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  • hiddengem
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
    Gehrig was notorious for getting "on top of" high pitches.
    There you have it. Nice Visual.

    Leave a comment:


  • ssarge
    replied
    Tom:

    I have either got the wrong URL for Nathan's site (meaning he has changed URLs), or the site is down.

    I don't think I have previously downloaded this presentation. Do you happen to have it? If so, can you eMail to me, and I will post the relevant slide?

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • fungo22
    replied
    Originally posted by tom.guerry
    Scott-

    Is there any way you can link or show Nathan's illustration of "offset" at contact from his UW talk last halloween for hiddengem ?

    I think that is a good visual/image to have when thinking about how to get tha ball to carry. You need to get the ball in the air,but not too much and with underspin.

    Then you can figure out what bathead trjectory will accomplish this that is within the hitters' ability.
    It would seem to me that the bat impinging on the ball anywhere south of the equator would both get it in the air and create backspin.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom.guerry
    replied
    Scott-

    Is there any way you can link or show Nathan's illustration of "offset" at contact from his UW talk last halloween for hiddengem ?

    I think that is a good visual/image to have when thinking about how to get tha ball to carry. You need to get the ball in the air,but not too much and with underspin.

    Then you can figure out what bathead trjectory will accomplish this that is within the hitters' ability.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sultan_1895-1948
    replied
    Originally posted by hiddengem
    I just think on certain pitches, maybe balls a bit higher in the zone that you need to think about getting on top of the ball a bit more(unless you are stiving to hit like Edmonds who hits moon balls), which is going to cause a lower finish. Obviously on balls lower in the zone the finish is going to be higher.
    Gehrig was notorious for getting "on top of" high pitches.
    Attached Files

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  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by hiddengem
    I don't know...maybe Sheff was really trying to lift the ball on one swing, and on the other he was really trying to get on top of the ball and keep the ball low.
    Maybe. To me, it looked like he made a last minute adjustment on the sinking pitch and put his best swing on the straight fastball. I'll send you the clips when I get back on a high speed connection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by hiddengem
    Its not really something you can practice. Much of it is an inate gift that certain guys have, as is having a "knack" for getting hits.

    If I do one drill that might come close to being in a position of being fooled it would be where I stand on my front leg and hit balls off a T. Simulating, me having to hit a ball with my hands only because I've been fooled and am out in front.
    The first sentence is what I was trying to say. The drill is interesting. I'll try it.

    Leave a comment:


  • hiddengem
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark H
    HiddenGem,

    OK, just looked at two Sheffield clips. Neither were high balls. One swing and finish was flat and low relative to the ground and the other was and uppercut with a high finish relative to the ground. Now what?
    I don't know...maybe Sheff was really trying to lift the ball on one swing, and on the other he was really trying to get on top of the ball and keep the ball low.

    Leave a comment:


  • hiddengem
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark H
    I follow you up till the last seven words. One swing plane...on rails works for me. I thought I understood you to say the swing plane should be different than the shoulder rotation plane or should be pushed down just at contact or some such in order to produce backspin? Or are you just arguing for a more upright axis of rotation/flatter, relative to the ground, swing plane?
    I just think on certain pitches, maybe balls a bit higher in the zone that you need to think about getting on top of the ball a bit more(unless you are stiving to hit like Edmonds who hits moon balls), which is going to cause a lower finish. Obviously on balls lower in the zone the finish is going to be higher.

    Leave a comment:


  • hiddengem
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark H
    No doubt. So do you practice it and if so how?
    Its not really something you can practice. Much of it is an inate gift that certain guys have, as is having a "knack" for getting hits.

    If I do one drill that might come close to being in a position of being fooled it would be where I stand on my front leg and hit balls off a T. Simulating, me having to hit a ball with my hands only because I've been fooled and am out in front.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    HiddenGem,

    OK, just looked at two Sheffield clips. Neither were high balls. One swing and finish was flat and low relative to the ground and the other was and uppercut with a high finish relative to the ground. Now what?

    When my DSL starts working again I'll send the two clips to anyone who wants them. I'm back to dial up right now. Terrible.

    Went back and looked at the clips again. Low flat finish looked like an adjustment to a late sink. I do think I see an adjustment made with the hands/arms with the swing plane leaving the shoulder rotation plane and flattening out. And yes he did hit the heck out of a ground ball. Ate the left fielder up the way you see a shorstop getting eat up on something too hot to handle. Pretty funny. Still, it looked like an adjustment to a pitch he was fooled on. On the fastball, he stayed connected and had what many would term a monster uppercut with a swing plane parallel to shoulder rotation. Seeing the ball come off the bat and given the clip came from "baseball tonight", I'd say it's a given it left the field.
    Last edited by Mark H; 03-18-2006, 07:25 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by hiddengem
    Swing all the way through the ball as if the head of the bat is on rails. Watch again, Barry's swing plane in this video..he doesn't abrubtly lift and finish this swing high. His bat just stays on the swing plane (rails) and finishes quite low in my opinion.


    .
    I follow you up till the last seven words. One swing plane...on rails works for me. I thought I understood you to say the swing plane should be different than the shoulder rotation plane or should be pushed down just at contact or some such in order to produce backspin? Or are you just arguing for a more upright axis of rotation/flatter, relative to the ground, swing plane?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by dannyboy
    Mark,





    Mark, what is your reaction to the following quote?:
    “The baseball swing is a hard push-swing. You are pushing right through the impact area, about six to eight inches on a plane with the flight of the ball.”.
    What's your point Ray?









    Originally posted by dannyboy

    “Staying connected defines it.” I was looking for something a little less abstract, more concrete, a physical anatomical positioning. Something along the lines of that given by chesspirate..

    A question doesn't always have the answer you expect. Everyone's box is a little different. The thing is, don't collapse it and leave the hands behind when you start rotating. Don't push them ahead, down etc. IOW, don't disconnect.






    Originally posted by dannyboy

    Do you agree with his physical description? Does “the box’ only involve the lead arm? .
    No, but that's trying to cut the bread too thin. Maintain connection. Especially early.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by hiddengem
    If you want to play at my level, you better know how to be successful being fooled, because it happens alot.
    No doubt. So do you practice it and if so how?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark H
    replied
    Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
    Just seems that only one type of swing is encouraged on here; the swing which is wonderful for batting cages, but not for real world at bats. .
    The swing I try to emulate when teaching is the one I see in slow motion GAME video of the best in the world. I'm on here trying to "see" it better. I think I've rarely seen batting cage video of elite hitters. Maybe a couple of swings in cages and a few home run derby swings but mostly I study game video.

    Leave a comment:

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