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Top 10 14U and 13U teams in the country

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  • Top 10 14U and 13U teams in the country

    Featured on Youth1.com in a new segment called the 5th Inning Stretch: http://www.youth1.com/baseball-headl...-5-season.html

  • #2
    Originally posted by Matt789 View Post
    Featured on Youth1.com in a new segment called the 5th Inning Stretch: http://www.youth1.com/baseball-headl...-5-season.html
    Whoopdie freak'n dooo! Four of the players from a nationally ranked 13U team in our area (when my son was thirteen) went on to play college baseball. It was a team of physical early bloomers. The kid throwing 80 didn't make varsity until senior year. Reason: He threw 82 in high school. Also the formula for ranking teams is absurd. My 13U and 14U teams were ranked in the top 100. I'm sure there were plenty of teams not ranked just as good or better.
    Last edited by tg643; 04-06-2012, 11:10 AM.

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    • #3
      OP is part of the problem with youth sports. Awful.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tg643 View Post
        Whoopdie freak'n dooo! Four of the players from a nationally ranked 13U team in our area (when my son was thirteen) went on to play college baseball. It was a team of physical early bloomers. The kid throwing 80 didn't make varsity until senior year. Reason: He threw 82 in high school. Also the formula for ranking teams is absurd. My 13U and 14U teams were ranked in the top 100. I'm sure there were plenty of teams not ranked just as good or better.
        4 of 12 players from a ranked 13u team played college ball. Obsurd!!! 25% go on to play elite ball 5 years later. They must of just been early bloomers.

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        • #5
          He graduated from HS in 2004 and college 2010 - How can he be an expert in anything??? I have no problem with anyone writing about youth sports, but I agree this only adds to the already huge problem we have in youth sports.
          "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
          - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
          Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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          • #6
            Please remind what the problem is in youth sports?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by real green View Post
              Please remind what the problem is in youth sports?
              Since you asked....read the following:
              http://www.macnseitz.com/index.php?o...ams&Itemid=322

              Has to be one of the best articles I have seen in years ....definitely a MUST read imo.

              SC

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              • #8
                Worth repeating!!

                FIVE SIGNS OF A NIGHTMARE SPORTS PARENT

                Nearly 75 percent of kids who play organized sports quit by age 13. Some find that their skill level hits a plateau and the game is no longer fun. Others simply discover other interests. But too many promising young athletes turn away from sports because their parents become insufferable.

                Even professional athletes can behave inappropriately when it comes to their children. David Beckham was recently ejected from a youth soccer field for questioning an official. New Orleans radio host Bobby Hebert, a former NFL quarterback, publicly dressed down LSU football coach Les Miles after Alabama defeated LSU in the BCS title game last month. Hebert was hardly unbiased: His son had recently lost his starting position at LSU.

                Mom or dad, so loving and rational at home, can transform into an ogre at a game. A lot of kids internally reach the conclusion that if they quit the sport, maybe they'll get their dad or mom back.

                As a sports parent, this is what you don't want to become. This is what you want to avoid:

                Overemphasizing sports at the expense of sportsmanship: The best athletes keep their emotions in check and perform at an even keel, win or lose. Parents demonstrative in showing displeasure during a contest are sending the wrong message. Encouragement is crucial -- especially when things aren’t going well on the field.

                Having different goals than your child: Brown and Miller suggest jotting down a list of what you want for your child during their sport season. Your son or daughter can do the same. Vastly different lists are a red flag. Kids generally want to have fun, enjoy time with their friends, improve their skills and win. Parents who write down “getting a scholarship” or “making the All-Star team” probably need to adjust their goals. “Athletes say their parents believe their role on the team is larger than what the athlete knows it to be,” Miller says.

                •Treating your child differently after a loss than a win: Almost all parents love their children the same regardless of the outcome of a game. Yet often their behavior conveys something else. "Many young athletes indicate that conversations with their parents after a game somehow make them feel as if their value as a person was tied to playing time or winning,” Brown says.

                • Undermining the coach: Young athletes need a single instructional voice during games. That voice has to be the coach. Kids who listen to their parents yelling instruction from the stands or even glancing at their parents for approval from the field are distracted and can't perform at a peak level. Second-guessing the coach on the ride home is just as insidious.

                • Living your own athletic dream through your child: A sure sign is the parent taking credit when the child has done well. “We worked on that shot for weeks in the driveway,” or “You did it just like I showed you” Another symptom is when the outcome of a game means more to a parent than to the child. If you as a parent are still depressed by a loss when the child is already off playing with friends, remind yourself that it’s not your career and you have zero control over the outcome.

                Originally published on ThePostGame.com, February 15, 2012. Written by Steven Henson
                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                • #9
                  What do any of the above comments have to do with those top 10 teams? Do any of you know these teams or their parents?
                  efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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                  • #10
                    Everything is absolute...Typical response of haters and jealous people. I have no jealousy and always wish the best to all. Same when I take my kids to the National championships. When I go to these I always hope I get to see the next Pujols or Nolan Ryan or ??? Stop hating.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by songtitle View Post
                      What do any of the above comments have to do with those top 10 teams? Do any of you know these teams or their parents?
                      Song, it has nothing at all to do with the teams listed in this guy's top ten... It has everything to do with the problem of adults taking youth athletics too serious...
                      gLove, if you have been around these "National Championships" then you will absolutely see the parents listed above.

                      We've been down this road a number of times and I still stick to what I've always said.... The people who promote such nonsense are typically parents of those involved or people trying to make a living off the dillusion.

                      Also gLove - Not a hater... Just a parent and long-time coach who's taken the journey and has the opportunity of looking back.
                      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                      • #12
                        Agreed ...no haters here - just commenting on one of dumbest articles I have ever seen written. A top 10 USA list with 9 teams from Cali or Florida. Who cares? I guess each to his own, but I can assure you that Getting caught up in this frenzy decreases your odds of playing at a high level down the road.

                        SC

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Baseball gLove View Post
                          Everything is absolute...Typical response of haters and jealous people. I have no jealousy and always wish the best to all. Same when I take my kids to the National championships. When I go to these I always hope I get to see the next Pujols or Nolan Ryan or ??? Stop hating.
                          If you want to studs at national championships go to East Cobb or Jupiter for the 17/18U PG/WWBA championships. There's a reason why the college and pro scouts are at these games and not 13U and 14U.

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                          • #14
                            I just noticed the link talks about the Banditos organization. I don't care how much they win. Watch the coach's behavior at tournaments. They are the epitome of lack of class. I've also heard stories they will take the family's 5K and toss the kid under the bus after the season starts if a better player comes along. I would rather been known for helping kids get to the next level whether it's high school or college than throwing kids under the bus because a better talent came along. It's easy to accumlate early bloomers and win.

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                            • #15
                              @ TG643 That sounds like Body Armor's team and another called PlayHard, they pulled that garbage too and their teams were not very good.

                              I know a more than a few that were consdered studs at 14 and they did pan out. Watched one playing against the Angels this evening. 7 of the kids on his U14 either played D-1 college ball or were drafted. 2 are millionares and a 3rd could have been if he didn't do pot. He still had a decent payday but it looks like his baseball career is going up in smoke.

                              Another kid that started as 14 year old on his varsity squad, and made all conference as a 14, is projected to go in the 1st round in this year's draft.

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