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Sparks Journey from Little League to College

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  • Originally posted by songtitle View Post
    Maybe you guys aren't familiar with this story about a coach putting in the manager at the end of the season (NSFW, guys you may have to get out the hankies).
    This was obviously done with the approval of the coach and in a sense with the backing of all the kids and fans.

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    • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
      That is different than a di** head coach ruining the game for the kids. How did that kid who quit know the coach was going to be fired?

      I would have no problem letting that kid back on the team based on the actions of the fired coach.
      Unfortunately, it reflects worse on the player than it does the coach......if he, and/or only a couple others are the only ones that quit on the team (literally, and figuratively).

      At that age level, the new coach should let the remaining players be ones who decide to welcome him/them back, or tell them to "f-off".

      Sure the old coach "abandoned' his players with his actions, but so did those players that quit.....
      In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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      • Originally posted by tg643 View Post
        Any player who quit because the equipment manager was allowed to bat isn't committed to the game. I'm not sure I would have him back. I would be grilling the kid and making him beg in our meeting. I wouldn't chase after the kid. He would have to initiate the discussion. He better not show up at tryouts or off season workouts like nothing happened. He quit on his teammates.
        tg,

        There is more to the story than this... when the season started the coach put 4 football players on the team. It was clear to anyone who has any knowledge at all that these boys are not baseball players. Never the less the coach put them in the starting lineup and never took them out.
        When this boy quit the team..... 5 of the starting players were hitting under .100 (yes that is not a typo). They were striking out on average 9 out of 10 at bats. Keep in mind that these boys haven't played baseball in years and the coach just put them on the team and gave them the starting spots.

        The boy who quit is not a great hitter but has played baseball all his life and has shown in the past that he can hit. He had been asking the coach all year to give him a chance to bat and help the team. The coach refused to even talk to him about it.

        So it's the end of the season and the coach lets a guy bat who isn't even on the roster (a violation of the rules I might add) and this boy never got one single at bat.....not even in practice games. Seeing that boy get an at bat was more than he could stand and on top of everything else that happened this year he left the team.

        I might add this..... my boy has played for this coach since 7th grade and had never hit below .360 EVER! The coach started the year out by giving a sophomore player his position and not allowing my boy to bat. He put my boy in the pitching rotation ONLY....when the season started. This boy was striking out 8 out of 10 at bats and was making so many errors on defense that it was terrible. I don't mind an error every now and then but this boy literally could not make the easiest of plays.
        The only reason my boy finally got to bat and play SS and SB was because this boy broke his arm while doing football workouts during baseball season.

        Keep in mind all the while this is happening we are getting blown out by every team we play. Kids who have played baseball all their lives were forced to sit and watch players who haven't played baseball in years take their spots on the team. If those kids have been successful you might could see the point. But when these kids have been massive failures and the coach never makes any changes...... well it just doesn't make sense.

        Sparks

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        • I repeat: Any player who quits a team isnt dedicated to the game. They don't love the game. In high school a player isn't walking out on the coach. He's walking out on the team and his teammates. You make too many excuses. The best way to get good at something is do it. Then it's easier to do it again. This includes quitting. My position has not changed.

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          • I see your point and I wouldn't let my boy quit for the very same reasons.

            It's just really sad how everything happened and no one can understand why things had to go like this.

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            • Originally posted by tg643 View Post
              I repeat: Any player who quits a team isnt dedicated to the game. They don't love the game. In high school a player isn't walking out on the coach. He's walking out on the team and his teammates. You make too many excuses. The best way to get good at something is do it. Then it's easier to do it again. This includes quitting. My position has not changed.
              tg,

              Quitting doesn't necessarily mean the kid isn't dedicated to the game. Some guys quit and continue to play travel ball. Our starting catcher quit for reasons I can't write here because of the coach, in my opinion perfectly justified. He's now playing in college, just having a great sophomore year. The kid is a heck of a hard worker, loves the game as much as anyone. Just like in the workplace, sometimes folks quit because of the boss. I understand where you're coming from, it's something you really don't want to do for reasons you stated, but there are times when it's justified. Not claiming it is here, but there are most definitely times when it is.
              The outcome of our children is infinitely more important than the outcome of any game they will ever play

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              • Originally posted by JJA View Post
                tg,

                Quitting doesn't necessarily mean the kid isn't dedicated to the game. Some guys quit and continue to play travel ball. Our starting catcher quit for reasons I can't write here because of the coach, in my opinion perfectly justified. He's now playing in college, just having a great sophomore year. The kid is a heck of a hard worker, loves the game as much as anyone. Just like in the workplace, sometimes folks quit because of the boss. I understand where you're coming from, it's something you really don't want to do for reasons you stated, but there are times when it's justified. Not claiming it is here, but there are most definitely times when it is.
                This is the cupcake generation. Life isn't perfect, so I'll quit. Unless the kid was physically or mentally abused (not just getting yelled at) he isn't mentally tough. He walked out on his teammates. Maybe someday he'll walk out on his new teammates, his co-workers or his wife because life isn't perfect. I detest quitters. I had teammates that got screwed in high school. They also played college ball. But they didn't quit the high school team. They didn't walk out on their teammates. People who defend quitters are called enablers.

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                • Originally posted by tg643 View Post
                  I repeat: Any player who quits a team isnt dedicated to the game. They don't love the game. In high school a player isn't walking out on the coach. He's walking out on the team and his teammates. You make too many excuses. The best way to get good at something is do it. Then it's easier to do it again. This includes quitting. My position has not changed.
                  Riiiiiiight. And staying with a team like this builds character? I'm surprised more kids didn't quit.

