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I want to know some of your opinions of this...

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  • Ohfor
    replied
    Good stuff jojab.

    Leave a comment:


  • jojab
    replied
    Momentum

    Originally posted by MLB Bound 2008
    First off, some experts will say that pitchers should start their momentum very shortly after their maximum left lift, meaning they dont come straight down with their leg, rather they keep it bent and in a way, fall towards the ground with their knee bent...whats your opinion on this...i feel that it shows advantages and flaws...it gives you more momentum but it might make you less balanced
    The attached stills should answer your question on the "balance point" - meaning it is a myth of sorts. High-level pitchers start their movement to the plate as they begin their leg lift. Note Clemens has already moved forward by the time his knee reaches its high point.

    My suggestion is to start gathering clips of high-level pitchers and study them. When you hear an "expert" say something, check the video out to make sure that is what is really happening.

    Joe
    Attached Files

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  • I want to know some of your opinions of this...

    First off, some experts will say that pitchers should start their momentum very shortly after their maximum left lift, meaning they dont come straight down with their leg, rather they keep it bent and in a way, fall towards the ground with their knee bent...whats your opinion on this...i feel that it shows advantages and flaws...it gives you more momentum but it might make you less balanced
    Second off, should a pitcher move his glove to the target simultaneous with his extension of his throwing arm. Is it important that as you deliver the pitch that he is pulling back with his glove side in order to maximize shoulder rotation. If he is late on extending his glove, then he will start delivery before his glove is properly positioned to pull back, which would primarily effect velocity but also secondarily location. Maybe it is that your post leg collapse is more to blame for his missing high. When the back leg collapses the pitcher may attempt (unless you are Tom Seaver) to compensate by trying to get tall again and get over the top The result will be that he is forced to release too soon, resulting in a high pitch. What do you think of this...I'm a little puzzled with that one..........ok..your thoughts

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