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  • Bounce Back problem

    Got a couple 14u kids (very good athletes and players) who swing hard and have a bounce back with the bat in the opposite direction after their swing. In other words, the arm muscles must not relax after the swing, because they are unable to hold their finish (and the bat), instead they bounce back and counter rotate at the end of their swing. Getting the picture? ANybody dealt with this and have a solution.

    SC

  • #2
    Is this golf? What is the expectation of holding the finish? These couple of kids it would be safe to say keep both hands on the bat for the duration of the swing/follow-through?
    Last edited by The Uncoach; 02-20-2012, 10:15 AM. Reason: clarify and add to question

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    • #3
      I don't care if they hold the finish necessarily, just don't see any high level swings that bouncing back like their bat hit a rubber wall behind them.

      SC

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      • #4
        It almost sounds like a lot of kids at the lowest levels who use ultra-light bats. Unless they perform significantly worse than the other players, I don’t see what the issue is.
        The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

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        • #5
          right. there are "extension drills" like hitting through a basketball but usually you don't need that stuff and the problem resolves by itself if the bats get heavier.
          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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          • #6
            I have seen hitters do this but more in an attempt to get back a balance issue and jumpstart a run down the line. In both issues full extension was not achieved and weak hit ball was a result. Sometimes making a play close at first and convincing the kid that an even better jump was needed. I unfortunately did not work with these kids, just seen on other teams. Would suggest making sure stride foot is planted and extension is achieved before running.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Swing Coach View Post
              Got a couple 14u kids (very good athletes and players) who swing hard and have a bounce back with the bat in the opposite direction after their swing. In other words, the arm muscles must not relax after the swing, because they are unable to hold their finish (and the bat), instead they bounce back and counter rotate at the end of their swing. Getting the picture? ANybody dealt with this and have a solution.
              Swing, do you have a clip??? I'm having a hard time visualizing what you describe. I've seen this with poor athletes.... What is the purpose of holding the swing?
              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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              • #8
                You see this a lot in MLB. Derek Jeter comes to mind. See it a lot with power hitters who "flip" the bat especially when they hit a no-doubter.
                There are two kinds of losers.....Those that don't do what they are told, and those that do only what they are told.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Swing Coach View Post
                  Got a couple 14u kids (very good athletes and players) who swing hard and have a bounce back with the bat in the opposite direction after their swing. In other words, the arm muscles must not relax after the swing, because they are unable to hold their finish (and the bat), instead they bounce back and counter rotate at the end of their swing. Getting the picture? ANybody dealt with this and have a solution.
                  That is a good reason to let the top hand off the bat at the end of the follow through. It should also give the batter a bit more power since his extension is greater.

                  But I would do some video of these kids batting (slowed down to at least 50%) and compare to MLB hitters swing analysis.

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                  • #10
                    Since you are the one who recommended The Science of Hitting in a different thread, if I could offer a tip to you, you may want to look at images of Ted Williams. He keeps both hands on the bat all the way through the swing to finish. The greatest ever. TH letting go looks pretty and it's just a personal style. As much power as Williams had, it's not an indication that keeping both hands on the bat robs hitters of power let alone getting good extension, however much extension helps once the ball leaves the bat.

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                    • #11
                      Yes, I remember Ted's swing. I was just offering something that would help the kids from bouncing back with the bat.
                      Either way is fine as can be attested by varying techniques of MLB hitters. Pujols and many others takes their top hands off. Other great hitters in the game don't.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
                        That is a good reason to let the top hand off the bat at the end of the follow through. It should also give the batter a bit more power since his extension is greater.
                        How is something that happens after contact going to help through contact?

                        The problem with a one-handed finish is that, on rare occasions, it can lead to problems in the front of the shoulder on the bottom hand arm.
                        Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                        I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

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                        • #13
                          Why don't you call Manny Ramirez and Albert Pujols and ask him that question.

                          Look at 1:55 mark

                          homerun derby 2011. Looks like even the powerhitters take their top hand off at end.

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                          • #14
                            This is the part of your post that I was discussing.
                            It should also give the batter a bit more power since his extension is greater.
                            Kinsler is in the 30/30 club and keeps both hands on the bat all the way through. Now between Williams losing almost 5 seasons to wartime service and hitting 521 HRs, Dimaggio and now Kinsler, I'd suggest that your original premise that some one-handed release "should also give the batter a bit more power since his extension is greater" doesn't add up.

                            Last edited by The Uncoach; 02-21-2012, 11:05 AM. Reason: clarity

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                            • #15
                              Sure it adds up! Albert Pujols could still hit homeruns without a one hand release.

                              But the question is why would he?

                              The point is there is no right or wrong here. Although it is interesting that all the guys in the homerun derby have top hand release after the swing.

                              This topic is about bounce after the swing. Kind of hard to bounce with the top hand release after swing.
                              Last edited by tradosaurus; 02-21-2012, 11:29 AM. Reason: cuz i'm smrt

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