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  • Son's Mechanics

    I posted these on another website and they generated some interesting discussion. I would be interested in any thoughts or constructive comments.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHe6x-4JARU
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPeKivxzuDA
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pquwPoQ7jwM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVCiNXkIhu0

  • #2
    Originally posted by LTDad View Post
    I posted these on another website and they generated some interesting discussion. I would be interested in any thoughts or constructive comments.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHe6x-4JARU
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPeKivxzuDA
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pquwPoQ7jwM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVCiNXkIhu0
    They look solid to me.
    Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

    I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
      They look solid to me.
      One of the items I learned this past weekend at our clinic - or maybe it's just an observation - is the importance of the body's breaking mechanism to protect young arms. One item I see in the above clips is the finish seems so "losey goosey" that the motion may be proned to injury. I would like to see what Coach45's opinion is.
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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      • #4
        I would never profess to know 1/2 as much as Coach45, Chris O'Leary, et al:

        I thought I noticed a strange arm angle at toe-touch. Take a look at the front-view and rear-view videos, and it appears that his arm is tilted inward so that the ball is near his ear. It's a little tough to tell with YouTube videos because you can't do a true slo-mo.

        Twitch5

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Twitch5 View Post
          I thought I noticed a strange arm angle at toe-touch. Take a look at the front-view and rear-view videos, and it appears that his arm is tilted inward so that the ball is near his ear. It's a little tough to tell with YouTube videos because you can't do a true slo-mo.
          I don't see a problem.
          Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

          I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Twitch5 View Post
            I would never profess to know 1/2 as much as Coach45, Chris O'Leary, et al:

            I thought I noticed a strange arm angle at toe-touch. Take a look at the front-view and rear-view videos, and it appears that his arm is tilted inward so that the ball is near his ear. It's a little tough to tell with YouTube videos because you can't do a true slo-mo.

            Twitch5
            I'm probably making something out of nothing... but i grabbed a couple of stills out of iMovie to show what I saw. It almost seems like he tucks the ball behind his head. I was always taught the "power position" and being careful to not let the pitching hand "fly around" so much. It seems like this would make it difficult to keep a repeatable arm slot.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Twitch5 View Post
              I'm probably making something out of nothing... but i grabbed a couple of stills out of iMovie to show what I saw. It almost seems like he tucks the ball behind his head. I was always taught the "power position" and being careful to not let the pitching hand "fly around" so much. It seems like this would make it difficult to keep a repeatable arm slot.
              What you see in the video clip is normal.

              A lot of people advocate things (like not leading with the elbow) that aren't physically possible in a high-level throw.
              Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

              I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

              Comment


              • #8
                The pitcher's landing knee is outside his foot.

                His speed of delivery is very slow and controlled.

                The hips are slow to move out in front of the rubber. A more explosive delivery would enable him to break his hands later and further down.

                He is a tall and fall pitcher.

                A better balance of lower half and upper half speed is needed. Meaning, the lower half is moving a lot slower than the upper half, and so he is over compensating like most kids. A better balance between the two would take the emphasis off the arm, and thus the stress.

                If he can't stick the landing, the strength in his legs may not be there yet.

                -scott
                Last edited by APPpitch; 03-13-2008, 04:12 PM.
                "There are no miracles in sports. Miracles have been rehearsed hundreds of times in practice." - Scott Waz

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                • #9
                  Without better quality images I can't see some of the benchmarks I look for. From what I can see these things are problematic:
                  1. He pulls the arm a long ways behind the body laterally, shown below,
                  and this is a problem particularly with how early the glove side flies.
                  2. He closes his stride off substantially, leaving no room for the hips to open. Causes him to "kick" sideways off the rubber.
                  3. The throwing arm appears to be a little late.
                  4. The finish is also problematic. Jake I think you're correct.

                  Picture-7.jpg
                  www.rpmpitching.com

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