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  • #16
    Dirt,

    Based on your answer above, I have a feeling that you didn't know who Carl Hubbell is. How can you throw a screwball and NOT know who Carl Hubbell is?

    Just so you know, MM was NOT the first pitcher to throw a screwball.

    Just stirrin' it up....

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Deemax View Post
      August 22nd, 1938 article on the greatest screwball pitcher ever....Carl Hubbell

      "Hubbell has an arm operation for bone chips in his elbow and is finished for the season. He tells writers that for several years his elbow has hurt from throwing his screwball."

      My pitching coach in college also threw a screwball, and that screwball got him to the big leagues... He also had elbow and shoulder injuries from this pitch which required surgery.

      Pronation before release is not "natural" pronation, and is not a pitch that should be taught unless all other options of getting hitters out has been exhausted (in adult pitchers).

      IMO your dead wrong.
      There are too many confounding variables to make this statement.

      First, Hubbell isn't an MD. He just THINKS the screwball is the problem. That doesn't mean it was.

      Second, your college PC isn't an MD. He just THINKS the screwball is the problem. That doesn't mean it was.

      Third, Mike Marshall threw tons of screwballs. Why didn't he suffer the same fate?

      Logically, if the screwball was as bad as people say, then Marshall should have had major problems since he threw the screwball. Since he didn't, that suggests that something else is the root cause of the problem.
      Last edited by Chris O'Leary; 02-25-2008, 05:47 AM.
      Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

      I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Deemax View Post
        OK dirt, Its Hall of Famer Carl Hubbell. The greatest screwballer ever says this pitch is not natural, and is the reason his arm was destroyed.
        Sorry, but Hubbell doesn't have the proper credentials to make this statement.

        It's like listening to a NASCAR driver explain why his engine blew up. I pay more attention to what the mechanic says since he built and actually understands the engine.
        Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

        I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

        Comment


        • #19
          so hubbell blew out his arm that way? how come marshall threw one for 14 years and didnt any problems?
          2008 varsity stats
          AB-35 K-5 BB-6 H-14 2B-3 3B-0 HR-0 RBI-10 BA- .400
          all stars pitching stats--- W-L= 1-0
          IP- 5 H- 1 BB- 2 HR- 0 ER- 0 K- 8 ERA: 0.00

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          • #20
            Originally posted by jamesh23 View Post
            so hubbell blew out his arm that way? how come marshall threw one for 14 years and didnt any problems?
            Precisely.

            If the screwball truly was a killer pitch, then it should have killed Marshall's arm as well.

            Why didn't it?

            That suggests that something else was going on.
            Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

            I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

            Comment


            • #21
              First, Hubbell isn't an MD.
              There is no MD in front of Chris O'leary either. Carl Hubbell knew his bread and butter (the screwball) hurt when he threw it.

              Third, Mike Marshall threw tons of screwballs. Why didn't he suffer the same fate?
              There are not alot of absolutes in this game. Your thoughts on the screwball, the "L", and "M" prove this. Comparing MM to CH is not apples to apples.

              Mike Marshall also threw alot of other pitches. Hubbell used his screwball as much as he could, and pitched nearly 3 times as many innings as Marshall.

              Logically, if the screwball was as bad as people say, then Marshall should have had major problems since he threw the screwball. Since he didn't, that suggests that something else is the root cause of the problem.
              Logically? Every time you embrace this pitch and continue to teach it to 12 year olds, Im going to call you out on it.
              Logically? The greatest screwballer ever says the pitch is bad for your arm, yet you conclude it must be from something else?!

              Because the arm pronates naturally AFTER release, does not mean that it is natural or safe DURING release.
              Last edited by Deemax; 02-25-2008, 05:06 PM.
              My own signature is not impressive, so I selected one that was...
              sigpic

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              • #22
                Dee,

                You are way off on this man. When you pronate your forearm, you bring your radius bone closer towards the ulna bone. This action flexes the elbow so that you do not slam your olecranon process into ints fossa.

                If you pronate after release, you have already done the damage of slamming your olecranon process into its fossa, which causes bone chips, spurs, etc... The centripetal force that throws your arm laterally away from your body will ensure that you slam your two bones together if you do not pronate during the release of you pitch. This is especially true for breaking pitches such as the slider and curveball.

