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  • hittin the curveball

    i have trouble hitting the curveball this past summer and now as we started the high school season. my problem is that i either dont pick up the spin soon enough or at all or i am WAY out in front. ne suggestions or pointers?

  • #2
    Originally posted by wilbur775
    i have trouble hitting the curveball this past summer and now as we started the high school season. my problem is that i either dont pick up the spin soon enough or at all or i am WAY out in front. ne suggestions or pointers?
    Just part of the game my friend. I suggest you find a way to get a pitching machine with 2 wheels that will throw curveballs or get a coach to throw you curveballs, then mix in fastballs. You just need some practice.

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    • #3
      I always try to look at the snap of the wrist. It gives me a little extra time to know it's going to be the breaking stuff before I see the spin well. You have to pay really close attention though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hiddengem
        Just part of the game my friend. I suggest you find a way to get a pitching machine with 2 wheels that will throw curveballs or get a coach to throw you curveballs, then mix in fastballs. You just need some practice.
        HG

        Have you heard about that new pitching machine that mixes up the pitches.

        Called Home Plate or something close to that.

        Rather expensive but if I owned a facility I'd sure look into it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wilbur775
          i have trouble hitting the curveball this past summer and now as we started the high school season. my problem is that i either dont pick up the spin soon enough or at all or i am WAY out in front. ne suggestions or pointers?
          Ask yourself why you're out front. Are you always sitting on the heater?...don't. Know the pitcher and the count.

          The most important thing is to trust your hands. Trust your ability to get the hands to the ball, no matter what he throws. Every hitter gets fooled, like HG mentioned, it's part of the game. That's the pitchers goal, is to disrupt your timing and balance. So, you should focus on minimizing how effective his results are.

          No need to be jumping at the ball, stay balanced and let it come to you; swing "quick," not "hard." Even if you get fooled, keeping your hands back will give you a slight margin of error, and you'll be able to make an adjustment from there to make solid contact.

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          • #6
            While you work on whatever mechanics you need to, I suggest you keep the mental approach in mind.

            Don't swing at a curve (unless your coach has put a play on) with less than two strikes. Yes, I know that identifying the curve is one of the problems you have mentioned, but knowing that you are not going to swing with less than two strikes often makes you less anxious and better able to see what's coming. Few if any pitchers at the high school level can throw three curve balls in a row for strikes. They make their living by having you chase curves out of the zone. Don't help them out.

            Know what the pitchers in your area commonly throw in certain counts. In most high school games, if the count is 0-2, you can bet the farm that a curve is coming. More importantly, identify what the curve ball is to that particular pitcher: is it his go to pitch when he has to have a strike? (probably not); is it his strikeout pitch? (more likely). Know that almost 100% of the time, a pitcher who misses with a curve will come back with a fastball (that's asssuming, of course, that you didn't chase the curve out of the zone and swing at it). Certain counts are fastball counts. Know them. Do some pitchers pitch against the count? Sure. They're the tough ones. So what? Sometimes the pitcher is going to get you out. But sometimes, you're going to hammer the pitcher too.

            Someone (Hank Aaron?) said that the best way to hit the curve is to always make sure you hit the fastball. Lot of truth to that. It will be a rare at bat when you don't get a hittable fastball. Make the most of it. Sometime back, I saw a good interview with Ichiro about his approach to hitting. He said that he concentrates on handling the pitches he feels that he ought to hit. He admitted that pitchers can strike him out because there are some pitches he's not good at hitting. Fact of life. But he judges his success at the plate by how well he does handle the pitches he feels he should hit.

            I think that's a great approach. Don't give up on the curve, but recognize that it's not your best pitch to hit. Gear your approach to handling those pitches you should hit. You will have tremendous success. Keep studying that curve, and pretty soon you'll be hitting those too (at least the bad ones; a really good curve is tough for anybody from MLB on down).

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            • #7
              I wish it was as simple as using optimal mechanics to build a quicker (5 frame) swing so that you can afford to wait and gain more pitch telemetry.

              It is NOT that simple.

              But that IS a big part of it.

              Regards,

              Scott

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              • #8
                very much agree.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sorpe
                  Someone (Hank Aaron?) said that the best way to hit the curve is to always make sure you hit the fastball. Lot of truth to that. It will be a rare at bat when you don't get a hittable fastball. Make the most of it. Sometime back, I saw a good interview with Ichiro about his approach to hitting. He said that he concentrates on handling the pitches he feels that he ought to hit. He admitted that pitchers can strike him out because there are some pitches he's not good at hitting. Fact of life. But he judges his success at the plate by how well he does handle the pitches he feels he should hit.
                  i agree, you can't sit back thinking about the count and expecting fastball or curve...i always had a problem picking it up too until i decided to relax and sit fastball-but keeping my weight back and practicing picking up pitches quicker during batting practice

                  something small-build up your forearm strength and if you still have a problem picking up the curve that might help you check your swing better if you realize the curve late and it's diving out of the zone

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ohfor
                    HG

                    Have you heard about that new pitching machine that mixes up the pitches.

                    Called Home Plate or something close to that.

                    Rather expensive but if I owned a facility I'd sure look into it.

                    yea my team's fasility has one of those. their really nice. they can throw up to 70 mph and it has different sequences of pitches that you can select. like you can have it throw an outside fastball, then an inside fastball a curve, and a splitter. its really cool.

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                    • #11
                      Some said that Hank Aaron said that the best way to hit the curve ball was not to miss the fast ball. Actually, I've heard that from several pro ballplayers and it's very true. You're not supposed to hit a curve ball. Besides, a great curve ball can't be hit.
                      The real problem is "how do you hit anything that's off-speed".
                      Sitting back is the best once you're at the plate. Be patient.
                      How do you practice for off-speed? One of the tricks that I saw for the first time at an Oakland spring camp was to have the thrower behind the plate. The batter looks down at the plate and waits to find the ball. The thrower generally soft tosses the ball to the low away spot but mixes it up a bit.
                      One interesting side to this - Jose Canseco was shown this drill by Dave McKay and walked off the diamond saying he wasn't doing anything like that. That doesn't mean the drill is no good, it means Canseco was a jerk.
                      Baseball Drills

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