                  I would have tried to get the majority of the team to quit to put egg on the face of the coach.

                  Comment


                  • I feel like there's a lot less black and white here than some are seeing.

                    Normally I also hate the idea of quitting, and wouldn't let my boys walk away from something they'd committed to. But this is far from a typical situation- it sure isn't 'Johnny Cupcake quit because he lost his job to a freshman'.

                    From everything that's been described this coach essentially went out of his way, throughout the season, to demean his existing players. That might not be mental abuse, exactly, but it's an extremely crappy situation.

                    I want my kids to follow through with things, but I also want them to stand up for themselves when they're being mistreated or blatantly insulted. I don't say that lightly... there's a fine line between things not going your way and a truly unacceptable situation. But from what Sparks says here, it seems to me these kids were goaded at every turn by this coach's actions.

                    Granted, we're only hearing one side of the story, but it ain't a good side.

                    Another way to read this is a kid having the courage of his convictions to say "this has gotten completely out of hand, and I protest it". For all we know that was a decisive moment for the AD to say, ok, this guy has lost the team and he's got to go.

                    I can definitely understand being rubbed the wrong way by what the kid did. But my 2c, if I'm next season's coach I'm wiping the slate clear.

                    Comment


                    • When I coached travel I never took a kid who quit a team in mid season. I was told I was crazy to pass on one stud. He quit on his next team. I always asked kids who approached our team why they wanted to leave their prior team even if I understand why they would want to leave.

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                      • Originally posted by tg643 View Post
                        When I coached travel I never took a kid who quit a team in mid season. I was told I was crazy to pass on one stud. He quit on his next team. I always asked kids who approached our team why they wanted to leave their prior team even if I understand why they would want to leave.
                        Sparks stated this kid quit on at the end of the season at the last game. Would you take him then if you were the new coach next year?

                        My 14U son quit his travel team after 3 tournaments into the season. He saw plenty of playing time however it wasn't an environment conducive to getting better as a player nor as a team.

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                        • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
                          Sparks stated this kid quit on at the end of the season at the last game. Would you take him then if you were the new coach next year?

                          My 14U son quit his travel team after 3 tournaments into the season. He saw plenty of playing time however it wasn't an environment conducive to getting better as a player nor as a team.
                          I've told this story a few times here... Years ago my son came off an all-star HS season (He was named a Southeast New England All-Star, MVP, etc.) and played Legion ball for a rival HS coach who had a beef with me - he was a complete a$$. He sat my son the entire season - not one inning played - 26 games. My son wanted to quit, but I would not let him, my reasoning was he was committed to the team and he will have to deal with idiots his whole life.... It was miserable for him and me. I went to every game and stood silently by the dugout to show my support for him. Later in life as an adult he surprised me by telling me it was one of the best lessons I ever taught him...

                          As for the coach, he's got the reputation he so justly earned - and he's still an a$$.
                          "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                          - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                          Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                          • I'm with One Ton on this one. Yes, TG, you don't want kids to quit and I've had to persuade mine not to quit pretty miserable situations. But this one as described is pretty extreme. And, there's another important life lesson to be top - sometimes you have to cut your losses. And, yes, we all will run into miserable bosses - I had one for six years and finally quit because I saw no future in his operation. Very smart move for me, as it went out of business shortly thereafter and I wouldn't have been paid. (He was writing me IOU's, and I eventually had to sue him to get paid.) Why should a kid stick with a situation neither he nor anyone else is getting anything out of?

                            And how are you "quitting on your teammates" if you're not playing? And if you quit a horrible high school situation you're likely to walk out on your wife when you get married? Puh - leeeeeeze, TG .... get a grip.
                            sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

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                            • Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
                              I've told this story a few times here... Years ago my son came off an all-star HS season (He was named a Southeast New England All-Star, MVP, etc.) and played Legion ball for a rival HS coach who had a beef with me - he was a complete a$$. He sat my son the entire season - not one inning played - 26 games. My son wanted to quit, but I would not let him, my reasoning was he was committed to the team and he will have to deal with idiots his whole life.... It was miserable for him and me. I went to every game and stood silently by the dugout to show my support for him. Later in life as an adult he surprised me by telling me it was one of the best lessons I ever taught him...

                              As for the coach, he's got the reputation he so justly earned - and he's still an a$$.
                              Well as the father you are always right. :scholar:

                              However, as an example, I am currently working for a supervisor that is a part sadist and hypocrite. I am currently looking at finding another job within the federal government.

                              Personally if it was my son was playing on a legion team getting no playing time, as long as it wouldn't hurt his high school playing time, I would have yanked him off the team in a new york minute. Lesson being if you don't like where you are at move on.

                              As for marriage I don't believe in divorce (as God hates divorce) so that is no option and thus no comparison.
                              Last edited by tradosaurus; 04-21-2013, 07:20 AM.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
                                Well as the father you are always right. :scholar:
                                I made my share of mistakes...

                                However, as an example, I am currently working for a supervisor that is a part sadist and hypocrite. I am currently looking at finding another job within the federal government.
                                I don't see this quite the same... and it appears you are doing it correctly.

                                Personally if it was my son was playing on a legion team getting no playing time, as long as it wouldn't hurt his high school playing time, I would have yanked him off the team in a new york minute. Lesson being if you don't like where you are at move on.

                                As for marriage I don't believe in divorce (as God hates divorce) so that is no option and thus no comparison.
                                Seems like you live a double standard... Why is the Legion Team different than the HS team??? A team you commit to is a team you commit to.... Just like marriage.. (BTW I've been with my lovely bride for 38 years)
                                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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