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Rotational Hitting Cues

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  • #16
    Phillies

    Do you think Earl Woods told Tiger to just grip it and rip it when he was 4 years old on on Johnnny Carson?

    See the ball hit the ball? I have a 7 year old female right now who has a pretty good high level swing. She is hitting well off a machine on her rec team. By well I mean into the grass.

    Heres the kicker. She, maybe on a good day, when wet, weights all of 60 pounds.

    Teach them and they will succeed. They are never too young to learn.

    Elliott.

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    • #17
      I like the Epstein approach with bat on deltoid.

      learn to "wind rubberband", then "drop and tilt".

      When you take bat off deltoid/go "hands free", then second engine cues help optimize upper body action which demands synch from lower body.

      One arm swings as recommended by Mankin and Peavy are alos helpful learning arm (arm/forearm/wrist/hand) action when going hands free.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Ifubuildit View Post
        Do you think Earl Woods told Tiger to just grip it and rip it when he was 4 years old on on Johnnny Carson?
        Nope. That's why I'm going to ride my kid relentlessly. No other sports. No outside activites. Minimal down time. Just force feed him baseball from the cradle onward. He'll be a baseball phenom. Yep. Then he'll turn pro and I'll be on easy street.

        Seriously, though. What does Tiger Woods have to do with the rest of us? The guy's a machine. A beautiful freak of nature. I don't think Earl has many parentling/coaching cues that are useful to normal kids.

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        • #19
          The point is this: Getting too technical and constantly correcting a child's swing can lead them to frustration, discouragement, and ultimately a turn to other sports. When my child is born and they old enough to play ball, I refuse to force it on them. I am not so insecure that I need to live vicariously through my child. It is only a game, they should have fun. Only give them more when they ask for it.
          See ball, hit ball.

          Comment


          • #20
            Free

            The point being Tiger would not be the player he is today had his father not taken the time to teach him how to swing a club at a high level and encourage him to play the game. Something many parents have forgotten today.

            Go to a ball park today and the discussions are not about how well little Johnny has taken to the game. Its more along the lines of my kid is better than yours and I am spending the money to prove it. God forbid if they have to understand what they are paying for or even why.

            Being in the business of instruction and getting to spend time in the stands with this generation of parents has been a bit enlightening to say the least. Most parents dont have or do not want to take the time to develop the skills of their children but they do want to be sure they are getting the best instruction their money can buy.

            So when little Johnny cant hit the side of a barn with a bat in a game but goes to a "Name" instructor, my experience is its generally not the instructor that is the problem. (Cant say that 100% of the time) Its the fact that the parents are not engaged in the develpment process and they dont make little Johnny work on the things he learned at his lesson.

            If your going to invest make sure your investment is working hard on improvement. I would bet that is what Earl did with Tiger.

            Elliott.

            Comment


            • #21
              Free

              The point being Tiger would not be the player he is today had his father not taken the time to teach him how to swing a club at a high level and encourage him to play the game. Something many parents have forgotten today.

              Go to a ball park today and the discussions are not about how well little Johnny has taken to the game. Its more along the lines of my kid is better than yours and I am spending the money to prove it by taking him to "Insert Name here" . God forbid if they have to understand what they are paying for or even why.

              Being in the business of instruction and getting to spend time in the stands with this generation of parents has been a bit enlightening to say the least. Most parents dont have or do not want to take the time to develop the skills of their children but they do want to be sure they are getting the best instruction their money can buy.

              So when little Johnny cant hit the side of a barn with a bat in a game but goes to a "Name" instructor, my experience is its generally not the instructor that is the problem. (Cant say that 100% of the time) Its the fact that the parents are not engaged in the develpment process and they dont make little Johnny work on the things he learned at his lesson. I can honestly say most of my parents are engaged. For that I am thankful.

              If your going to invest make sure your investment is working hard on improvement. I would bet that is what Earl did with Tiger.

              Elliott.

              Comment


              • #22
                I think a big problem today is not the force feeding - although that goes on, for sure - but the number of private hitting instructors today. It seems everyone and his brother (or sister) is a paid hitting instructor. Some of these instructors are more motivated by money than in truly caring about the kid. Some of this "paid" instruction is atrocious from what I've seen. Some of this paid instruction merely watched a tape or two, or maybe attended a clinic and thinks "well, gee, I can teach this stuff and get paid doing it."

                Don't get me wrong, a quality paid instructor can truly help your kid improve. But the great number of paid instructors raises some red flags, to me.

                My 2 cents.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by PhilliesPhan22 View Post
                  The point is this: Getting too technical and constantly correcting a child's swing can lead them to frustration, discouragement, and ultimately a turn to other sports. When my child is born and they old enough to play ball, I refuse to force it on them. I am not so insecure that I need to live vicariously through my child. It is only a game, they should have fun. Only give them more when they ask for it.
                  There is a lot of truth to what you say. I feel that I am a dad/coach with things in the proper perspective. We enjoy our time together learning and spending time in the sun.

                  In fact, I have told him that how hard he works and how good he becomes is up to him (he is 8, but very bright and analytical). I've tried explain to him that baseball is a great sport and lots of fun....if you play it well, but very frustrating if you don't. The point I keep reinforcing to him is that when he decides he wants to be the best he can be, come to me and we'll get busy making it happen. If not, it's his choice.

                  But we also talk about baseball in comparison to life in general. You get out of it what you put into it and it takes planning, hardwork, and sacrifice to be successfull.

                  Zbo
                  "We may lose and we may win....though we will never be here again"
                  -Eagles

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by CoachZbo View Post
                    There is a lot of truth to what you say. I feel that I am a dad/coach with things in the proper perspective. We enjoy our time together learning and spending time in the sun.


                    But we also talk about baseball in comparison to life in general. You get out of it what you put into it and it takes planning, hardwork, and sacrifice to be successfull.

                    Zbo

                    I agree. It sounds like you are modeling a healthy attitude for your son. In today's society we see so many parents who didn't make the team as kids, so they try to force their kid to make the team; even when the child doesn't want to do it.

                    I may come across as being against teaching a young child advanced baseball techniques, that is far from the case. I don't like seeing it forced on them. We are losing kids to other sports because of this. Baseball is too great of a game to see our children lose interest in it.
                    See ball, hit ball.

                    Comment

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