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Marshall's Straight Driveline??

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dirtberry View Post
    The problem here is mixing apples and oranges if you are trying correlate a hammer throw with it’s built up momentum opposed to an object starting from 0 velocity. When “Over early rotation”(traditional) pitching initial forward force application starts it heads toward the opposite facing bag, when a straight initial forward force application is started it is already gaining forward momentum, now you have already lost forward velocity With early rotation, now add in the loss that as you attain by fighting to get it back to straight.
    Again, so what? I'll possibly agree that straight force application is more "efficient" but I do propose that the longer, arcing path is more "effective". More time and distance upon which to build up momentum. The important thing, from a practical perspective is, at the end of it all, the velocity at release. More time and distance over which to build up momentum through force application.

    Originally posted by Dirtberry
    ...the force applied along a curved pathway (longer distance than a straight line) also means that it takes longer to cover the distance then answer is no.
    Bill. Let's flip that around and look at it this way. In order to reach the same velocity, using a straight, and therefore shorter, path, you will require a far more rapid acceleration than the longer path of the arc. It will need to be much more explosive.

    Short, straight path = rapid acceleration requirement

    Longer, arcing path = build-up of momentum over time

    The question now becomes, which one is more "effective" for the human body? Not "efficient" but "effective".

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    • #32
      Originally posted by dm59 View Post
      Short, straight path = rapid acceleration requirement

      Longer, arcing path = build-up of momentum over time

      The question now becomes, which one is more "effective" for the human body? Not "efficient" but "effective".
      I suppose that depends on how you quantify or qualify 'effective'. The current mechanic with all it's variants is very effective at instigating injuries. It also retires hitters. On the flip side, at least in theory a straighter driveline should make it easier to throw strikes because the ball is not constantly flying tangent to the arc. At the same time we already know that the more skilled athletes adapt to this arc well enough to throw strikes. Also in theory, using a straighter driveline we increase the likelihood of being able to throw with the forearm close to vertical at release. With a vertical forearm we stand a better chance of efficiently throwing pitches that can break to both sides of the plate. If a pitcher can do this we have in essence put both a lefthanded and righthanded pitcher on the mound at the same time.

      I think you're correct that it needs to be more explosive. Contemplate this: the final component of arm acceleration as we know it now takes on the order of 0.02 seconds. It's already explosive. I'm suggesting wee need for the body to catch up and move more quickly, sequentially, otherwise the arm is chronically late, just hanging around waiting for everything else to happen. And during that time all we create all sorts of alignment problems.

      Though proving it over a longer haul is going to take time, I believe the longer arc actually allows too much time between sequencing of segments, and this causes loss of inertia. This stopping and restarting of the shoulder joint and elbow joint, violently playing crack the whip while moving segments in one direction and then another, particularly while the joints are accelerating toward hyperextension or hyperflexion, is largely responsible for the damage to arms. Fixing the problem entails putting each segment in the right place at the right time, in sequence. I would call that efficient, and it's largely a matter of timing.

      I think you're correct that the entire sequencing needs to be more explosive. The body sequencing needs to take place within a condensed timeframe otherwise the arm just hangs around waiting for something to happen, and this is when alignment and timing of segments gets out of wack. Think of working backward from a final acceleration time of 0.02 seconds...we already know this time is realistic.
      Last edited by Coach45; 03-23-2008, 02:07 PM. Reason: Added final comments.
      www.rpmpitching.com

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Coach45 View Post
        I suppose that depends on how you quantify or qualify 'effective'. The current mechanic with all it's variants is very effective at instigating injuries.
        No argument here. Only that this conversation is intended to be solely about velocity and not safety, which is another conversation altogether.

        So, looking at all of the posts in this thread, keep in mind that all thoughts are relative to velocity and nothing else.

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        • #34
          Thanks for clarifying that velocity is the specific issue you're addressing. Although it's completely anecdotal I've got two nine year olds that I've been working with since about Christmas. Their catchers are now scared of them and teammates don't want to play catch with them, and it's not because they can't control the ball. One of the catchers keeps telling my little lefty not to throw so hard. It's kind of fun.
          Last edited by Coach45; 03-23-2008, 10:40 PM. Reason: spelling
          www.rpmpitching.com

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          • #35
            Sounds great!! I'm guessing, though, that a straight driveline is not involved. Maybe straightER, such as elliptical, but not straight. Correct?

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            • #36
              The driveline we're working with scribes a more elliptical pathway and yes it's straighter.
              www.rpmpitching.com

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