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  • mudvnine
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    It can let you recruit more, bigger muscles into the swing.

    It will only increase your power if your timing is right (due to slow pitching or starting the swing very early). It can just as easily cause lots of swinging strikes and pushing the ball.
    I understand incoorperating the bigger muscles, but I have always considered a connected swing using the hips into the "power L" position at contact, activates the bigger muscles of legs, hips, and torso while keeping stored energy (for no better term) until contact allowing for explosion through the ball at impact and extension. My oldest son does this extremely well and for an average to smaller player, hits with greater and more consistent power then most on his team.

    Are you equating the bat drag with more of a "whip potential" of bat head speed into contact as power generation?


    As a side note: I believe my son picked up the drag when he overemphasized his correction from a long swing to shorter swing, trying to "keep his hands inside the ball". What other verbal cues do you guys use to shorten the path to the ball? "Hands inside the ball" worked well for my older son and all of my other hitters, but for some reason, my youngest has equated it to almost having his hands on his body and causing them to be too far ahead if his hips, to the point that his hands are out in front at contact and extension is a non factory for trajectory.

    As far as timing, he still makes great contact, seldom strikes out, and uses the entire field, but he has lost elevation of the ball and is hitting hard grounders, versus the line drives he had with the longer swing.

    Thoughts? . . . . thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    The trailing foot should be a result, not a teach, so I wouldn't worry about that. As always, compare everything you are teaching to slow motion video of the best in the world as a self check.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark R
    replied
    I teach my kids to finishwith their belly button pointing towards the pitcher, not worrying about the trailing foot at this point. Is that the wrong approach for 7 year olds?

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris O'Leary
    replied
    Originally posted by rkbenn View Post
    These are little kids, squish the bug is something an 8 y/o understands to get great rotation of the back foot. Where not talking about developed kids. Make it fun to keep them interested and keep the game fun. Even if you say you rotate the hips like you're doing the Cha Cha, what does it mater. Every kid is not the sale and you can't take the same approach. My boy doesn't squish the bug, he's beyond that. You guys are really taking this too seriously. If they kid was 10, or 12 or 15, I'd take a different approach depending on the kid. One size doesn't fit all.
    Rather than teaching a kid to do something that they will have to unlearn when they get older, I prefer to teach them to do the right way the first time.

    Also, unlearning things can be a very painful process, as I am learning with some of my 13Us who were never taught to hit or throw the right way the first time.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhilliesPhan22
    replied
    Originally posted by rkbenn View Post
    I spoke with a scout for the KC Royals for a couple hours at a College game. His advice is to make baseball fun so the kids will have memories for the rest of their life. This is not at the expense of teaching the fundamentals.
    A good coach is one who can make this happen. I think most on this board have wonderful memories about playing ball. My best times were always having fun and learning more about the game.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Yeah but squish the bug is not a fundamental. I can get in my stance and do the watusi bug squish back and forth with my foot without ever moving my pelvis or anything else. If you are saying any given hitting cue, such as squish the bug, can be golden any given day with any given kid, sure. But squish the bug is an especially problematic cue. I'm sure you can come up with a more accurate cue and still keep it fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • rkbenn
    replied
    Originally posted by cosmo34 View Post
    I'm slightly upset that we share the same name.

    I think you don't have an understanding of what "squish the bug" really means. If you did, you would be running away from it like the plague.
    These are little kids, squish the bug is something an 8 y/o understands to get great rotation of the back foot. Where not talking about developed kids. Make it fun to keep them interested and keep the game fun. Even if you say you rotate the hips like you're doing the Cha Cha, what does it mater. Every kid is not the sale and you can't take the same approach. My boy doesn't squish the bug, he's beyond that. You guys are really taking this too seriously. If they kid was 10, or 12 or 15, I'd take a different approach depending on the kid. One size doesn't fit all.

    I spoke with a scout for the KC Royals for a couple hours at a College game. His advice is to make baseball fun so the kids will have memories for the rest of their life. This is not at the expense of teaching the fundamentals.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    I'm kind of scratching my head on how bat drag increases power.

    Thanks,
    MV9


    .
    Bat draggers often show excellent power even for smaller hitters. Problem is their swing generally takes about 7 frames (between 6 and 7 for the stronger hitters) from first move of the bat head into the swing plane till contact. Because of this they have to make their decision early and so they make correct decisions less often given they have less information. They will look very good and show tantalizing power and then break your heart with inconsistency when the pitchers start throwing hard and changing speeds and spins. Even against good pitching they will occassionally bang it far.

    I should add when I say frames I'm talking about frames in a standard 30 fps video. Best hitters in the world are four frames. Sometimes even slightly less. Five frames will get you a great hs career and quite a bit of success in college.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris O'Leary
    replied
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    Chris, I've read where you've written this in the past and I'm intersted in hearing more of your thoughts on this. I'm kind of scratching my head on how bat drag increases power.
    It can let you recruit more, bigger muscles into the swing.


    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    Edit: I've recently picked some up in my youngest son's swing via Sports Motion video and never associated it with power; he seems to have lost some.
    It will only increase your power if your timing is right (due to slow pitching or starting the swing very early). It can just as easily cause lots of swinging strikes and pushing the ball.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris O'Leary
    replied
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    Chris, I've read where you've written this in the past and I'm intersted in hearing more of your thoughts on this. I'm kind of scratching my head on how bat drag increases power.
    It can let you recruit more, bigger muscles into the swing.


    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    Edit: I've recently picked some up in my youngest son's swing via Sports Motion video and never associated it with power; he seems to have lost some.
    It will only increase your power if your timing is right (due to slow pitching or starting the swing very early). It can just as easily cause lots of swinging strikes and pushing the ball.

    Leave a comment:


  • Baseball gLove
    replied
    Originally posted by kylebee View Post
    Heh heh, I like the red circle in the last photo.
    Thanks. The scary part is that it was hit into a 15-25 mph wind.

    Leave a comment:


  • kylebee
    replied
    Originally posted by Baseball gLove View Post
    This one is 8 years old too. No squishing the bug here either.
    Heh heh, I like the red circle in the last photo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Baseball gLove
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    8Us are second graders.

    The kids on my rec team are plenty capable of getting decent hip rotation.
    This one is 8 years old too. No squishing the bug here either.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Baseball gLove; 05-28-2008, 11:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mudvnine
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
    4. On the plus side, he shows less bat drag than most. Of course, this may be limiting his power at this age.
    Chris, I've read where you've written this in the past and I'm intersted in hearing more of your thoughts on this. I'm kind of scratching my head on how bat drag increases power.

    Thanks,
    MV9


    Edit: I've recently picked some up in my youngest son's swing via Sports Motion video and never associated it with power; he seems to have lost some.
    Last edited by mudvnine; 05-28-2008, 11:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • StraightGrain11
    replied
    Tell him to "finish high with [his] hands".

    Leave a comment:

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