Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

90/10 Rule

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by real green View Post
    I am not saying that the all top 10% of youth have a shot. Just saying that 90% of the pros that make it were in the top 10% of their peers when they were kids.
    What age group are you referring to when you state "kids?" Whether you're talking about high school varsity kids or LL all-star kids it's a different conversation.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by tg643 View Post
      What age group are you referring to when you state "kids?" Whether you're talking about high school varsity kids or LL all-star kids it's a different conversation.
      Pre-puberty

      Comment


      • #33
        FWIW anecdotally, the ten best players on our current HS team were all top players on the small diamond, ages 7-12.
        Skip

        Comment


        • #34
          Thinking back to my high school and legion teams, every kid that I played with was good from the youth leagues all the way up. I can't recall one kid that developed late or came out of nowhere. The best youth player was a really good high school player that was a d2 talent but gave up baseball for academics. The best pitcher ended up being an SEC starting QB and he was the best pitcher from the time we started kid pitch. There were some really good players that quit baseball to focus on other sports.

          Comment


          • #35
            OK. You guys got me. You're all in on it right? I'm being punked? There's no way this is a serious conversation is it? 5, 6, 7, 8???? years old? Didn't know the internet was now intergalactic. Hi guys. I'm from the planet Earth. Things are a bit different here I guess.

            Seriously, just a straw poll - The QB on your 7th grade junior high team - he ended up being the starting QB on your HS's varsity squad? The kid that was the fastest kid in your elementary - what I call having "little kid speed," that kid was still top of the hill in HS when adult speed kicked in?
            There are two kinds of losers.....Those that don't do what they are told, and those that do only what they are told.

            Comment


            • #36
              The QB on my 7th grade team was the same QB that started varsity as a 12th grader. The QB at the other high school was the QB on my team when I was in 1st and 2nd grade pee-wee. He ended up being a 2 year starter in the SEC at QB. The fast running back was a year younger than us. In pee-wee they just pitched the ball to him and he outran everyone. He ended up being about 5'5" 150lbs, but he started Varsity as an 11th grader and got a D-2 scholarship.

              Comment


              • #37
                The kid that started at QB when I was in 7th grade was the clip board toter in HS. He really should have moved to another position. Lacked arm strength and ended up being all of about 5'9" and maybe 140.

                I was the kid who got a "B" in PE in grade school and was one of the fastest players in 11th, the fastest in 12th. My friend won the conference in the high hurdles and high jump. He was either not hyped that much by the adults when he was a kid, or wasn't that great of an athlete as he seemed to be another kid that "came out of nowhere." But in HS he was a beast. Legs were shredded - probably had normal little kid legs at 5 or 6 or ?
                There are two kinds of losers.....Those that don't do what they are told, and those that do only what they are told.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by shake-n-bake View Post
                  The kid that started at QB when I was in 7th grade was the clip board toter in HS. He really should have moved to another position. Lacked arm strength and ended up being all of about 5'9" and maybe 140.

                  I was the kid who got a "B" in PE in grade school and was one of the fastest players in 11th, the fastest in 12th. My friend won the conference in the high hurdles and high jump. He was either not hyped that much by the adults when he was a kid, or wasn't that great of an athlete as he seemed to be another kid that "came out of nowhere." But in HS he was a beast. Legs were shredded - probably had normal little kid legs at 5 or 6 or ?
                  Shake, I'm 43 so have seen a lot since the yute days. A guy I grew up with was kinda awkward and slow. By late HS, the kid coud fly. Very good LH pitcher too.

                  Baseball.....The best HS players around my age were also the better youth players. Didnt see any kids "come out of nowhere." I did see a few youth studs fade away in HS. One of our top pitchers was the Nolan Ryan of LL. In HS he was good, but not great. One of my best friends was a year ahead of me. He was big, fast and athletic...never had to work too hard. He ended up being pretty average HS infielder/hitter. Couldnt do much except slap it to right.

                  My son is a very small U11 player. I'm shocked at the mature bodies I see on some of these kids. And as such, their running spped, agility, etc is going to be more advanced than the smaller younger boys.
                  "Smith corks it into right, down the line. It may go...........Go crazy folks! Go crazy! Jack Buck

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I'm going to brag/discuss my kid here... wade through it, I have a point....

