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  • New glove

    I got a new glove a few monthes a go. It is not broken in yet and season starts soon. Is there anything i can do? :noidea :noidea
    Brooks Robinson
    Frank Robinson
    Luis Aparicio
    Robin Roberts
    Reggie Jackson
    Eddie Murray
    Hoyt Wilhelm
    Cal Ripken Jr.
    George Kell
    Earl Weaver
    Jim Palmer
    All Baltimore Orioles' hall of famers.
    P.S. Brooks Robinson was the best!!

  • #2
    First a few don'ts. Don't dip it in water or motor oil. Don't use shaving cream. Don't bake it in an oven.

    Here's some tips from a funky site with a great product I use: Glove Stuff. (Hey, all glove conditioner is cheap compared with the value and importance of your glove, so don't skimp): http://www.sandalady.com/
    When I break-in a glove, or mitt, I use a product that I've developed after years of trying almost every leather conditioning product on the market and some that weren't. Glove Stuff® is a cleaner and conditioner that contains lanolin, to soften and moisturize the leather so that spitting in your glove—a disgusting practice, and damaging to the leather—is unnecessary. Glove Stuff® loosens even caked on dirt and grime, which can then be wiped off with a soft towel. It will not leave your glove greasy or oily. It does not attract dirt. Glove Stuff® will not make your glove heavy or floppy. It will not promote cracking or deterioration of the leather. Buy a lot. Give it as gifts!

    I apply a small amount of Glove Stuff® in the triangular area shown. I rub it into the leather until most of it has been absorbed, then wipe off the excess with a soft towel. Next, I fold the glove at the hinge and excercise that area until I feel it relax a bit. I then fold the glove and squeeze the fold with my hand so that a crease can be formed along the triangle line from the index finger side to the hinge. After setting this crease, I re-fold the glove and form a similar crease from the thumb side of the triangle to the hinge. The final step is to re-fold the glove so a crease can be formed from the center of the web crotch to the hinge. When finished with these steps you should be able to see three distinct creases fanning out from the hinge to the web crotch. After completing these steps (about 20 minutes) put the glove on your hand and close it a few times. You should be able to feel a difference in the way the glove responds. The more you repeat these excercises, the more responsive your glove will be. I may reapply some Glove Stuff® in a few days, but it is not necessary to use it in excess. I do not apply it to any other areas on a new glove. New leather should be clean and moist from the factory.

    After this, I place a softball or comparably sized lump in it, wrap it with a rag, and wait a few days, occasionally working/pressing on the glove at the hinge to loosen it if it seems a bit too stiff. Since you don't have much time, you might accelerate the process by adding the goo three more times at three day intervals. Give it a day to work in, then go out and use it as much as possible, asking your coach to cut you some slack for the first ten days while it loosens up. Keep a ball in it at all times when not using it, so you don't end up with a no-pocket, pancake glove when it loosens. One thing that I do that most folks don't mention is to lightly goop the outside of the glove as well. You can goop the pocket all you want, but if the outside is still stiff, the glove can't flex. And it helps protect the glove.

    Remember, it's your glove and you have to be happy with its feel. Quality and "pre-softening" now available on some glove may invoke differences in the break-in techniques that may be necessary from glove to glove. I'd stop doing any "heavy" oiling/gooping of the glove well before the glove is completely softened to your liking. The last bit of softening should be just you catching the ball; if you goop to often or too long, you'll end up with a soggy, droopy jellyfish on the end of your arm that won't snap shut when the ball comes into the pocket.

    It's a special process getting to know your glove. I've had a grand total of four gloves over the forty-two years I've been playing ball (I still have the last two.) They're good friends.

    By the way, I know you love Brooks, as do I, and I saw one of his game gloves at a traveling Hall of Fame exhibit a few months ago. He would slightly bend over the tips of his glove fingers -- say the last two inches or so -- presumably to reduce the risk that the ball could "sno-cone" out the end. He talks a little about his glove in his "blog" here: http://brooks.mlblogs.com/
    sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ursa Major
      It's a special process getting to know your glove. I've had a grand total of four gloves over the forty-two years I've been playing ball (I still have the last two.) They're good friends.
      My high school team calls mine "Old Ronnie." Not quite sure why. I've had it for years..

