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2 Questions about Pitching Mechanics

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  • 2 Questions about Pitching Mechanics

    1. Should the wrists be cocked before release? Like as soon as the hands separate the wrist is already cocked back. I heard that you need to use your wrists in pitching but I'm not sure what that means.

    2. How do I get to the "flat arm" phase? I heard on Eric Cressey's site that a flat arm before release increases velocity. Is it something that I force or is it a result of good mechanics and something i shouldn't worry about?

  • #2
    Originally posted by justin97 View Post
    1. Should the wrists be cocked before release? Like as soon as the hands separate the wrist is already cocked back. I heard that you need to use your wrists in pitching but I'm not sure what that means.

    2. How do I get to the "flat arm" phase? I heard on Eric Cressey's site that a flat arm before release increases velocity. Is it something that I force or is it a result of good mechanics and something i shouldn't worry about?
    the wrist lays back when the arm is accelerated forward.

    I don't know what a flat arm phase is or who eric cressey is.
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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    • #3
      This is an example: http://ericcressey.com/wp-content/up...er-300x199.jpg
      I think it's called "laying back."

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      • #4
        That pic, by itself, is misleading. If the forearm is in the process of 'flying out' and is frozen in time in the pic, then fine. If the forearm just lays back without flying out, then that would hurt like crap (technical term).

        wagner-300x199.jpg

        Flyout...
        Last edited by songtitle; 04-16-2012, 01:55 PM.
        efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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        • #5
          Originally posted by justin97 View Post
          This is an example: http://ericcressey.com/wp-content/up...er-300x199.jpg
          I think it's called "laying back."
          I'm not sure the answer to your original question, but I suspect it has to do with allowing enough time for it to happen. This is a picture of my son at 9 with his forearm in that position. What's unusual from what I've observed is where his chest is. Not all that common for younger kids to have their chest shoved way out over a bent stride leg. Seems like this allows more separation and more time for the mechanics to unfold.

          http://s421.photobucket.com/albums/p...8.jpg&newest=1
          There are two kinds of losers.....Those that don't do what they are told, and those that do only what they are told.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by justin97 View Post
            This is an example: http://ericcressey.com/wp-content/up...er-300x199.jpg
            I think it's called "laying back."
            This is the effect of throwing hard, not the cause of throwing hard.

            It also depends on the arm slot.
            Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

            I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
              This is the effect of throwing hard, not the cause of throwing hard.

              It also depends on the arm slot.
              what is the cause of throwing hard?
              I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

              Comment

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