                    At 6-7 his coaches (coach pitch) were talking about his sweet swing.
                    At the beginning of kid pitch, a coach evaluated him as an average pitcher, so he didn't get a chance to do any pitching until that fall. By the next year, he had established himself as the best pitcher on the team (IMO, the best in his league...)
                    One of his coaches called him "the natural"...

                    To sum up, he stood out as one of the top player on the team. But here's my point: he's doesn't stand out in "natural athleticism". He's not the fastest runner; he can't do the most sit-ups or push-ups. He's pretty skinny: not the strongest kid on the team.

                    He's not a klutz; he has good coordination. When he plays other sports (baseball is his only organized sport), he's decent, but not dominating.

                    IMO, he's an example of a kid that you'd put in the top 10% in baseball ability, but I don't think he'd be top 10% in measures of "pure athleticism". Top 10% in competitive drive, in love for the game, yes... A lot of the posters in this thread are mentioning kids that stood out at a young age. Did they stand out because of raw speed and strength (athleticism)? Or because they were good hitters, fielders, pitchers (athleticism + skills)?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by bbrages View Post
                      I'm going to brag/discuss my kid here... wade through it, I have a point....

                      At 6-7 his coaches (coach pitch) were talking about his sweet swing.
                      At the beginning of kid pitch, a coach evaluated him as an average pitcher, so he didn't get a chance to do any pitching until that fall. By the next year, he had established himself as the best pitcher on the team (IMO, the best in his league...)
                      One of his coaches called him "the natural"... A lot of the posters in this thread are mentioning kids that stood out at a young age. Did they stand out because of raw speed and strength (athleticism)? Or because they were good hitters, fielders, pitchers (athleticism + skills)?
                      My son sounds a lot like yours. He is a natural on the mound, very comfortable. He is also tall and lanky. Mine is an average basketball player, but he is a really good QB. The problem for him, is if he doesn't win the QB job, he doesn't have many other spots to play because he isn't a stand out athlete. Now, I'll compare him to a kid that we play against that is the best athlete that I have seen at this age (10). Tall, broad, strong, fast, cannon for an arm, and huge power. If there was ever a kid that stood out as a kid with a chance to make it someday, this kid is it. His dad was a D-1 football player, mom was a D-1 track star. He hit the genetic lottery. I may be wrong, but this is what I imagine Josh Hamilton looked like as a 10 year old. This kid is probably top 10% in skill (he plays on a USSSA Majors Disney level team) but the athleticism is what just wows you.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        My take was by "top 10% of athletes," we were talking about the top 10% of performers in youth sports. Meaning athletes as those who are playing sports.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by bbrages View Post
                          I'm going to brag/discuss my kid here... wade through it, I have a point....

                          At 6-7 his coaches (coach pitch) were talking about his sweet swing.
                          At the beginning of kid pitch, a coach evaluated him as an average pitcher, so he didn't get a chance to do any pitching until that fall. By the next year, he had established himself as the best pitcher on the team (IMO, the best in his league...)
                          One of his coaches called him "the natural"...

                          To sum up, he stood out as one of the top player on the team. But here's my point: he's doesn't stand out in "natural athleticism". He's not the fastest runner; he can't do the most sit-ups or push-ups. He's pretty skinny: not the strongest kid on the team.

                          He's not a klutz; he has good coordination. When he plays other sports (baseball is his only organized sport), he's decent, but not dominating.

                          IMO, he's an example of a kid that you'd put in the top 10% in baseball ability, but I don't think he'd be top 10% in measures of "pure athleticism". Top 10% in competitive drive, in love for the game, yes... A lot of the posters in this thread are mentioning kids that stood out at a young age. Did they stand out because of raw speed and strength (athleticism)? Or because they were good hitters, fielders, pitchers (athleticism + skills)?
                          My son had the atheticism and raw speed at an early age. But he also worked hard at baseball, basketball, soccer and football. Being a late bloomer didn't hurt him. The homers that scraped the fence were line drive hits the next year on the large field. When he grew and filled out he was an all-conference high school athlete in two sports and a college prospect in both. The lacrosse coach used to drool about getting his hands on him even though he never played. He was 5 feet, 95 pounds at twelve. He's now 6'2", 190.

                          My daughter lacked athleticism and speed at an early age. She worked hard at softball, basketball, soccer and field hockey. She was the smartest player on the field/court. She understood where to be and what to do. She was mediocre at what to do except softball where she was better than average. When she physically matured she became an all-conference high school athlete in three sports and a college prospect in two. She didn't make the 8th grade basketball team. She was in the varsity playing rotation soph year of high school. She was 4'8" 80 pounds in 7th grade. She's now 5'10", 145.

