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  • Anyone see any kind of relations?

    Been fiddle fartin’ around with some new stuff, and came up with this. http://www.infosports.com/scorekeepe...pitchtypes.pdf

    Just to have some kind of reference point, I sorted the reports by percentage of balls. Now what I’m doing is trying to see if there’s any kind of conclusions or tendencies I can draw from the numbers. Anyone see anything there?
    The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

  • #2
    Originally posted by scorekeeper View Post
    Been fiddle fartin’ around with some new stuff, and came up with this. http://www.infosports.com/scorekeepe...pitchtypes.pdf

    Just to have some kind of reference point, I sorted the reports by percentage of balls. Now what I’m doing is trying to see if there’s any kind of conclusions or tendencies I can draw from the numbers. Anyone see anything there?
    Looks to me that the guys with the most hits, don't swing and miss very often (single digit "Miss %"), and they are more "selective" at the plate, as their "Called %" is higher in comparison to the guys with fewer hits.

    Good example of waiting to "Get a good pitch to hit", and when you get it.....don't miss it.
    In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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    • #3
      Spencer puts up some pretty good numbers; if I was the coach, I think I'd try to get him to pitch more.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bbrages View Post
        Spencer puts up some pretty good numbers; if I was the coach, I think I'd try to get him to pitch more.
        I’m gonna try to comment on this without making it sound as though I’m taking a shot at anyone, but its prolly not gonna come out that way. So let me just say that all I do is record what goes on, present it, and not 2nd guess what goes on as far as decision making goes. No one’s right or wrong here, there’s just a lot of different philosophies out there about how to manage a team, and there are only so many IPs to go around in a 30 game season.

        When it comes to pitchers, our coach definitely leans heavily toward a certain body type, just the way most coaches do, whether they realize it or not. For a year and a half Spence was by far and above the most effective JV pitcher in our school’s history. He threw a lot of innings, threw a lot of strikes, and didn’t give up a lot of runs. Since he got promoted to the V in the middle of last season until now, he’s thrown a total of 6 innings with a strike percentage over 67% and an ERA of 0.00. 4 innings of that were as a starter against a fairly weak team, and two IPs were against two different opponents in relief.

        When you watch him pitch, you can see he’s much more “polished” than most HS pitchers, and as noted, is much above average as far as command goes. However, while his FB velocity is slightly above average for our pitchers, he certainly doesn’t overpower most above average HSV hitters. But, his main failing is this. Of the 7 pitchers who’ve thrown so far this year, the kid with the most innings is a 5’11” very well built, very good Sr lefty, the next is a 6’1” Rhp So, and the next a 6’4 Rhp Sr. A 6’1/260# RHP has thrown 6 and 2/3rds, and another 6’1 RHP has thrown 2 and 1/3rd, a hard throwing Fr lefty is a stocky 5’8”, and then there’s Spencer.

        He throws at least as hard as all but 3 of the others and he’s a very strong, well proportioned, very hard working and athletic 5’7”. Personally, I like him a lot because he’s got a great personality, and like my son who was a shrimp, is a bulldog who doesn’t know the meaning of can’t. I think that if we played 4 games a week, he’d end up being the #4 starter and would enjoy a lot of success, but as you know, that’s not typical of HS scheduling. IMHO he’s just in the wrong situation to get a lot of opportunities. It happens to a lot of kids in HS.
        The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

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        • #5
          Very interesting stats, thanks for sharing!

          As far as runners reaching base on batted balls, if I'm reading it correctly, it looks like your hitters reach base 15.8% of the time by error (19/120), compared with your pitchers giving up 25.3% of batters reaching base by error (20/79). Tyler seems the most snake bitten as a pitcher, with 42% of his batters reaching on batted balls being by error (8/19...11 hits and 8 ROEs), which might be pretty frustrating.

          Just curious, is this reflecting what you're seeing on the field--that your team is a stronger pitching/hitting team than the opposition, with weaker defense? Also, the strike out to walk ratio differentials for your team vs the opposition is impressive!: 2.5:1 for your team and less than half of that (1.2:1) for the opposition.
          Last edited by mcloven; 04-14-2012, 05:46 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mcloven View Post
            Very interesting stats, thanks for sharing!

