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Cleaning/drying baseballs

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  • Cleaning/drying baseballs

    In Seattle, we get a lot of rain, and thusly, we play on some muddy fields. Any coaches have tips on how to clean and dry baseballs effectively? We used Baden all-weather balls for a bit, but we still have a ton of regular ones that I'd like to clean and get back into reasonable enough shape.
    Owner of Driveline Baseball - Seattle, WA

  • #2
    Originally posted by kylebee View Post
    In Seattle, we get a lot of rain, and thusly, we play on some muddy fields. Any coaches have tips on how to clean and dry baseballs effectively? We used Baden all-weather balls for a bit, but we still have a ton of regular ones that I'd like to clean and get back into reasonable enough shape.
    Kyle, I take old real dirty balls and will lightly wash them with dish soap and warm water using my hands. Try not to immerse - a light brush also helps. All this does is get the big stuff off. I then bake them in the oven at 180-200 degrees for about 30 minutes. Be aware and check the balls for a dark spot forming on the bottom, this is a sign your oven is too hot.
    jake
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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    • #3
      In college, someone donated an old clothes dryer to the team. We hooked it up in the equipment shed. Whenever the balls got dirty and/or wet, we would throw them in the dryer along with a big bucket of the old school pink rectengular erasers. Balls came out clean and dry.

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      • #4
        Oops didn't see how old the last post was. My bad.

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        • #5
          Wondering about using a Magic Eraser (melamine foam) for the cleaning part. Doesn't require much water and works great on leather shoes.

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          • #6
            Maybe a little Clorox in the washing water?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
              Kyle, I take old real dirty balls and will lightly wash them with dish soap and warm water using my hands. Try not to immerse - a light brush also helps. All this does is get the big stuff off. I then bake them in the oven at 180-200 degrees for about 30 minutes. Be aware and check the balls for a dark spot forming on the bottom, this is a sign your oven is too hot.
              jake
              Add yeast to raise the seams

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LAball View Post
                Add yeast to raise the seams
                Or add a little Viagra to raise and strengthen the....oh wait a minute, that was for the "Cleaning/drying baseball bats" thread.
                In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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                • #9
                  I've yet to try it. But, baby wipes seem to be the miracle cleaner. Not sure if it would work on baseballs?

                  As far as drying, nothing beats letting them sit out in the sunlight. And, you don't have to worry about them burning.

                  Maybe dip them in some Clorox before setting the up in the sun? Would that bleach them to be brighter? I may have to experiment on that? Probably should be diluted, as to not really damage the leather?

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                  • #10
                    Cleaning is basically elbow grease. Any mild cleanser like Murphys, a microfiber cloth and a little effort will work. In the summertime, leaving a bucket of balls in a hot car for a couple of days works wonders. If you have a dehumidifier in your house, set the bucket so that the airflow from the dehumidifier is blowing on/near the balls. It will take a few days, but the dry air will eventually draw the moisture out.

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                    • #11
                      Honestly this will work and costs $1 tops. Go buy Magic Eraser knockoffs. Run your faucet just a trickle. Wet the eraser a bit and clean the ball. Dab with a towel, hit with blow dryer if needed.

                      Works great on shoes too, if you have a nice pair of sneakers, hit em with that once in awhile.

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                      • #12
                        I'm not comfortable with refurbishing old balls out of concern that they might weigh more than they should. Older and/or dirty baseballs just feel heavier in my hand. Maybe it's all in my head. Are the old cleaned-up balls the same weight as brand new?

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