                MD does not go in front of someones name by the way, it goes after. And while there is no MD behind Dr. Mike Marshall, there is a PhD. MD's do NOT know kinesiology, which explains joint actions of the body. They do not take this class in Med School. But guess who does? Someone who gets a PhD in exercise physiology and kinesiology. Someone like Dr. Mike Marshall. Someone who taught kinesiology at the graduate level for years.

                One thing that I will agree with Chris is, that the screwball is the most safest pitch someone can learn to throw. Dee, you dont know that you dont know.

                Pitching a baseball is based on science, namely phsyics, where there ARE absolutes. Mike Marshall also through others pitches, yes. He through a maxline fastball, which is pronated, a slider, which he pronated, and a sinker, which he pronated, and by the way is in between a screwball and fastball. But his bread and butter pitch, the one that made his famous, was the SCREWBALL.

                That Hubbell is the greatest screwball pitcher in the history of the game is your opinion. Did Hubbell have any sort of advanced degree having to do with science and how the body works? I DOUBT IT! He prolly didnt know what his olecranon process even was or where it was located.

                Comment


                • #23
                  If you pronate after release, you have already done the damage of slamming your olecranon process into its fossa, which causes bone chips, spurs, etc... The centripetal force that throws your arm laterally away from your body will ensure that you slam your two bones together if you do not pronate during the release of you pitch.
                  Show me anyone, including MM guys that have pronated before release on a fastball.... is the goal to actively think about pronating, or to actually pronate a fastball before it leaves your hand?

                  Is this hand pronated before release on a MM maxline fastball? IMO no.





                  One thing that I will agree with Chris is, that the screwball is the most safest pitch someone can learn to throw.
                  IMO, and in my experience this is not true.


                  Pitching a baseball is based on science, namely phsyics, where there ARE absolutes.
                  One absolute is never teach the exact same delivery to every pitcher. Your right, there are absolutes in pitching.... but like I said, not alot. Pitching a baseball is based on so much more than science.

                  Did Hubbell have any sort of advanced degree having to do with science and how the body works? I DOUBT IT! He prolly didnt know what his olecranon process even was or where it was located.
                  Hubbell made it to the Hall of Fame as a screwball pitcher. IMO this gives his opinion on the pitch credibility.
                  My own signature is not impressive, so I selected one that was...
                  sigpic

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                  • #24
                    Dee,

                    Did I say before, or did I say during, in my last post?

                    This video is bad because 1. Its from a far away view, and 2. Its side view not straight on. If you explain to me how to put video on here from the internet, I might be able to get a better view.

                    What experience do you have with a screwball? Im not being sarcastic, seriously.

                    What else is pitching based on then?

                    I disagree with your "absolute" statements.

                    Making it to the Hall of Fame is subjective, not objective. So, imo, just because he made it to the hall doesnt mean he knew jack. A lot of pitches have or had no clue how they did things, they just did them.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The centripetal force that throws your arm laterally away from your body will ensure that you slam your two bones together if you do not pronate during the release of you pitch.
                      How is lateral forearm flyout of many traditional pitchers any safer than vertical forearm flyout of MM pitchers..? seriously.


                      What experience do you have with a screwball? Im not being sarcastic, seriously.
                      My college pitching coach pitched in the big leagues as a left handed screwballer. I spoke with him alot over my four years there about pitching, the screwball, his surgeries, mental approach, training...etc.etc.etc...

                      What else is pitching based on then?
                      Feel. The ability to pitch, and have an idea of what your doing between the lines. With your experience I think you know what Im getting at.

                      I disagree with your "absolute" statements.
                      I know. Im OK with that.
                      My own signature is not impressive, so I selected one that was...
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Dee,

                        You are going to have to explain what you mean by vertical flyout. If your arm is vertical at release, first of all, its not flying out. Secondly since you cannot raise your upper arm above the level of your shoulders, if you arm is vertical at release, you are going to have to have some degree of seperation of your pitching upper arm (humerus) to your forearm, that is unless you can lean 90 degrees to your glove side. I have seen someone lean quite a bit, but never 90 degrees yet. This seperation means that you have not locked out your arm and you cannot slam your olecranon process into its fossa.

                        Can you tell me what injuries/surgeries your coach had exactly?


                        I understand what you mean by feel.

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