Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sparks Journey from Little League to College

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    Baseball is a hard sport that weans out the players who can't deal with failure.

    Don't really agree with this but on the topic at hand, sounds like Spark's son was dealing with failure to me. If his approach wasn't correct, I have to believe either the coaches or players would let him know.

    Again, some have choosen to assume what the really do not know based on very limited information. I choose to assume something different.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
      Respectfully disagree... I had a player who responded to a poor performance, both by himself and the team, much the same way Spark's boy did. He had a troubled past and could not deal with life when it did not go his way.... Through baseball, and his failures in baseball, he learned quite the opposite. He now a Company Commander for a U.S Army Ranger Unit. He has seen several tours in Iraq and Afghanastan and from all indications he's turned into a fine officer, soldier, father, and man... He's learned how to deal with failure more than most.

      I really feel that many coaches do not optomize the learning potential of baseball and what it can do for those who have more difficulty with life... mostly because we have too many coaches who do not know the difference, and see failure as a weaning out process versus a learning process. They let themselves be weaned out because of their own inabilities. My greatest successes on the baseball field are those players who I would not "wean" out. Many of those potential "failures" have excelled as human beings.
      That's a great picture!

      My son is an combat army medic over there.

      That company commander definitely learned to deal with failure and not make excuses.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
        That's a great picture!

        My son is an combat army medic over there.

        That company commander definitely learned to deal with failure and not make excuses.
        Trade,

        I just wonder if you understand what I've been trying to post?

        Yes my boy is making excuses...... I KNOW THIS!!!!

        As a parent what in the world do you do? I'm so sick of hearing excuses I could scream. But this is the bad part.... after hearing excuses, lately I'm hearing..... I DON'T CARE!. That is the killer. How do you get past a kid that says those three words? I DON'T CARE!!!!

        Do you just give up on him?

        I'm tying to find a way to motivate this 16 year old who has just a tiny bit of talent that maybe could get him into a JV school because I can't afford to pay for college.

        I mean do I just give up on the kid and let him go and tell him the things you said about you should do this or you should do that? My God man I know this..... I'm not an idiot. I know the kid needs to own up to things.... oh my God I know this. Read this thread again..... you will see several post from me down through the years where I'm most proud of my boy because of how he accepts failure. Read post #768 and notice how I talked about how far my boy had come in learning to accept failure.

        As far a the picture? If that doesn't give you chill bumps I don't know what does. What an incredible thing that young man has done with is life. If I had been that boys coach I would be so proud and I would realize that I had made a difference in someone's life. Just simply amazing picture.

        Now if you have any ideas..... other than telling the kid to shut up and get over it... if you have any ideas on how I can motivate this kid please PLEASE let me know.

        Sparks

        Comment


        • Sparks ... It would be nice if you could afford to pay for college. But if you can't it doesn't mean your grandson can't pay for it. Baseball is not going to pay for college. Other than the jaw dropping studs no one gets more than 25%. At the D2 level they get less. At the D3 level they get nothing. I don't know the situation with JuCo's and NAIA programs.

          You son can work and attend a local JuCo. If my son did that the first two years would cost about 3K. Your son can join can join the military and utilize the GI bill for the third and fourth years. There's also financial need money. When people say they can't afford college or can't pay off the loans they are only making excuses. There are inexpensive options. Those with enormous loan bills chose to attend expensive colleges. It's their fault. They made the decision.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Sparksdale View Post
            Trade,

            I just wonder if you understand what I've been trying to post?

            Yes my boy is making excuses...... I KNOW THIS!!!!

            As a parent what in the world do you do? I'm so sick of hearing excuses I could scream. But this is the bad part.... after hearing excuses, lately I'm hearing..... I DON'T CARE!. That is the killer. How do you get past a kid that says those three words? I DON'T CARE!!!!

            Do you just give up on him?

            I'm tying to find a way to motivate this 16 year old who has just a tiny bit of talent that maybe could get him into a JV school because I can't afford to pay for college.

            I mean do I just give up on the kid and let him go and tell him the things you said about you should do this or you should do that? My God man I know this..... I'm not an idiot. I know the kid needs to own up to things.... oh my God I know this. Read this thread again..... you will see several post from me down through the years where I'm most proud of my boy because of how he accepts failure. Read post #768 and notice how I talked about how far my boy had come in learning to accept failure.

            As far a the picture? If that doesn't give you chill bumps I don't know what does. What an incredible thing that young man has done with is life. If I had been that boys coach I would be so proud and I would realize that I had made a difference in someone's life. Just simply amazing picture.

            Now if you have any ideas..... other than telling the kid to shut up and get over it... if you have any ideas on how I can motivate this kid please PLEASE let me know.

            Sparks
            Sports to me is secondary to academics. As much as I enjoy a higher level of competitive ball for my son if he ever say's "I don't care" about the game then I will tell him to quit and if he doesn't then I will tell him that I refuse to watch him if he gives a half *** effort. I personally would chastise my son if I saw him arguing with the umpire or behaving in a manner that would embarass me as his father.

