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  • jackmcmanus21
    replied
    Originally posted by XV84 View Post
    Here is how Clemens throws it.



    Here is how Francisco Rodriguez throws his power curve.

    awesome clips...i always had mechanical problems with a curveball

    Leave a comment:


  • jamesh23
    replied
    hey fastball recommend to doc that he should get a forum going for his supporters to discuss his methods without getting harassed by other members on other forums.

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    replied
    Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
    wogdoggy,

    You can try to throw MM curve with the "traditional" motion. Im not saying that it isnt possible, just using the "traditional" motion makes in much, much harder to be able to throw the maxline pronation curve correctly.

    It also takes a certain level of strength to be able to throw this pitch. That is where Doc's training program comes into play. You need strength in your hands and fingers to be able to get the correct release.

    The pull the shade down cue is terrible. When you say point your thumb at the catcher, do you mean flex your wrist downward? Do you mean like casting a fishing pole??? If so, that is also terrible. Both these things require supination, which is extremely bad.


    thanks,,plan on spending a little time lurking on mm site

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    replied
    Originally posted by XV84 View Post
    Here is how Clemens throws it.



    Here is how Francisco Rodriguez throws his power curve.

    wow,,great clips,thanks.looks to me like they just basically "pull" down with no wrist snap..:bowdown:

    Leave a comment:


  • XV84
    replied
    Here is how Clemens throws it.



    Here is how Francisco Rodriguez throws his power curve.

    Leave a comment:


  • fastbal95
    replied
    wogdoggy,

    You can try to throw MM curve with the "traditional" motion. Im not saying that it isnt possible, just using the "traditional" motion makes in much, much harder to be able to throw the maxline pronation curve correctly.

    It also takes a certain level of strength to be able to throw this pitch. That is where Doc's training program comes into play. You need strength in your hands and fingers to be able to get the correct release.

    The pull the shade down cue is terrible. When you say point your thumb at the catcher, do you mean flex your wrist downward? Do you mean like casting a fishing pole??? If so, that is also terrible. Both these things require supination, which is extremely bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    replied
    Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
    wogdoggy,

    If you want to achieve a tighter curve with a "fast" "sharp" "late" break straight down, then you need to learn Mike Marshall's maxline pronation curve. The "traditional" curve is injurious, and no where near compares to the pronation curve. If the catches who caught mine and Jeff Sparks' curveballs at the tryouts we recently went to posted on here, they would tell you how hard it was for them to catch our curveballs because of the sharp, late break straight downward, and even some breaking back towards the pitching arm side due to overspin.

    You need to learn this curveball. It is by far the best curveball out there.

    RIstar,

    The "snap" would be the olecranon process slamming into its fossa when you supinate your curveball.

    ok can you throw the mm curve WITH the traditional pitching motion,,,so you would say pull the shade cue is more in line,then point the thumb at the catchers glove? I know you can get the ball curving with BOTH techniques BUT if I dont point my thumb and pull the shade instead it SEEMS to put more pressure on my arm ..is that because my arm doesnt slow down fast enough? doesnt the curve with faster rotation work better ? it seems im able to get more rotation when the wrist breaks and the thumb points
    Last edited by wogdoggy; 03-05-2008, 03:08 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • fastbal95
    replied
    wogdoggy,

    If you want to achieve a tighter curve with a "fast" "sharp" "late" break straight down, then you need to learn Mike Marshall's maxline pronation curve. The "traditional" curve is injurious, and no where near compares to the pronation curve. If the catches who caught mine and Jeff Sparks' curveballs at the tryouts we recently went to posted on here, they would tell you how hard it was for them to catch our curveballs because of the sharp, late break straight downward, and even some breaking back towards the pitching arm side due to overspin.

    You need to learn this curveball. It is by far the best curveball out there.

    RIstar,

    The "snap" would be the olecranon process slamming into its fossa when you supinate your curveball.

    Leave a comment:


  • RIstar
    replied
    I think pull the shade down or even pound the hammer it's the same movement. There really is not snapping just turning it over.

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    replied
    its hard to explain but when i mean wrist break i mean pitchers thumb ends up pointing at the catcher the other way would be getting rotation by just pulling down whereas the thumb ends up more pointing at dirt..i want to achieve a tighter curve with a "fast" "sharp" "late" break straight down..

    Leave a comment:


  • regionman
    replied
    curve ball release

    wogdoggy,

    Please explain as best you can what you mean by "wrist break".

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    replied
    Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
    Pitchers need to throw a curveball as such:

    They need to get their elbow up and lead with it. They need to come forward with the back of the hand facing the catcher. They need to powerfully pronate through the release of the pitch. Teaching a pitcher to supinate their breaking ball, or throw it with the thumb up, with cause them to slam their olecranon process into their fossa's in their humerus bone. This is not a good thing at all for numerous reasons. In order to really pronate the pitch, pitchers also need to drive their arm in a straight line toward home plate. They need to get their upper arm as vertical as possible and try and drive the ball inside of vertical. They also need to NOT pull their arm across their body when decelerating.

    The pronation curveball also gets as much as two times more spin velocity as a supnated curveball.
    so the wrist never "breaks" in your opinion..

    Leave a comment:


  • bamajeff
    replied
    Originally posted by wogdoggy View Post
    how do you teach it? break the wrist or not and why? do you teach thumb up with wrist break or no break..finish straight in or finish toward the first base side more? {righty}
    A true curve ball as thrown by most MLB pitchers is also sometimes referred to as a 12-6(meaning the direction of rotation). To throw this pitch, a pitcher needs to get to release point with his fingers directly on top of the ball. He will come straight down and through on release and the ball will roll off of his fingers producing the tumbling rotation.

    Leave a comment:


  • fastbal95
    replied
    Pitchers need to throw a curveball as such:

    They need to get their elbow up and lead with it. They need to come forward with the back of the hand facing the catcher. They need to powerfully pronate through the release of the pitch. Teaching a pitcher to supinate their breaking ball, or throw it with the thumb up, with cause them to slam their olecranon process into their fossa's in their humerus bone. This is not a good thing at all for numerous reasons. In order to really pronate the pitch, pitchers also need to drive their arm in a straight line toward home plate. They need to get their upper arm as vertical as possible and try and drive the ball inside of vertical. They also need to NOT pull their arm across their body when decelerating.

    The pronation curveball also gets as much as two times more spin velocity as a supnated curveball.

    Leave a comment:


  • wogdoggy
    started a topic curve ball questions

    curve ball questions

    how do you teach it? break the wrist or not and why? do you teach thumb up with wrist break or no break..finish straight in or finish toward the first base side more? {righty}

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