      Another hint, especially for infielders would be to take each of the finger tips and flex them into the palm of the glove. This helps break it in while maintaining a good shape.
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thx

        Originally posted by Ursa Major
        First a few don'ts. Don't dip it in water or motor oil. Don't use shaving cream. Don't bake it in an oven.

        Here's some tips from a funky site with a great product I use: Glove Stuff. (Hey, all glove conditioner is cheap compared with the value and importance of your glove, so don't skimp): http://www.sandalady.com/
        When I break-in a glove, or mitt, I use a product that I've developed after years of trying almost every leather conditioning product on the market and some that weren't. Glove Stuff® is a cleaner and conditioner that contains lanolin, to soften and moisturize the leather so that spitting in your glove—a disgusting practice, and damaging to the leather—is unnecessary. Glove Stuff® loosens even caked on dirt and grime, which can then be wiped off with a soft towel. It will not leave your glove greasy or oily. It does not attract dirt. Glove Stuff® will not make your glove heavy or floppy. It will not promote cracking or deterioration of the leather. Buy a lot. Give it as gifts!

        I apply a small amount of Glove Stuff® in the triangular area shown. I rub it into the leather until most of it has been absorbed, then wipe off the excess with a soft towel. Next, I fold the glove at the hinge and excercise that area until I feel it relax a bit. I then fold the glove and squeeze the fold with my hand so that a crease can be formed along the triangle line from the index finger side to the hinge. After setting this crease, I re-fold the glove and form a similar crease from the thumb side of the triangle to the hinge. The final step is to re-fold the glove so a crease can be formed from the center of the web crotch to the hinge. When finished with these steps you should be able to see three distinct creases fanning out from the hinge to the web crotch. After completing these steps (about 20 minutes) put the glove on your hand and close it a few times. You should be able to feel a difference in the way the glove responds. The more you repeat these excercises, the more responsive your glove will be. I may reapply some Glove Stuff® in a few days, but it is not necessary to use it in excess. I do not apply it to any other areas on a new glove. New leather should be clean and moist from the factory.

        After this, I place a softball or comparably sized lump in it, wrap it with a rag, and wait a few days, occasionally working/pressing on the glove at the hinge to loosen it if it seems a bit too stiff. Since you don't have much time, you might accelerate the process by adding the goo three more times at three day intervals. Give it a day to work in, then go out and use it as much as possible, asking your coach to cut you some slack for the first ten days while it loosens up. Keep a ball in it at all times when not using it, so you don't end up with a no-pocket, pancake glove when it loosens. One thing that I do that most folks don't mention is to lightly goop the outside of the glove as well. You can goop the pocket all you want, but if the outside is still stiff, the glove can't flex. And it helps protect the glove.

        Remember, it's your glove and you have to be happy with its feel. Quality and "pre-softening" now available on some glove may invoke differences in the break-in techniques that may be necessary from glove to glove. I'd stop doing any "heavy" oiling/gooping of the glove well before the glove is completely softened to your liking. The last bit of softening should be just you catching the ball; if you goop to often or too long, you'll end up with a soggy, droopy jellyfish on the end of your arm that won't snap shut when the ball comes into the pocket.

        It's a special process getting to know your glove. I've had a grand total of four gloves over the forty-two years I've been playing ball (I still have the last two.) They're good friends.

        By the way, I know you love Brooks, as do I, and I saw one of his game gloves at a traveling Hall of Fame exhibit a few months ago. He would slightly bend over the tips of his glove fingers -- say the last two inches or so -- presumably to reduce the risk that the ball could "sno-cone" out the end. He talks a little about his glove in his "blog" here: http://brooks.mlblogs.com/
        THANK-YOU for the web sites and all the information. Now, when I try something it will work. But.......my dad and I used to break in gloves for me and it was easy but this for this one I needed some help. THX AGAIN!!!!!!

        Brian
        Brooks Robinson
        Frank Robinson
        Luis Aparicio
        Robin Roberts
        Reggie Jackson
        Eddie Murray
        Hoyt Wilhelm
        Cal Ripken Jr.
        George Kell
        Earl Weaver
        Jim Palmer
        All Baltimore Orioles' hall of famers.
        P.S. Brooks Robinson was the best!!

        Comment

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