            As far as runners reaching base on batted balls, if I'm reading it correctly, it looks like your hitters reach base 15.8% of the time by error (19/120), compared with your pitchers giving up 25.3% of batters reaching base by error (20/79). Tyler seems the most snake bitten as a pitcher, with 42% of his batters reaching on batted balls being by error (8/19...11 hits and 8 ROEs), which might be pretty frustrating.
            You son-of-a-gun. Sweet catch. I had to take a very close look at it, but you’re correct. Discounting runners that reach on a FC or the very few that reach on interference, the 15.8% is a good number.

            Ty is a the kind of pitcher people look at and say, “Yeah, he does pretty well at this level, but he’ll never do well at the next”. He simply throws the ball over the plate and makes the hitters earn their way on, and since he doesn’t throw very hard, he isn’t seen as anything more than an average pitcher with little future. And that’s why it appears he’s snake bit when it comes to errors behind him, seldom of which any of those errors are his.

            He’s a kid you can count on to not make things worse, if the defense backs him up. The last game is a perfect example. He gave up 6 hits in 5 innings, but the defense made 4 errors behind him and got 4 DPs! He’s a contact pitcher, and in HS that’s not a good thing if the defense is weak.

            Just curious, is this reflecting what you're seeing on the field--that your team is a stronger pitching/hitting team than the opposition, with weaker defense? Also, the strike out to walk ratio differentials for your team vs the opposition is impressive!: 2.5:1 for your team and less than half of that (1.2:1) for the opposition.
            Its exactly what anyone with any kind of baseball understanding sees, and it’s a glaring change for a team coached by this coach. “NORMALLY”, we’ve been defensively superior to our opposition, and its won us a lot of or kept us in a lot of games. But this year’s team is very young and inexperienced in the field, and up to now been flip flopping around a lot more than in the past. Plus we’ve got a madman at short who has the range of Flash, doesn’t believe there’s a runner he can’t get, and won’t avoid trying.

            We’ve always done pretty well as far as keeping walks and really all “mistakes” to a minimum. Look at the attachment. whipplus1.pdf The 1st 2 pages are this season and the others are all seasons combined. Its pretty obvious that we enjoy an overall huge advantage in avoiding pitcher mistakes, and its helped us win a lot of games.

            And it hasn’t been that we’ve had such great pitchers, but rather pitchers who aren’t encouraged to nibble, but that only works well with a solid defense that handles the routine plays very well.
            The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

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            • #7
              Fascinating stats SK. Thank you.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by scorekeeper View Post
                And it hasn’t been that we’ve had such great pitchers, but rather pitchers who aren’t encouraged to nibble, but that only works well with a solid defense that handles the routine plays very well
                Ahem brother......the secret to winning baseball right there, in 35 words or less.
                In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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                • #9
                  Why no innings pitched stat?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Thor View Post
                    Why no innings pitched stat?
                    ROTFLMAO!!!!!

                    WHEW! Now that I’ve had my belly laugh for the day, I’ll try to answer your question seriously.

                    I’m assuming you mean why didn’t I put IP on this particular report. Ordinarily I would, but since everything is done relative to percentage of pitches thrown, innings really have no bearing on it. However, it isn’t as though I don’t have anything that shows IPs, and for those who are used to my stuff, its simple enough to get them.

                    Go to http://infosports.com/scorekeeper/ and look on the left in the blue margin. What you’d look for is the pitching under “2012 Stats thru 4 Apr”.

                    Right now I’m just catching up with a game we had on Thurs, and I’m about to do the numbers on today’s game. So if you wait for a few hours, the numbers will be as up to date as possible.
                    The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
                      Looks to me that the guys with the most hits, don't swing and miss very often (single digit "Miss %"), and they are more "selective" at the plate, as their "Called %" is higher in comparison to the guys with fewer hits.

                      Good example of waiting to "Get a good pitch to hit", and when you get it.....don't miss it.
                      that is interesting. I always had the theory that guys who need less swings to put a ball into play do better. contact percentage is documented of course but not foulball percentage. will less than 2 a foul is just as bad as a miss.

                      A stat that I would like to have would be swings/ball in play with less than 2 strikes. I would guess that this stat correlates heavily with hitting performance but I have no stats for this of course. of course that approach would throw out any AB that goes to 2 strikes (but you have to do this because a foul is another result with 2 strikes and multiple foul offs which are actually good would boost the stat).

                      any result would be a number between 1 and 2.

                      my hypothesis is the better the hitter is the closer he will get to 1.0.

                      any chance that you could get this out of your stats SK?
                      I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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