            If it's not fun anymore why play? I see a few kids on my son's tournament team that are out there because their parents want them there. They have talent but not the drive to compete at a higher level.

            I'm not going to wrap my hopes and dreams into a remote possibility that my son get's into college on an athletic scholarship.

            What I will demand and expect is that he performs at the highest academic level of his two older brothers. There are a lot more full rides available for academics then baseball.

            I think you have to be willing to take a "If you don't want to play then stop playing" attitude with your grandson. So what if he decides that baseball is not that important in his life?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by tg643 View Post
              Sparks ... It would be nice if you could afford to pay for college. But if you can't it doesn't mean your grandson can't pay for it. Baseball is not going to pay for college. Other than the jaw dropping studs no one gets more than 25%. At the D2 level they get less. At the D3 level they get nothing. I don't know the situation with JuCo's and NAIA programs.

              You son can work and attend a local JuCo. If my son did that the first two years would cost about 3K. Your son can join can join the military and utilize the GI bill for the third and fourth years. There's also financial need money. When people say they can't afford college or can't pay off the loans they are only making excuses. There are inexpensive options. Those with enormous loan bills chose to attend expensive colleges. It's their fault. They made the decision.
              From personal experience I would say have a kid practice the ACT the summer before his junior year. If the kid can score at least a 25 then money starts to become available in the form of scholarships and grants. I know most D2 Arkansas schools will give free rides for 27 or above on the ACT, especially if your taxable income is very low.

              Personally if I was after full ride athletic scholarship I would concentrate on football. :gt

              Comment


              • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post

                I think you have to be willing to take a "If you don't want to play then stop playing" attitude with your grandson. So what if he decides that baseball is not that important in his life?
                Dropping out of sports because of distractions will be disappointing later in life. As a parent, you would like to help your kid make the best choices.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by dw8man View Post
                  Originally Posted by tradosaurus
                  Baseball is a hard sport that weans out the players who can't deal with failure.
                  Don't really agree with this but on the topic at hand, sounds like Spark's son was dealing with failure to me. If his approach wasn't correct, I have to believe either the coaches or players would let him know.
                  Nicely put, Dw8. While the approac may not have been optimal, sometimes a big issue at this age is not that kids don't deal well with failure, but that they simply acquiesce to it. If the coach isn't playing you, the answer isn't to kick your glove and complain to your friends, but rather to go out and work harder.... or at least try harder. I'd rather have a kid kick the water cooler after screwing up than one who shrugs or denies that it was his fault that he did so.

                  Jake, I can't see that picture of your ex-player often enough. It reminds us that we're building something far beyond baseball players... but through baseball. Let me bring it back to a very personal level. My son is graduating tomorrow from a public high school that, while it has an excellent academic rep for its top students, also has a large inner city population and myriad problems with drugs, guns, crime, teen pregnancies, etc. Here's a shot of the team's graduating seniors - including a Mexican-American, two African-Americans, a Filipino-American, a Japanese-American, the Irish kid on the left and my skinny kid in the middle channeling his inner Marichal (#27):
                  BHS_SeniorsSm.jpg
                  All but two (and it's not the two that you might think) are going to top academic colleges or universities: Boston U., UC Santa Barbara, Georgetown, Univ. of Redlands, Cornell, etc. None are getting athletic scholarships, though at least three will play college varsity ball and the others likely will play club ball. All dealt with 'failure' or disappointment at times during the high school careers, but stuck with it and stayed on the path both athletically and academically, and each path helped feed the other. One was regularly suspended for minor behavioral transgressions (e.g., skipping classes), but it was his needing to play baseball that brought him back to class. So, to say that baseball "weans out the players who can't deal with failure" connotes a too-narrow view of what HS baseball (and other HS sports) is there for.

                  Sure, the kids in this picture are in a sense the ones who weren't weaned out precisely because they could deal with failure. I know of a half dozen who started with the team as freshmen and who dropped out because they weren't getting playing time or advanced to higher levels as much or as quickly as they would have liked. But, they've turned out fine - they just found other endeavors that they found to be more rewarding outlets for their energy, and I presume that those outlets are giving them the same rewards that these young men got from sticking with baseball. The important thing for HS school kids is that they find something they find to be worth focusing their energy and, well, focus upon. What makes baseball cool is that it's often the first great team-oriented love for a kid, so -- if it's the endeavor he chooses to stick with -- the kid by definition learns the benefits of long-term devotion to something. The kid who (like my nephew) picks up rowing at age 15 and drops it at age 17 will get some benefit, but not so much as from a longer-term love.

                  As I told the high school team's head coach after his last game when I thanked him for all the time he'd put in with the kids (and swallowing my disappointment about the meager playing time my son received), playing for that team and wearing that uniform had been his dream since he was 12 and played with some freshmen from that HS on a 15u team. Keeping that dream alive and achieving it counts for something.

