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  • Rotational/Linear or Connection/Extension

    The other day I was putting together a piece trying to explain the key difference between Rotational Hitting and Linear Hitting...

    - Rotational vs. Linear: What's The Key Difference?

    While I think I did a pretty good job with the piece, as I was writing it I came to realize that it was slightly irrelevant.

    I say that because IMO the big argument when it comes to hitting isn't the hand path; whether it's rotational (circular to near-circular) or linear. Only a few fringe guys preach a linear hand path and ZERO big league hitters use a linear hand path.

    The big argument also isn't what the lower body does; both rotational and linear guys advocate some stride and weight shift.

    In my opinion, the chief argument in hitting instruction today is between Connection and Extension. Connection is what most good hitters do (and what most rotational instructors preach) but Extension is what most baseball commentators, and many baseball instructors, still teach. By extension I mean extension AT or THROUGH the point of contact (rather than AFTER the point of contact). I was taught this as making the "Power V" at the point of contact.

    Does anyone else feel that the whole linear/rotational thing is kind of missing the point?
    Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

    I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    The other day I was putting together a piece trying to explain the key difference between Rotational Hitting and Linear Hitting...

    - Rotational vs. Linear: What's The Key Difference?

    While I think I did a pretty good job with the piece, as I was writing it I came to realize that it was slightly irrelevant.

    I say that because IMO the big argument when it comes to hitting isn't the hand path; whether it's rotational (circular to near-circular) or linear. Only a few fringe guys preach a linear hand path and ZERO big league hitters use a linear hand path.

    The big argument also isn't what the lower body does; both rotational and linear guys advocate some stride and weight shift.

    In my opinion, the chief argument in hitting instruction today is between Connection and Extension. Connection is what most good hitters do (and what most rotational instructors preach) but Extension is what most baseball commentators, and many baseball instructors, still teach. By extension I mean extension AT or THROUGH the point of contact (rather than AFTER the point of contact). I was taught this as making the "Power V" at the point of contact.

    Does anyone else feel that the whole linear/rotational thing is kind of missing the point?
    Chris, you know I agree with you. To me the big difference in hitting instuction involves whether the hands or the body controls the swing and whether you should teach "hands down" or "bottom up". jima

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
      The other day I was putting together a piece trying to explain the key difference between Rotational Hitting and Linear Hitting...

      While I think I did a pretty good job with the piece, as I was writing it I came to realize that it was slightly irrelevant.

      I say that because IMO the big argument when it comes to hitting isn't the hand path; whether it's rotational (circular to near-circular) or linear. Only a few fringe guys preach a linear hand path and ZERO big league hitters use a linear hand path.

      The big argument also isn't what the lower body does; both rotational and linear guys advocate some stride and weight shift.

      In my opinion, the chief argument in hitting instruction today is between Connection and Extension. Connection is what most good hitters do (and what most rotational instructors preach) but Extension is what most baseball commentators, and many baseball instructors, still teach. By extension I mean extension AT or THROUGH the point of contact (rather than AFTER the point of contact). I was taught this as making the "Power V" at the point of contact.

      Does anyone else feel that the whole linear/rotational thing is kind of missing the point?
      Chris, I'm sorry but I think you are completely missing the "linear point".

      I've said so many times here. Linear hitting is quite simply a style that keeps the body moving forward into contact. It really has nothing to do with "connection vs. extension" into contact.

      I just don't get why this concept is so hard to understand.........

      Linear hitters tend to display certain characteristics:

      1.) Forward movement of the COM into contact.
      2.) Head and shoulders usually in a more forward attitude at contact.
      3.) Weight distributed more over the front leg vs. staying behind the front leg.
      4.) Rear foot often off the ground at contact due to the forward position of the body into contact.
      5.) Flatter bat path from linear movement of COM into contact.

      Neither one of these CLASSIC linear hitters is showing the power V at contact:

      Last edited by BoardMember; 02-15-2008, 09:34 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've said this before, and I'll say it again. I truly believe that when commentators talk about "he got his arms extended". they are talking about extending over the plate and not in front.

        Not some full on high school arm swing over the plate style, but I.E. a pitch down the middle, player gets a little bit extended over the plate, and drives it a long ways.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cosmo34 View Post
          I've said this before, and I'll say it again. I truly believe that when commentators talk about "he got his arms extended". they are talking about extending over the plate and not in front.
          Agreed....

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BoardMember View Post


            Chris, I'm sorry but I think you are completely missing the "linear point".

            I've said so many times here. Linear hitting is quite simply a style that keeps the body moving forward into contact. It really has nothing to do with "connection vs. extension" into contact.

            I just don't get why this concept is so hard to understand.........

            Linear hitters tend to display certain characteristics:

            1.) Forward movement of the COM into contact.
            2.) Head and shoulders usually in a more forward attitude at contact.
            3.) Weight distributed more over the front leg vs. staying behind the front leg.
            4.) Rear foot often off the ground at contact due to the forward position of the body into contact.
            5.) Flatter bat path from linear movement of COM into contact.

            Neither one of these CLASSIC linear hitters is showing the power V at contact:

            BM, how (where) do you think that Aaron and Clemente derived their terrific bat speed and power? Neither was a big man, particularly in comparison to the great power hitters of today. jima

            Comment

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