone?
          • Of those that he's able to locate, where in the zone is he locating them early in the count (most HS pitchers/coaches are typically going to start out down and away)?
          • With that basic information, how does that equate with what are the "hitter's" pitches?
          • From there the plan is built.
          So now going to the plate, your son's plan should be to look for what he's now anticipating the pitcher to throw, and then assimilate that into what he likes hit. If the he knows that the pitcher typically starts with a FB down/away, and your son like to hit pitches down in the zone, than that's what he's looking for at 0-0. If he gets anything other than that, he knows that from his plan that he's not swinging at it whether the pitcher or not the pitcher throws that "other" pitch for a strike or not. He now steps backs, to regather his thoughts, and to go over step two in his plan depending on what happened with the last pitch (is he 1-0 or 0-1), and then determine where, and with what he thinks the pitch will come back with for the next pitch depending on the new count, and what he did in that situation with the other hitters he's faced in that situation.

          If the pitcher "pitches backwards", and leads off most hitters with an CB, or OS pitch, if your son hits those well when he can anticipate them...well then go up there looking for one when and where he'd like to hit it. If he doesn't get it where he wants, or he simply doesn't like hitting CB's even when he knows they're coming - or the pitcher uncharacteristically throws a FB in the situation - just lay off of it, and let if go for whatever it is, and then step out, and go to step two, depending on the count (1-0, 0-1) just like above, and replan for the next pitch.

          This same planning, and executing the plan continues pitch per pitch until the AB ends in whatever outcome. Now while this might sound like a lot of thinking...it is. But not while at the plate, but rather long before in practice, and before his ABs starts. When he steps in the box, the only thinking he's doing is simply "yes" or "no"...is the pitch that I'm expecting/anticipating where I want it or not...that determines if I swing or not.

          Sounds harder, and much more complicated than it really is. Ted Williams "Science of Hitting" has a chapter on it called "Guess? Yes!", or Steve Springer's "Quality At Bats" CD (not his videos) is another fine choice wrt making/having a plan at the plate.
          In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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          • #6
            Originally posted by octoad View Post
            My freshman high school kid has the opposite issue. Too much thinking in the box, and passive on the first pitch. Any tips for somebody like him?
            When I coached kids who would be in trouble once they fell behind in the count I told them to go up hacking. Until your son is playing varsity and travel facing college prospects the first pitch he’s taking may be the best pitch he sees in that at bat.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

              When I coached kids who would be in trouble once they fell behind in the count I told them to go up hacking. Until your son is playing varsity and travel facing college prospects the first pitch he’s taking may be the best pitch he sees in that at bat.
              I agree. To many watch good pitches go by looking for the perfect count perfect pitch. When it never comes and then you end in a hole and hit the pitchers pitch. Grip it and rip it

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              • #8
                Against a HS pitcher I would just look for a FB down the pipe, maybe a bit shifted to one quadrant if you like to swing there more because few pitchers at that level will spot their FB consistently or have breaking ball control.

                even mike trout said he is sitting fastball middle and it works for him so you don't need to overcomplicate
                https://youtu.be/ne_7xhj-Huc

                sure there might be certain pitchers were you need to sit on breaking ball but most of the time looking for a FB up the middle is probably good enough.

                the important thing Is not how good your plan is but how good you stick with it. If you think FB middle you need to actually give the pitcher the outer 3-4 inch of the zone and take those pitches and breaking balls.

                But looking fastball either down the pipe or slightly shifted to a certain zone will probably always be best at the amateur level because most pitchers will throw breaking balls not consistently for strikes.
                I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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