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  • Wood v. Aluminum

    Rule 1.10 (baseball only)
    NOTE 3: Beginning with the 2009 season, non-wood bats used in divisions of play Little League (Majors) and below must be printed with a BPF (bat performance factor) rating of 1.15 or less.
    What does this mean? Bat manufacturers agreed several years ago that the BPF (bat performance factor) of bats they are now manufacturing will not exceed a 1.15. The BPF is a formula that measures how fast a baseball comes off the bat. Starting on Jan. 1, 2009, however, all bats used in the Little League (Majors) Division and below must be designated (printed) with a BPF of 1.15 or less.
    *******

    What is the BPF of a wood bat? How does this "new" rule make aluminum bats more like wood in responsiveness? Or does it?

    -scott
    "There are no miracles in sports. Miracles have been rehearsed hundreds of times in practice." - Scott Waz

  • #2
    I think all most softball bats are at BPF 1.2 right now. I see most youth bats at 1.15 this year. I read somewhere I think that wood bats have a BPF of 1.2 but dont quote me on that. I think the 2 main difference between wood and metal (now composite) is (1) the weight and weight distibution of balance or end loaded. (2) the size of the sweet spot. On wood bats its about the size of a half dollar piece ( well Im just guessing ), but on a non-wood bat the sweet spot is significantly larger and much more foregiving if you dont hit the sweet spot.

    I read this when googling bat bpf
    http://www.metropolismag.com/html/co...99/au99bat.htm
    Last edited by LAball; 02-26-2008, 11:45 PM.

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    • #3
      Little League needs to do much more work here or go back to wood.
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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      • #4
        I have the solution for LL. The complaint is wood bats are a budget buster because they break too frequently. LL should approach Baum or similar manufacturer for a contract to mass produce composite wood bats LL would purchase. Baum bats are about $100. A LL Majors team would only need three bats, a 29,30 and 31. A minors team would need a 28 and 29. 7/8's would need a 27 and 28. Even if parents want to buy their son their own personal bat it would be cheaper than the expensive metal bats.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TG Coach View Post
          I have the solution for LL. The complaint is wood bats are a budget buster because they break too frequently. LL should approach Baum or similar manufacturer for a contract to mass produce composite wood bats LL would purchase. Baum bats are about $100. A LL Majors team would only need three bats, a 29,30 and 31. A minors team would need a 28 and 29. 7/8's would need a 27 and 28. Even if parents want to buy their son their own personal bat it would be cheaper than the expensive metal bats.
          I've seen the wood bats with the composite handles in real life and that seems to make sense. But I hear there are wood bats dipped in composite resin, I dont know how well or if it works too well, but its only about 80 bucks and thats pretty reasonable.

          Maybe they can even cork the bats to make it -8 weight or something if the bat is sturdier. Just a thought....

          I do wish Youth baseball goes to wood, partly because I think its safer ( Well I know it is, but I've read the debate on this forum and I'll just leave it as my opinion.)

          Also I dont think its fair that some players to buy a big hit with the $350 composits while some single parents are just trying to get there kid in baseball to enjoy the game.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LAball View Post
            I've seen the wood bats with the composite handles in real life and that seems to make sense. But I hear there are wood bats dipped in composite resin, I dont know how well or if it works too well, but its only about 80 bucks and thats pretty reasonable.
            Louisville Slugger makes such a composite bat, in M110, C271, and one other profile. I don't believe they are available in lenghts less than 31". In general they swing pretty well, my guess is they are in the -1 and -2 range aas the ones I have (especially the M110 ) seem heavier than the straight wood bats. I don't think there would be many broken bats among the 8U to 11U players based on my experience with those age groups so the replacment expense argument is mute. The LL playing field would be leveled considerably with league supplied bats.

            I also do not like the "cheap" composite bat HR either and have had to battle the desire as a "Dad" to enhance my kid's chances of getting a dinger or two with technology or remain focused on the solid hard hit line drive that will pave the way to a successful future on the big field. This year it looks as if he is going to split time with the old blue Dynasty 2 3/4" and the "new" green Omaha XS 2 5/8" I got on closeout from JustBats.com. I think you have to just stick with the program as you define it and let everthing else fall into place. I am looking toward a future where the USSSA Comp-Bat studs are hitting the long flyouts on the big field while the solid hitters with good mechanics are squaring up the ball and stretching singles into doubles.
            Have Fun and Play Hard!

            Chuck Faulkner
            Tazewell TN 37879
            The Glove Medic

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            • #7
              Originally posted by skipper5
              The expense factor is a red herring, fabricated by the bat companies and dads who have a brand new $300 camcorder to video the HRs off the $200 bat.
              Could not agree more!!! Go to any bat site (Preferablle those who participate here) and check the prices for yourself! Here's Zinger http://www.zingerbats.com/?page=shop...bats_teenbats& _Also check LS -
              Custom bats for $69.00. And youngsters aren;t going to break too many bats.
              Jake
              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by skipper5
                According to the Palo Alto web site, in a fall '07 wood bat trial 18-20 bats were broken in 50 games.
                Our 10U team broke six bats in one wood bat tournament last year (4 in games and 2 in practice) and they had been taught how to properly hold the bat to ensure the grain lines up. The problem was that after the first swing they failed to remember to reset their grip correctly.

                Originally posted by skipper5
                The expense factor is a red herring, fabricated by the bat companies and dads who have a brand new $300 camcorder to video the HRs off the $200 bat.
                I am not sure what the $300 camcorder has to do with anything… Aluminum bat or not the parents are still going to have a camcorder and you can always buy last years model of bat for much less than $200.
                Coop

                Don't forget to swing hard, in case you hit the ball. ~Woodie Held

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by glovemedic View Post
                  Louisville Slugger makes such a composite bat, in M110, C271, and one other profile. I don't believe they are available in lenghts less than 31". In general they swing pretty well, my guess is they are in the -1 and -2 range aas the ones I have (especially the M110 ) seem heavier than the straight wood bats.
                  Does the wood-composite bat have more pop? I bigger or smaller sweet spot? more sting or less sting on hands with off hits?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coops View Post
                    Our 10U team broke six bats in one wood bat tournament last year (4 in games and 2 in practice) and they had been taught how to properly hold the bat to ensure the grain lines up. The problem was that after the first swing they failed to remember to reset their grip correctly.


                    I am not sure what the $300 camcorder has to do with anything… Aluminum bat or not the parents are still going to have a camcorder and you can always buy last years model of bat for much less than $200.
                    I don't care how you hold the grain, that's unusual. H.S. kids facing 80mph fastballs don't break that many in a month. Hard to imagine 10yo kids swinging about at, max 50mph, breaking anything. Good story, though.

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                    • #11
                      Coops, I just reread my post...I'm sorry, I didn't mean to infer that I didn't believe that the boys broke 6 bats...I'm sure they did. Maybe wood bats made for 10yo's are easier to break. jima

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LAball View Post
                        Does the wood-composite bat have more pop? I bigger or smaller sweet spot? more sting or less sting on hands with off hits?
                        The ball gets off the Demarini comp really quick. It also seems to swing really fast as well. I can't say much about the sting, if you hit off the end they all sting, especially in March. The comp bats just don't break.
                        Have Fun and Play Hard!

                        Chuck Faulkner
                        Tazewell TN 37879
                        The Glove Medic

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