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  • Barry Zito

    I was wondering if someone could post some clips of zito throwing earlier vs what he is doing now. should be interesting. thanks in advance!

  • #2
    There isn't much difference in his mechanics. Just his head snapping around around alot more, shortly after relasing the pitch.

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    • #3
      i found this article by SETPRO's Paul Nyman. the clips are too large to post

      http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...ridge-too-far/

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      • #4
        parts 2 & 3 of the artice

        http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...ven-and-earth/

        http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...ing-mechanics/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by brettthejet7 View Post
          I was wondering if someone could post some clips of zito throwing earlier vs what he is doing now. should be interesting. thanks in advance!
          What Zito is doing now is throwing 82-84mph instead of 88-90. Throw in a curve that's lost it's hard bite. The result is an overpaid pitcher.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by brettthejet7 View Post
            I was wondering if someone could post some clips of zito throwing earlier vs what he is doing now. should be interesting. thanks in advance!
            IMO, Nyman got the Zito analysis totally wrong.

            The thing is that Zito USED to be able to throw in the low 90s, using pretty much the same mechanics. He has tweaked his mechanics in a way that SHOULD enable him to throw harder, but his velocity is still dropping.

            So what's happening?

            Typically, unexplained velocity problems are usually the sign of a latent shoulder problem.

            If you look at stills of Zito, you can see something that may point to the root cause of the problem...



            Notice the pronounced Inverted L, which can screw up a pitcher's timing and place an excessive load on both the shoulder and the elbow as a result.

            Zito's problems will get worse before they get better.
            Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

            I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

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            • #7
              Interesting. I see that photo and I think that maybe Barry sees Lincecum, and wonders how it happens but he doesn't have the whole picture.

              This is a good one to watch.

              But I'm sure Dave Righetti's expertise will come into full view now.

              That would be the same Righetti who thought that Licecum should slow down his delivery. Thankfully, Tim is too smart and won't be taking advice from anyone who doesn't understand his meteoric rise to the bigs.

              -scott

              ps. Chris, any chance you can take a gander at my son's batting and read about the change I want from him? We practiced tonight bringing the knee inward as he dropped his hands a bit further and as he extends back to his original lead foot starting point, the hands come back up a bit. A trigger.
              "There are no miracles in sports. Miracles have been rehearsed hundreds of times in practice." - Scott Waz

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                If you look at stills of Zito, you can see something that may point to the root cause of the problem...



                Notice the pronounced Inverted L, which can screw up a pitcher's timing and place an excessive load on both the shoulder and the elbow as a result.

                Zito's problems will get worse before they get better.
                Chris,

                Is there a difference between what you say above and this:
                Attached Files
                Check out my blog: www.notesfromthebag.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Nyman really has no clue what he is talking about in the first place. Secondly, I would be willing to wager that Zito's lost all those MPH on his fastball because of his curveball. What I mean is this; because he supinates his breaking ball, he is most likely losing extension range of motion in his elbow, and because of his flyout he is most likely losing flexion range of motion in his elbow. This loss of extension and flexion range of motion is destroying his arm and would account for his loss of velocity, and loss of "sharpness" or "break" or whatever you want to call it on his curveball. He also has other flaws which are prolly contributing to his failures in the world of pitching. I dont think he will ever be the same again. IMO he is a huge bust and the giants should ask for their money back. Its unfortunate really. He had some talent.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by beemax View Post
                    Chris,

                    Is there a difference between what you say above and this:
                    No.

                    Those are just two different angles of the same thing.
                    Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                    I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fastbal95 View Post
                      Nyman really has no clue what he is talking about in the first place. Secondly, I would be willing to wager that Zito's lost all those MPH on his fastball because of his curveball. What I mean is this; because he supinates his breaking ball, he is most likely losing extension range of motion in his elbow, and because of his flyout he is most likely losing flexion range of motion in his elbow. This loss of extension and flexion range of motion is destroying his arm and would account for his loss of velocity, and loss of "sharpness" or "break" or whatever you want to call it on his curveball. He also has other flaws which are prolly contributing to his failures in the world of pitching. I dont think he will ever be the same again. IMO he is a huge bust and the giants should ask for their money back. Its unfortunate really. He had some talent.
                      Zito's curveball is bad, but is bad for his elbow and not his shoulder.

                      Impending elbow problems generally manifest themselves as control problems. Impending shoulder problems manifest themselves as velocity problems.
                      Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                      I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Chris,

                        I never said his curveball was bad for his shoulder. His shoulder issues are a whole nother topic of discussion.

                        His shoulder problems most likely in fact due play a role in his velocity drops, of course they would, but dont think that his elbow problems also dont add to the loss either.

                        It would be interesting to see Zito try and straighten out both of his arms!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                          No.

                          Those are just two different angles of the same thing.
                          I showed that picture because it was taken in 2001, when he went 17-8, before his 2002 Cy Young season in which he went 23-5.

                          Are you saying that his mechanics are the root of the problem now, or they have led to his problems?
                          Check out my blog: www.notesfromthebag.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            i have been reading of zito's woes stories from nationwaide sources.
                            some swear the problem is his fastball, others that his curveball is messing everything up.
                            at least the giants pulled him. they seemed to do so when they could benefit most from the schedule, and i do not think that the schedule ought to be a consideration when assessing a problem.
                            "you don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. just get people to stop reading them." -ray bradbury

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by beemax View Post
                              I showed that picture because it was taken in 2001, when he went 17-8, before his 2002 Cy Young season in which he went 23-5.

                              Are you saying that his mechanics are the root of the problem now, or they have led to his problems?
                              The latter.
                              Owner of Driveline Baseball - Seattle, WA

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