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How MLB hitters do it

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  • How MLB hitters do it

    I recieved permission from Rare Sportsfilms, Inc. to put up a short amount of their DVD, The Science of Hitting with Ted Williams.

    I forgot to put their phone number and website on the video. Here it is;

    630-527-8890
    http://www.raresportsfilms.com

    The video has great angles in slow motion of great hitters; Killebrew, Bench, Mercer, Frank Robinson, Billy Williams, Kaline, Rose, and Ted Williams.

    I would like you to focus on several things;

    1. Note that the bathead movement is directly related to, and affected by, what they do with the handle, using their back arm. When the elbow moves the knob moves, and the bathead moves in the opposite direction of the knob. There is no torqing between the hands. The first hitter is Harmon Killebrew, and he provides a perfect example of how the bat goes vertical and then flattens behind his back, due to his hands moving in, and then out.

    2. When the elbow or knob moves toward the body/plate, the bathead drops away from the body/plate.

    3. When the back shoulder turns, the bathead moves toward the catcher, because the shoulder turn is moving the knob away from the bathead.

    Since the elbow moves at the same time that the shoulder moves, the knob and bathead move in two directions at once. THIS is what causes the infamous "blur."

    4. Look closely at the hands, wrists and forearms, and note that they are practicaly locked solidly into their positions and angles. There is no twist, torque, swivel, pivoting at the wrists.

    5. And, in regard to some people saying that the bathead draws a circle around the hands. I'd like them to tell me when that occurs. From the time the hands are at the back shoulder, up until they get just slightly past the lag position (where the barrel is paralell with the plate), the angle of the bat to the front forearm has not changed ONE BIT. Which means; the bathead isn't pivoting around the hands YET. Any pivoting; which is very small, does not occur until after that point.

    Essentially, you move the knob, and the bathead follows. You don't "mess" with the bathead early, from use of the wrists. It's mostly in the movement of the upper arms.

    Also, note how close the shaft (or middle of the bat) stays to their shoulder (deltoid) all the while that the shoulders are rotating. It is very similar to the movement Epstein teaches with the "torque drill", or as I demonstrated; swinging with the bat on the deltoid. Some people say the shoulders are "bypassed." I wonder when that occurs?

    I report, you decide. As Bill O'Reilly says.

    http://wms17.streamhoster.com/firstp...portsfilms.wmv
    Last edited by jbooth; 03-31-2008, 03:42 PM.

  • #2
    I am amazed at how long their strides are. Total opposite of what is tought today.

    That video is awesome
    See ball, hit ball.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
      I am amazed at how long their strides are. Total opposite of what is tought today.

      That video is awesome
      Yes, today's thinking is shorter stride, but the upper body works the same today as then. Notice how Ted Williams, Billy Williams and Frank Robinson have similar styles of holding the bat vertical, and then dropping it (set it on plane) as they stride. That ensures that the hips go before the hands or bathead.

      Watch again and notice how Bench accomplishes the same thing by raising the elbow as he strides, and note how he bends his top hand back as he drops his elbow.

      You can't see it or know for sure, but I believe that they pull with their arms also, but the hips and shoulders are doing so much of the work, the hands can't catch up and pass the shoulders until late. That's why the concept of starting the hands early, and/or "bypassing the shoulders" is nonsense. The hands are definitely NOT getting a head start on the shoulders, or bypassing them.

      You think those swings had long strides, check out "the Mick". His toe starts behind the back point of the plate and his heel ends up in front of the plate. About a 24 inch stride.



      The video has one shot of Willie Mays with his back foot almost on the back line, and his front foot about 4 inches from the front line of the box. His feet are about 5 and a half feet apart.

      Notice how Mick's bathead drops when his back elbow drops. No torque, no swivel.
      Last edited by jbooth; 03-31-2008, 06:46 PM.

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      • #4
        While rotational hitting is the current "bible" these days, I still believe that you should hit how you are most comfortable and most productive.
        See ball, hit ball.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
          While rotational hitting is the current "bible" these days, I still believe that you should hit how you are most comfortable and most productive.
          Quoted for truth. That's all hitting instruction should be.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
            While rotational hitting is the current "bible" these days, I still believe that you should hit how you are most comfortable and most productive.
            Rotational means about three or four different things depending on who's talking but a long stride doesn't mean a swing isn't "rotational" by most anyone's definition.

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            • #7
              http://www.baseball-fever.com/showpo...5&postcount=25

              Very confusing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dannyboy View Post
                What part is confusing?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
                  While rotational hitting is the current "bible" these days, I still believe that you should hit how you are most comfortable and most productive.
                  "Rotational" hitting is what all the guys in the video do, and what Mantle, Mays and just about everybody used before Charley Lau Sr came along in the 70's and then Walt Hreniak.

                  Since about 1996 MLB hitters have pretty much gone back to the pre-70's style, except many use a shorter stride.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jbooth View Post
                    "Rotational" hitting is what all the guys in the video do, and what Mantle, Mays and just about everybody used before Charley Lau Sr came along in the 70's and then Walt Hreniak.

                    Since about 1996 MLB hitters have pretty much gone back to the pre-70's style, except many use a shorter stride.
                    Speaking of Charlie Lau, did you hear Charlie Lau Jr. in MLB XM a few weeks ago? He was on for over an hour with Chuck Wilson on The Beat. It was a great listen.
                    See ball, hit ball.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
                      Speaking of Charlie Lau, did you hear Charlie Lau Jr. in MLB XM a few weeks ago? He was on for over an hour with Chuck Wilson on The Beat. It was a great listen.
                      No, I didn't hear, and I probably wouldn't listen. I follow Ted Williams' hitting methods, which don't at all agree with the Lau's.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Netflix has film of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays in a homerun contest. You can see it instantly. Mickey appears to show a box grip while Mays seems to show knocker grip.
                        Last edited by LAball; 03-31-2008, 09:59 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LAball View Post
                          Netflix has film of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays in a homerun contest. You can see it instantly. Mickey appears to show a box grip while Mays seems to show knocker grip.
                          I couldn't find any close up photos of Mays' hands, but in the ones I did find it looks like a box grip, or the "line up with the ring", not a knocker knuckle grip.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jbooth View Post
                            "Rotational" hitting is what all the guys in the video do, and what Mantle, Mays and just about everybody used before Charley Lau Sr came along in the 70's and then Walt Hreniak.

                            Since about 1996 MLB hitters have pretty much gone back to the pre-70's style, except many use a shorter stride.
                            I take it you consider Lau Sr. "linear" ...why????here we go again....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LAball View Post
                              Netflix has film of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays in a homerun contest. You can see it instantly. Mickey appears to show a box grip while Mays seems to show knocker grip.
                              Take this Mays pic and blow it up. I see Willies's top knocking knuckles between the lower hands knocking knuckles and the first set of knuckles - just like Ortiz above.
                              Willy Mays.jpg
                              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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