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The Demo (by request)

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  • The Demo (by request)

    Mark H and Hiddengem asked me to post the video of my contraption that gives a rough simulation of how the shoulder rotation moves the bat and not arm or wrist strength or force.

    A link to the video is provided below, and below that is a still image sequence with the path of the bathead, "hands" and front "elbow"

    For those out there that think that huge forearm and wrist strength gets the bathead to the ball, please explain how the bathead in this demo got from its position in photo 2, to the impact position in photo 4, with zero muscles involved.

    The movement of the hand joint along the yellow path creates angular momentum which whips the bathead around to catch up to where the hands are going.

    http://firstpickclub.com/video/boxexp3.mpg



    The hips turn first, which then forces the shoulders to turn when the side muscle fully stretches. Then the side muscle contracts and accelerates the shoulders to catch up with the hips. The arms stay rigidly in their original shape, connected to the rotating shoulders, which pulls the hands around as the demo device pulled the "hand" corner. The bathead whips around through momentum, the hands uncock due to the 1,200+ pounds of force whipping around at the ball, just as the bathead did in the demo. It spun on a screw at the "hands" corner of the pvc box.

    A real swing would have more angle because the hands would be up near the armpit. I should have started the rotation of the contraption with the "hands" higher, and it would have shown more of an arc of the hands and it would have created more acceleration in the bathead, but you get the idea, I hope.
    Last edited by jbooth; 02-24-2006, 05:47 PM.

  • #2
    Understanding this is a big huge hairy deal-a key to effortless power/quick high batspeed all summed up in the words, leave your hands back and rotate. Paul did this same thing with computer simulations but seeing it in real world materials everyone can understand is very valuable in terms of a lot of people "getting it" I believe.

    Comment


    • #3
      I suppose I get it

      Interesting....

      I guess this is your work, but man....we have too much time on our hands don't we! (just some playful kidding now!)

      A contraption I think would be more beneficial however, is something that would help a young player develop the proper box. Like two elbow pads such as those a player might wear in hockey, connected by some kind of, I'll use the term "bar", although I know that's not the best term. This bar would somehow need to collapse so that eventually a player could extend after contact.

      Just banging aound in my head, that's all.

      Tom

      Comment


      • #4
        Many different people have seen/ described, illustrated , this phenom in many ways. My images on my original CD ( that has some bad swings I know) showed an outline of a U. We form the U and rock the U back until the led elbow is behnd the belly button. It was a box with no top basically.

        We saw that if you formed the U and rocked it back until the led elbow was behind the belly button and maintained that positon until the lead foot got down then players hit better.

        Nyman focused the readers on rear elbow scap loading( and much more in fairness) including connection.

        Later descriptions of forming the box and maintaining the box through 1/2 the rotation said it another way and I like as a cue.

        Keeping the lead arms , elbow, and bat in the momentum plane of the shoulder turn was mentioned but it has been debated whether you should start there are whether you could arrive there from a vertical weightless bat and the advantages and disadvantages.

        Others say cast it all away and understand the core first. probably some truth to all of this
        Last edited by swingbuster; 02-25-2006, 07:30 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Many different people have seen/ described, illustrated , this phenom in many ways. My images on my original CD ( that has some bad swings I know) showed an outline of a U. He form the U and rock the U back. It was a box with no top basically.

          We saw that if you formed the U and rocked it back until the led elbow was behind the belly button and maintained that positon until the lead foot got down then players hit better.

          Nyman focused the readers on rear elbow scap loading( and much more in fairness)

          Later descriptions of forming the box and maintaining the box through 1/2 the rotation said it another way and I like as a cue.

          Keeping the lead arm , elbow, and bat in the momentum plane of the shoulder turn was mentioned but it was debated whether you should start there or whether you could arrive there from a vertical weightless bat. The later created other swing characteristics one of which is an earlier spatial hip/ shoulder connection and the ability to have a better inside /out swing for oppo hits .

          You can get educated or go to trade school. I am still getting educated.
          Last edited by swingbuster; 02-25-2006, 08:42 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tominct
            Interesting....

            I guess this is your work, but man....we have too much time on our hands don't we! (just some playful kidding now!)

            A contraption I think would be more beneficial however, is something that would help a young player develop the proper box. Like two elbow pads such as those a player might wear in hockey, connected by some kind of, I'll use the term "bar", although I know that's not the best term. This bar would somehow need to collapse so that eventually a player could extend after contact.

            Just banging aound in my head, that's all.

            Tom
            Those types of gadgets already exist, and I made one of my own, but they aren't that helpful. The student has to understand WHAT he needs to do and WHY, and then just keep working, with instructor guidance until he figures out, HOW to do it.

            I simply tell the student to imagine that the hands and back shoulder are not separate pieces, but actually just one, or two locked together. When you start to move the bat, the hands and shoulder move as one piece, and you have to keep your elbows at their original angles as you rotate. That is essentially what the age old saying, "keep your hands back" means. You keep the hands "back" at your armpit in the initial phase of turning, and the shoulder turn is after the hip turn.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by swingbuster
              Many different people have seen/ described, illustrated , this phenom in many ways. My images on my original CD ( that has some bad swings I know) showed an outline of a U. We form the U and rock the U back until the led elbow is behnd the belly button. It was a box with no top basically.

              We saw that if you formed the U and rocked it back until the led elbow was behind the belly button and maintained that positon until the lead foot got down then players hit better.

              Nyman focused the readers on rear elbow scap loading( and much more in fairness) including connection.

              Later descriptions of forming the box and maintaining the box through 1/2 the rotation said it another way and I like as a cue.

              Keeping the lead arms , elbow, and bat in the momentum plane of the shoulder turn was mentioned but it has been debated whether you should start there are whether you could arrive there from a vertical weightless bat and the advantages and disadvantages.

              Others say cast it all away and understand the core first. probably some truth to all of this
              Yes, the front elbow should be back in line with the belly-button and the hands should be near the armpit/shoulder. That is the typical MLB "box".

              Once the box is formed, I simply tell the student to imagine that the hands and back shoulder are not separate pieces, but actually just one, or two locked together. When you start to move the bat, the hands and shoulder move as one piece, and you have to keep your elbows at their original angles as you rotate "keep the box connected." That is essentially what the age old saying, "keep your hands back" means. You keep the hands "back" at your armpit in the initial phase of turning, and the shoulder turn is after the hip turn.

              Comment


              • #8
                Good points...we go on to say in the CD that "hands back" is really a shoulder function or shoulders back.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jbooth
                  Those types of gadgets already exist, and I made one of my own, but they aren't that helpful.
                  Hmmm....I get just about every catalogue known to man, I would imagine, and I have never seen such a device. Perhaps their having proved less than helpful might explain that.

                  Comment

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