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  • getting noticed by colleges

    hey, im a sophomore and having a great season for my varsity team. im batting .667 with 19 steals in 10 games The thing is im 5'11 140, so i hit for no power. I feel that i wont ever get noticed by scouts or colleges unless i start hitting for power, and that i cant ever get all county or all state without power numbers. How should i go about getting into a nice college program, im only a sophomore but still im quite interested in playing college ball.

  • #2
    Go to hsbaseballweb.com and start reading. If you can't find the answers to something PM TRHit or PGStaff. Do not PM them unless you can't find the answers. Ask as many questions as you want in the forums. If you're a solid high school player you can play D3 somewhere.

    As you look towards the possibility of playing college baseball, make sure you use baseball for college. Baseball might get you into a better college than without it. Don't let baseball use you at the expense of your education (you will understand this statement better when you get to college if you play). If you ever become good enough to be drafted, even then the odds are 99% you will use your education to earn an income and 1% you will use baseball. The 1% came from the D'backs GM on how many minor leaguers stick in the majors for a career.

    Back to the D3 thing, I watched Trinity (CT) play Tufts (MA) this weekend. These are top academic schools. Trinity is undefeated and ranked very high in D3. These teams would get pummeled by a major D1. But the quality of play was solid. In fact, on Friday with both teams aces going I thought it was equal to low level D1's.

    You can get drafted from D3. Trinity has at least two pro prospects. Tufts has one.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by baseball2234 View Post
      hey, im a sophomore and having a great season for my varsity team. im batting .667 with 19 steals in 10 games The thing is im 5'11 140, so i hit for no power. I feel that i wont ever get noticed by scouts or colleges unless i start hitting for power, and that i cant ever get all county or all state without power numbers. How should i go about getting into a nice college program, im only a sophomore but still im quite interested in playing college ball.
      I had no power in HS, 4hrs my senior year. Hit well and played a good SS...Went to Pepperdine on a full ride. Don't lose hope, just keep playing hard, and send letters and a highlight tape to all the head coaches of the colleges you would like to go to.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hiddengem View Post
        I had no power in HS, 4hrs my senior year. Hit well and played a good SS...Went to Pepperdine on a full ride. Don't lose hope, just keep playing hard, and send letters and a highlight tape to all the head coaches of the colleges you would like to go to.
        The original poster should know full rides are very rare now except for studs. A fully funded program only has 11.7 rides. They are now required to give a minimum of a 25% ride to twenty-seven players. Full rides are usually reserved for stud pitchers, catchers, shortstops and centerfielders and major power hitters. You were probably a stud coming out of high school given how high you were drafted.

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        • #5
          Here are a few things I would recommend:

          1. Stay on top of your school work (I will explain below)
          2. Keep working on your game and play hard
          3. Attend a showcase (such as Perfect Game) and get into their database

          Now back to the academics. You can really help out a program by being a good student. It is a fact that there is more money available in academic scholarships than athletic. As mentioned, baseball doesn't have very many scholarships to go around, so if you are a solid player with good grades, you can really help yourself and a program out by giving them opportunities to get you some money in other areas that doesn't cut into their athletic budget.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BallCoach06 View Post
            Here are a few things I would recommend:

            1. Stay on top of your school work (I will explain below)
            2. Keep working on your game and play hard
            3. Attend a showcase (such as Perfect Game) and get into their database

            Now back to the academics. You can really help out a program by being a good student. It is a fact that there is more money available in academic scholarships than athletic. As mentioned, baseball doesn't have very many scholarships to go around, so if you are a solid player with good grades, you can really help yourself and a program out by giving them opportunities to get you some money in other areas that doesn't cut into their athletic budget.
            Amen. TG Coach will go on at length about this (as he always does, and rightfull so), but I echo what BallCoach said: By being a student who will earn the top or second best academic scholarship package from the school with possible outside scholarships, they will look more favorably on you when it comes down to compare players for the final cuts.
            Owner of Driveline Baseball - Seattle, WA

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TG Coach View Post
              A fully funded program only has 11.7 rides. They are now required to give a minimum of a 25% ride to twenty-seven players.
              Not all programs are fully funded. The requirement is now if you offer a scholarship to a player it must be at least 25%. No less than that may be offered. Rosters will now be allowed only to only carry 35 players. Universities will now be more responsible for an athlete's eduction since a scholarship will be of more value than in the past. It will cut down on the transfer of players since less roster spots are open. Small schools and JUCOS with good programs should benefit from this new rule as players scramble to go where they think they have a better chance to play.

              Twenty seven is the maximum number a team may have on scholarship at the D-1 schools. If a player wants to play at least three years of D-1 baseball, they need to be strong in the classroom.

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              • #8
                It will cut down on the transfer of players since less roster spots are open.

                Also with the new transfer/sit out a year rule players will be less likely to shoot for the major D1 and fall back/transfer to a lower level D1. They will give more thought to their original choice. And it will make JuCos a very popular option to give two years to develop before deciding where to play.

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                • #9
                  The quality of play in the PacNW JUCOs is extremely good. What TG Coach said is already taking place here and is only augmented by the fact that the JUCOs in the PacNW play with wood bats and are a favorite for scouts to watch.
                  Owner of Driveline Baseball - Seattle, WA

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                  • #10
                    A Division 1 JUCO is allowed 24 scholarships not 11.7.
                    A Division 2 JUCO also has 24 scholarships but they are not allowed pay pay room and board.

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                    • #11
                      Lots of good tips in this thread. I would say though you may not have power, if you can get on base a lot and truly fly, that's a very attractive package at any level. And has been pointed out in various ways, at the end of four years, it's all about the education. The number that make serious money playing pro is so small you should keep this in your mind as a rule.

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                      • #12
                        i agree with a lot of things here, especially that academics are important. good academics open you up to a lot of options that most kids simply don't have.

                        also, if you want to play in college and have ANY talent, there is a school out there, you just have to find it. one kid on my high school team never started varsity in his life, but got into and plays at a D3 school is Massachusets. you seem to be talented so you can shoot much higher, but rest assured, if you want to play. you will definitely find somewhere to do so.

                        personally, i didn't get a single look from any schools until the end of summer, before senior year. i didn't go to any showcases or camps (which i think you should, because your speed is a tremendous showcase talent) and basically, got noticed when my summer team made districts and states and the rest is history. so there is nothing to worry about if you don't have lots going on as a sophomore.

                        but again, with a asset like speed, that is something that stands out at showcases and can really get you noticed. you can grow into power, but normally not speed.

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                        • #13
                          Email coaches and show interest in their program. You can even send videos of yourself so they can see and come out if they have interest. Also go to showcases if you can afford them they are a good way to show alot of coaches at once.
                          “If there was ever a man born to be a hitter it was me.” - Ted Williams
                          "Didn't come up here to read. Came up here to hit." - Hank Aaron

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