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Two-Strike swing...what does that mean?

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  • Two-Strike swing...what does that mean?

    For the many times I have heard "two-strike swing"....I have heard the same amount of definitions of what it means.

    I have heard, choke up and make contact
    I have heard, don't choke up "why change the length of the bat you are use to"

    I have heard, don't stridej ust make contact.
    I have heard, don't change your swing, why have two different swings


    Please...What is the proper approach at the plate with two strikes?

  • #2
    A two strike swing is a swing. don't change to much or just push it into play. A Strikeout is not worse than a groundout.

    However usually you don't take a huge cut but tone it down a little. I don't choke up or change my stride.
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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    • #3
      A strikeout is worse than a groundout if there are men on bases with 1 out. A groundout has the potential of advancing the runners.

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      • #4
        No mention yet of a two strike swing at borderline pitches... TRYING to foul one off that might be strike three, or a pitch you were fooled with the hopes of extending the AB? A good two strike swing is an adjective you use AFTER the pitch, not before.
        "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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        • #5
          A weakly hit ball usually doesn't get you on base. Knock the crap out of it.
          efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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          • #6
            A 2 strike swing has to cover the whole plate.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
              A strikeout is worse than a groundout if there are men on bases with 1 out. A groundout has the potential of advancing the runners.
              it also has the potential for a double play.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
                A strikeout is worse than a groundout if there are men on bases with 1 out. A groundout has the potential of advancing the runners.
                it also has the potential for a double play.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rbgrubbs View Post

                  Please...What is the proper approach at the plate with two strikes?
                  Wouldn't this depend somewhat on the situation? And the count? But in general, I think of it as the batter needing to swing away at anything that looks like it might be called a strike (I say that rather than "over the plate" because you might be dealing with an umpire who has his own strike zone). A less selective approach. Just get the bat on the ball and hit it hard.

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                  • #10
                    I think the biggest difference is the approach. you cannot sit on a pitch with 2 strikes.

                    with less than two strikes you usually sit on either FB or breaking ball. you don't adjust to a breaking ball when you sit on a FB 0-0 you just take it. but with two strikes you cannot do that.
                    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                    • #11
                      Swing smart. I don't want my guys watching strike three. It is my pet peeve. My rule of thumb is if you can reach it, hit it. This is 11-12 year olds. Our umps -- and yours too probably-- like ringing up batters on close pitches. I don't want them thinking too much at the plate. Unless it is over their heads, I want them to put the bat on the ball. Foul it off, get another pitch.

                      I don't tell them to choke up, but the head coach does. Does choking up speed the bat up by making it an inch or so shorter? IMO it is a verbal cue to be smart and take a good swing, not a home run cut.

                      And a ground ball has the potential for at least two errors, right? Has to be fielded, thrown and caught. Putting the ball in play is always better than striking out.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with dominik in that it is more of a statement describing an approach rather that an actual "swing". I teach that when you have 2 strikes always look for something away. If the hitter has a mindset to hit the ball the other way he will allow it to get a little deeper. This time allows him to "see" the ball a little longer. This delay should give the hitter a better chance to recognize the offspeed pitch. If they get busted inside with a fastball, fight it off. More time than not you will get something outside.

                        The goal should aways be to see the ball as long as possible before committing the swing. I am not a big proponent of a kid changing their swing in an at-bat.

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                        • #13
                          In my experience choking up adds a lot to swing quickness and bat control.
                          I don't have any opinion whether it adds to batspeed.
                          I have suggested that certain players choke up with 2 strikes, but not insisted on it.
                          IMO it's best to coach within your hitters' natural tendencies. Avoid getting into their heads. "First, do no harm."
                          I agree with swing2hit--I suggest that players look away with 2 strikes, but I'm "not a big proponent of a kid changing their swing in an at-bat".

                          Speaking personally, the best hitter among my four sons always choked up--on a relatively short bat--and was able to hit for power and avg. with the mantra, 'wait and be quick'.
                          Last edited by skipper5; 04-09-2012, 11:23 AM.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dominik View Post
                            I think the biggest difference is the approach. you cannot sit on a pitch with 2 strikes.
                            dominik, I disagree. IMHO, in an 0-2 count in HS baseball, the highest probability approach for a batter is to "sit" on a low and away pitch about 2-3" off the plate.

                            I placed "sit" in quotes because it's uncomfortable for most batters to do this.

                            Typically, it's human nature for batters in this situation place a guessing-game with the umpire as the pitcher takes a couple of shots at the over-sized corner. The batters keep their fingers-crossed with hopes of either getting something fatter or waiting out the low-aways until it's back to 2-2.
                            Last edited by skipper5; 04-09-2012, 11:50 AM.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by skipper5 View Post
                              dominik, I disagree. IMHO, in an 0-2 count in HS baseball, the highest probability approach for a batter is to "sit" on a low and away pitch about 2-3" off the plate.

                              I placed "sit" in quotes because it's uncomfortable for most batters to do this.

                              Typically, it's human nature for batters in this situation place a guessing-game with the umpire as the pitcher takes a couple of shots at the over-sized corner. The batters keep their fingers-crossed with hopes of either getting something fatter or waiting out the low-aways until it's back to 2-2.
                              I think this is pretty much on topic, if not I apologize.

                              I agree that in HS baseball, if not all baseball, looking low and away on 0-2, 1-2, or 2-2 is by far the best chance to be right. I also agree that its very uncomfortable for most hitters, and also one of the most difficult locations to put a bat on the ball.

                              Having said that, I can’t recall ever having seen anyone other than myself, set up the tee for that spot, and throw many many BP itches there as well. Remember, I haven’t worked with a hitter in over 10 years now, so I don’t know what’s “normal” now-a-days, but I do watch BP and hitting practice on occasion, and I just don’t recall seeing it.

                              It seems as though it’s a lot like pitching coaches not forcing pitchers to throw at least half their practice pitches from the set, even though most pitchers throw more of their pitches in that situation than from the full windup.

                              In the 13,042 HS reg season batters I’ve scored over the last 11 years, 5,803 have had 2 strikes on them. That’s more than 44% of all batters having to see a 2 strike pitch of some kind, so you’d think they’d be given some extra coaching on 2 strike hitting.
                              The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

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