                          Two kids from the same parents. Two different avenues. The only thing that matters during the prepubescent years is putting the basic skills and passion in place.
                          Last edited by tg643; 04-12-2012, 05:57 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            In baseball and hockey chances are the kids who become pro prospects were studs at an early age. Pitchers would be an exception. Baseball requires basic hitting mechanics and batting eye to typically be developed before the teen years. Hockey involves skating skills constantly developing. In football and basketball physical development lends itself more to the player being able to contribute at some skills that benefit the game. Baseball and hockey players have to be able to play all aspects of the game.

                            But 90% of the preteen studs will not become college and pro prospects. Some preteen studs aren't even good athletes. They are just at a stage where they are bigger and stronger than many of the other players. Their strength overcomes the flaws until the physical playing field levels.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              It's funny. I wonder if this will hold true in the future. We have such a specialized mentality now. Dedicate to one sport and go all in.

                              Many of the kids at our HS Varsity team were the "B" players on our travel ball team in our town. That is also much of the same in our area in general. My son is only U11, so we have time to worry about the future. If he even plays then. Who knows......However, I have noticed that many of the so-called "A" players are burning out of the sport(baseball, basketball, soccer) because they lose the fun of playing.

                              My son is a true "B" player. I manage our team and we set some team and personal goals. We have real life expectations and ZERO stress to be the best and my kids perform solid, grow each year and we have so much fun!(Win or lose). Plus, they are actually starting to perform well against these "A" teams. We work on basics and execute consistently. I apply what I did through HS and we have true growth. So many of the teams are wound so tight, you can see in their eyes they are not having fun. Hence, the burnout......

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by theorech View Post
                                It's funny. I wonder if this will hold true in the future. We have such a specialized mentality now. Dedicate to one sport and go all in.

                                Many of the kids at our HS Varsity team were the "B" players on our travel ball team in our town. That is also much of the same in our area in general. My son is only U11, so we have time to worry about the future. If he even plays then. Who knows......However, I have noticed that many of the so-called "A" players are burning out of the sport(baseball, basketball, soccer) because they lose the fun of playing.

                                My son is a true "B" player. I manage our team and we set some team and personal goals. We have real life expectations and ZERO stress to be the best and my kids perform solid, grow each year and we have so much fun!(Win or lose). Plus, they are actually starting to perform well against these "A" teams. We work on basics and execute consistently. I apply what I did through HS and we have true growth. So many of the teams are wound so tight, you can see in their eyes they are not having fun. Hence, the burnout......
                                Good for you. I think you get it. It's about having fun and getting better. I've had high expectations, but it was different than what I saw going on around us. It wasn't "In Your Face" type pressure. I see little kids get brow beat for not making plays. I believe it's because this thought process that being a stud way before puberty is not rouge. It's actually fairly prevalent. I mean we see young kids playing year round and you're right the mentality is that kids be more and more specialized. Yet, we hear so many athletes that actually have made it advise against it.

                                Its really clear where the burnout comes from. These kids that have been under so much pressure (unnecessarily too) to perform start getting passed up by kids that have gotten progressively better. That's a tough pill to swallow. They don't lose the fun of playing. They lose the reassurance of being the best little kid player when others start to mature and their skills develop. There's a lot to be said for just going through youth sports with blinders on. Everyone wants to compare - compare - compare - evaluate - project - and compare some more starting quite early....too early. Nothing good comes of it. It's either unnecessary pressure and frustration similar to paying interest on a bill that's not even due yet if the kid isn't the best 7 year old. Or its complacency and a false sense of reassurance, sometimes even some real ugly conceit as well if the kid is an "elite" kiddy baller. Worse yet there's the roller coaster of being one one day and another the next.

                                I wouldn't let my kid go there. There's a point in time where skills and physical maturity intersect. Focusing on that point was how he went about things year in and year out all the way through youth ball. He worked really hard when he was the player everyone was in love with and worked the same when he was the minimum play kid. All that was like background noise. It was there, but it didn't mean a lot and the attention was on having fun and getting better.
                                Last edited by shake-n-bake; 04-15-2012, 01:19 PM.
                                There are two kinds of losers.....Those that don't do what they are told, and those that do only what they are told.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X