Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Glove Side Arm

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Glove Side Arm

    Hey I have a new video but I'm wondering what I should do about my glove side arm. It seems to be good then it flops to the side and never really tightens like Mariano Rivera and such right at the side of them.



    or



    or



    or



    or


    It looks like the power would be transfered better right to the ball if you pull the glove in like that tight. I'm not to sure but should I change the way I pull the glove in to get more energy to the ball?

    RIstar Pitching


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27dFtK7X4Gc


    Should I change this before the season?

  • #2
    My son has had pitching lessons and catcher lessons. Even in a catcher throw down they want you to tuck your glove in to the point of aiming your front elbow at your target. Plus as I remember it helps with balance accuracy and weight exchange form front should to throwing shoulder. I even heard it describe one time as it's like playing tug of war, pulling your front side back. I don't think the instructor meant it as a training action, but more as a visualization.


    Everybody has there own theory/way of teaching, but that is what I have heard the most,


    drill
    Last edited by Drill; 02-21-2008, 11:47 AM.
    Yogi Berra was asked by a reporter "How do you catch a knuckle ball?" He came right back and said "When it stops rolling"

    Comment


    • #3
      sorry double post
      Yogi Berra was asked by a reporter "How do you catch a knuckle ball?" He came right back and said "When it stops rolling"

      Comment


      • #4
        RI...my kid is taught to keep the glove side arm out to the target and move the chest to the glove...not pull the glove in. Its not easy to do..since you have to use your whole body. Some pitchers who "pull" their glove in will tend to open up their lead shoulder too soon and "spin out". My son's coach wants him to feel as though his chest moves to the glove and then throws over it (the glove) in a more "over the top" or "downhill" straight line. If he does it right, the glove does end up tucked near the chest. He tries to do this when he does long toss also. One thing to remember though is that my son used to have kind of a jerky; left shoulder open motion...he tried to use only his shoulder and arm to produce velocity. His coach recognized that and has has smoothed out his delivery and allowed him to better incorporate his legs and core. H.S. try outs on Monday. Good luck to you. jima

        Comment


        • #5
          Your glove side's fine. As you know, I don't like your throwing arm action but you've already said that what I've told you was "bad advice" on that issue.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dm59 View Post
            As you know, I don't like your throwing arm action but you've already said that what I've told you was "bad advice" on that issue.
            DM, he may have the biggest timing problem I've ever seen.
            Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

            I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

            Comment


            • #7
              Maybe so. He's also got the biggest shortarming problem I've ever seen but he doesn't want to hear about any of that.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                DM, he may have the biggest timing problem I've ever seen.
                Chris, could that be from all the unnecessary motion in the delivery...the side step and back to the plate, etc.?

                DM - the short arming could come from the fact that the target looks like its about 15' away.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jima View Post
                  Chris, could that be from all the unnecessary motion in the delivery...the side step and back to the plate, etc.?

                  DM - the short arming could come from the fact that the target looks like its about 15' away.
                  I think what I'm calling a timing problem, DM is describing as short-arming.

                  It's really the same basic thing.

                  The excessive reverse-rotation of the shoulders is part of the problem. A bigger problem is the Inverted L to Inverted W in his arm action.



                  It's hard to get the PAS forearm up in time when you start out with the forearm hanging down vertically like that.

                  This clip of BJ Ryan shows the same basic problem.



                  Notice how BJ Ryan's forearm is nearly vertical (pointing down) at the moment his shoulders start to rotate (in Frame 22).
                  Last edited by Chris O'Leary; 02-21-2008, 04:58 PM.
                  Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                  I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                    I think what I'm calling a timing problem, DM is describing as short-arming.

                    It's really the same basic thing.

                    The excessive reverse-rotation of the shoulders is part of the problem. A bigger problem is the Inverted L to Inverted W in his arm action.



                    It's hard to get the PAS forearm up in time when you start out with the forearm hanging down vertically like that.

                    This clip of BJ Ryan shows the same basic problem.



                    Notice how BJ Ryan's forearm is nearly vertical (pointing down) at the moment his shoulders start to rotate.
                    yeah, "reverse rotation" that's what I meant by "back to the plate" ala Luis Tiant. Doesn't Maddux have his arm down? maybe not vertical, but down.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jima View Post
                      Doesn't Maddux have his arm down? maybe not vertical, but down.
                      No.

                      Maddux's timing is excellent, as you would expect.

                      His PAS forearm is nearly vertical (upwards) at the moment his shoulders start rotating.
                      Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                      I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Chris, sorry, what you mean by reverse rotation then is "scap loading" right? Much of that reverse rotation is due to him turning his back to home plate. So what do you mean by bad timing?...short arming, can be but generally speaking, is not a timing issue. What I was trying to say is that he has a lot of motion that does not help him pitch the ball and can only get in the way of good timing.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jima View Post
                          Chris, sorry, what you mean by reverse rotation then is "scap loading" right? Much of that reverse rotation is due to him turning his back to home plate. So what do you mean by bad timing?...short arming, can be but generally speaking, is not a timing issue. What I was trying to say is that he has a lot of motion that does not help him pitch the ball and can only get in the way of good timing.
                          First, I don't think short-arming (defined as having the PAS elbow bent less than 90 degrees at the high-cocked position) is actually a problem and might even be good. I say that because Maddux and Clemens do it.





                          Second, by bad timing I mean that the PAS forearm is not vertical and facing upwards (as it should be) at the moment the shoulders start to turn. In many cases, bad timing (ala Chris Carpenter) means the PAS forearm is horizontal at the moment the shoulders start turning. BJ Ryan happens to have terrible timing.

                          Third, scap loading is different than reverse rotation. Maddux scap loads...



                          ...but he doesn't reverse-rotate his shoulders (much). Maddux's shoulders point to the 3B side of the plate during his arm swing.
                          Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                          I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Do you see a problem with my arm action with my momentum pitching mechanics?

                            My arm gets up at the center line.

                            Chris could you please take a look?

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dq4qYkGceuw

                            and also a picture that shows at the center line my arm is up.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RIstar View Post
                              Do you see a problem with my arm action with my momentum pitching mechanics?

                              My arm gets up at the center line.

                              Chris could you please take a look?

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dq4qYkGceuw
                              Your timing is really inconsistent.

                              It's OK in the first pitch and pretty bad in the second pitch.
                              Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                              I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X