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Speaking of Pitching Mechanics....

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  • Speaking of Pitching Mechanics....

    The video below is a slow motion shot of Trevor Bauer (1st Round Pick of the D-Backs). His delivery reminds me of some the past time greats; Juan Marichal, Sandy Koufax, Fernando Valenzuela. And the not so past time great; Tim Lincecum.

    Trevor Bauer - fast forward to 1:15

    The video is presumably directly from Trevor himself (I can only assume since he says it is, but cannot verify). He answers some questions in the comments and one that caught my eye was this:
    the best advice i can give you on maximizing torque and momentum is to go play shortstop for a while. feel what its like to be athletic and throw the ball in rhythm. what happens on a ground ball in the 5 6 hole? you have to backhand it and get rid of it as quick and explosively as possible right? take that athleticism and put it on the mound. thats the biggest issue with the way mechanics are taught this day in age...no one is allowed to be athletic. they're cookie cut
    He has great torque and a huge stride. I find it fascinating (much like many people have said about Lincecum).

    What does everyone here think of his delivery?
    And... With Lincecum and Bauer now doing really well, do you think the more traditional approach or "cookie cutter" way will start going the way of the dinosaurs and we will see more pitchers in the coming years with these unorthodox mechanics?

  • #2
    Additionally, he hides the ball so well, I think because of his mechanics. I believe this is going to help him even when his velocity isn't working for him.

    Batter's view - starts around 1:00

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    • #3
      Probably the best power mechanics of any young pitcher coming up.

      Look at his body position at top of leg lift. Hips have already started moving and his momentum is clearly going toward the plate. Watch how his hip movement cause his lift leg to lag back even before it reaches the top. This is crucial because it delays front leg movement and allows his body to travel further before the lead leg opens up and comes down. With a balanced pause at top of leg lift, there is stronger tendency to initiate the move home with the front leg, causing an early opening of the front side and limiting the time the body can travel before foot strike. Try to watch a clip of Bauer pitching in real speed. He's very fluid with no static "balance" or pause anywhere in his delivery. Young pitchers would be wise to emulate this guys motion.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
        And... With Lincecum and Bauer now doing really well, do you think the more traditional approach or "cookie cutter" way will start going the way of the dinosaurs and we will see more pitchers in the coming years with these unorthodox mechanics?
        I think there have always been pitchers with unorthodox deliveries. As far as teaching them??? I don't think so, it is very hard to move your body as much as Lincecum and Bauer do and throw it accurately for younger ages. Takes a lot of flexibility and I think a certain body type. So I believe it is easier to teach a traditional style (with a pause and fall) and get consistant results. Maybe not the fastest pitch speed, but more strike pitches. And the off speed advantages reduce if you can't locate your fastball. Whats that quote??? Not that this is right or wrong. I just think unorthodox deliveries are always the exception and not the rule.

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