                  So, in this context, I think it's important that Sparks recognizes the risks of the detour that his grandson would take if he goes off and plays travel ball and blows off his HS program. Wheter he likes the HS coach or not, making something of himself within that program is an important step in getting to the next part of his journey, whatever it will be.
                  tradosaurus said:
                  My son is an combat army medic over there.
                  That company commander definitely learned to deal with failure and not make excuses.
                  Trade, thanks to your son for his service, and prayers for his continued good health. Could he use an assistant there? We'll have my teen work for free in return for the part about learning to not make excuses. :scholar: An IED doesn't care that "I'm just too sleepy to keep an eye out for risks"; you lose a limb either way if you're not paying attention.
                  sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
                    From personal experience I would say have a kid practice the ACT the summer before his junior year. If the kid can score at least a 25 then money starts to become available in the form of scholarships and grants. I know most D2 Arkansas schools will give free rides for 27 or above on the ACT, especially if your taxable income is very low.

                    Personally if I was after full ride athletic scholarship I would concentrate on football. :gt
                    Since I don't have a clue about Sparks-son's academics I stayed away from the subject. My daughter had a 25% athletic, 50% academic ride. My son has 50% academic this year. Next year 25% athletic is added. There's 22 times as much for academics than athletics. Also an athletic scholarship can be taken away any year, for any reason. My kid's academics rides were/are based on maintaining a 3.0 for an automatic renewal. I've always said if a kid is hitting .250 and getting a C in math hire a math tutor. Most hire the hitting instructor.
                    tg643
                    Team Veteran
                    Last edited by tg643; 06-14-2012, 01:12 PM.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by real green View Post
                      Dropping out of sports because of distractions will be disappointing later in life. As a parent, you would like to help your kid make the best choices.
                      The trick is finding out if the kid really wants it. I agree as parents we need to provide guidance but, if it is not something he is truly passionate about it probably won't stick.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Ursa Major View Post
                        Trade, thanks to your son for his service, and prayers for his continued good health. Could he use an assistant there? We'll have my teen work for free in return for the part about learning to not make excuses. :scholar: An IED doesn't care that "I'm just too sleepy to keep an eye out for risks"; you lose a limb either way if you're not paying attention.
                        So true about the IED's.

                        My medic son is an eagle scout and played baseball until his junior year in high school. He was an average player that figure out that he wanted spend time in other places like football.

                        He called the other day to say that he had to work on a guy that stepped on an IED (his life was saved minus legs below the knees). The interesting thing is that he told me that the problems he thought he had while in the states are nothing to him now compared to what he is having to deal with on a daily basis.

                        I worry about him because of the dangers he faces daily.

                        The reason I'm sharing this is that the issues that my kids faced in high school and the worries I had for them at that point pale in comparison to what my oldest is going through in Afghanistan. If my 3rd oldest son doesn't find enjoyment in baseball anymore I don't think it will bother me that much.
                        tradosaurus
                        Team Veteran
                        Last edited by tradosaurus; 06-14-2012, 02:48 PM.

                        Comment


                        • Never let them quit... Never force them to play.
                          "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                          - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                          Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                          Comment


                          • Trade shared:
                            The reason I'm sharing this is that the issues that my kids faced in high school and the worries I had for them at that point pale in comparison to what my oldest is going through in Afghanistan. If my 3rd oldest son doesn't find enjoyment in baseball anymore I don't think it will bother me that much.
                            Thanks for passing this along. It's great for all of us to get to know one another better in general, and certainly to see how all of our theories about raising youngsters through baseball actually is works out in the long run.

                            I couldn't help but chuckle at a thought that the bolded passage brought to mind, particularly in light of recent threads. If these circumstances make high school baseball pale in importance, where in the pantheon of importance should parents be placing achieving victory in 7-8 y/o playoffs?
                            Ursa Major
                            Registered User
                            Last edited by Ursa Major; 06-15-2012, 02:50 AM.
                            sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

                            Comment


                            • Trade shared:
                              The reason I'm sharing this is that the issues that my kids faced in high school and the worries I had for them at that point pale in comparison to what my oldest is going through in Afghanistan. If my 3rd oldest son doesn't find enjoyment in baseball anymore I don't think it will bother me that much.
                              Thanks for passing this along. It's great for all of us to get to know one another better in general, and certainly to see how all of our theories about raising youngsters through baseball actually is works out in the long run.

                              I couldn't help but chuckle at a thought that the bolded passage brought to mind, particularly in light of recent threads. If these circumstances make high school baseball, where in the pantheon of importance should parents be placing achieving victory in 7-8 y/o playoffs?
                              sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

                              Comment


                              • I'm up in Kansas looking for work.

                                My boy had a big tournament this week and it will be the first tournament I've ever missed. Life gets in the way though and I just can't find any work where I live so I've come up here to look for something.

                                I don't know what the deal is with the big tournament he's going to be iin but the cost of entering is out of this world. Each team has to pay something like $1100 to enter. Someone told me scouts will be there but that goes in one ear and out the other with me. I've heard that so many times and it's almost never true.

                                Anyway, maybe the boy will do better with me not there. I doubt he'll he notice that I'm not at the games.

                                Sparks

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X