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Great Blog Post by Dirk Hayhurst (author of Bullpen Gospels and Out Of My League)

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  • Coach of Twins
    replied
    hey trad, why don't you post your big league stats for us to gaze upon??

    haters gonna hate....

    Leave a comment:


  • tradosaurus
    replied
    Originally posted by Cannonball View Post
    Really? Is his addition to his resume the fact that he did play in MLB an issue here? Who cares how many games etc. he played or how well he did? Thousands of former "professional baseball players" from every level of play give lessons. It is up to the consumer to decide whether the information/instruction is worth the money. This guy is not trying to decieve anyone into thinking that he is the end all of instruction. His blog is his way of demonstrating some of his thoughts to the public. IMO, that is above board and more than most "instructors" do.
    Uh, yeah. That's why his miniscule stats are not posted on his website. Because who would want to receive instruction from someone that couldn't make it in the big leagues?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cannonball
    replied
    Really? Is his addition to his resume the fact that he did play in MLB an issue here? Who cares how many games etc. he played or how well he did? Thousands of former "professional baseball players" from every level of play give lessons. It is up to the consumer to decide whether the information/instruction is worth the money. This guy is not trying to decieve anyone into thinking that he is the end all of instruction. His blog is his way of demonstrating some of his thoughts to the public. IMO, that is above board and more than most "instructors" do.

    Leave a comment:


  • JCincy
    replied
    Nice blog. Same old, same old... a majority, certainly not all of the parents that I have dealt, have been good people.

    I don't have a problem with an ex-player making an honest living... teaching, writing, etc...

    Sure beats the (ex-)players making millions, blowing it all and/or going violent.

    As for being a mediocre pro? Bob Ueker made a career out of mediocrity.

    He's one of my favorites. And Mr. Baseball's main theme... don't take yourself or baseball too seriously.

    Leave a comment:


  • omg
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    Interesting read.

    I know of another ex-MLB player who instructs kids for money.

    Generally these are the guys who couldn't make it in the big leagues yet find ways of riding their ex MLB status for financial gains.


    Dirk Hayhurst

    I would consider a Win-Loss record of 0-2 and an era of 5.72 pretty unremarkable.
    I read his book and the blog post and I like what he says. Actually, as a ball player, he probably would be considered a smart, over achiever with a tremendous amount of experience rather than a guy with an 0-2 record.

    I doubt he gives lessons mainly-if at all- for the money. Doesn't need it with his book revenue.

    Leave a comment:


  • mellowthunder
    replied
    I read his "Perspective and Diversity" post and happen to agree with his way of thinking. I myself have come to the same conclusion over the years. In a way, life is over rated. We put too much worth into accomplishments to only find out afterwards that you still feel empty. In fact society in general puts too much worth into success and accomplishments. Sometimes you really need to dig deep and ask yourself why you're doing something in the first place. I've seen too many people in life do things to prove to the world that they are worthy of living. That's a bad way to live in my opinion. It's funny because younger people might see this kind of thinking as being jaded. Older folks might see it as being wiser. I guess it's all about perspetive.

    Leave a comment:


  • skipper5
    replied
    Though Haywurst may contemptible for having failed to achieve success in MLB, he is considered a gifted writer by Keith Olbermann.

    From Olberman's review of "The Bullpen Gospels":

    "Hayhurst's constant honesty, his remarkable candor, his drumbeat of unadorned confessed self-doubt, and his seamless writing....."

    "In fact, I'm not sure that he hasn't written the best baseball autobiography since Jim Bouton's Ball Four. For Hayhurst... has written ...a book that is seemingly about baseball but which, as you read further and further into it, is obviously much bigger than that. These are books about life: struggle, confusion, purpose, purposelessness, and the startling realization that achievement and failure are nearly-identical twins, one which gnaws and deadens, the other which just as often produces not elation but a tinny, empty sound."

    "And now here is Hayhurst, who may single-handedly steer baseball away from the two decades-long vise grip of Sport-As-Skill-Development. Since my own childhood, we have ever-increasingly devalued every major leaguer but the superstar. Late in the last century we began to devalue every minor leaguer but the top draft choice. If you don't make it into somebody's Top Prospects list, you might as well not exist."
    Last edited by skipper5; 04-19-2012, 01:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • AdamInNY
    replied
    I recently read his latest book. Entertaining. Trying to parlay his MLB career into a writing and teaching career. Can't fault him for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdfromfla
    replied
    but can you really fault him for expressing himself in that way...think Ryan Leaf.
    He seems like he can write....I say "what the heck" if he is payin his bills and taxes..at least he isn't saying he has THE WAY..seems like a guy who loves it.
    Looks like he had a better career than Dick Mills too

    Leave a comment:


  • Rufus67
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    Generally these are the guys who couldn't make it in the big leagues yet find ways of riding their ex MLB status for financial gains.

    I would consider a Win-Loss record of 0-2 and an era of 5.72 pretty unremarkable.
    First, I would consider the fact that he spent any time in the bigs to be remarkable (under the chasing your dream and actually accomplishing it category). No better/worse than non-athletes do every day, certainly, but rarer.

    Second, I don't consider a player's career stats as a limiting factor in the ability to either instruct or have an interesting perspective on the game.

    Finally, should he not be congratulated for being able to turn an ability to write, observe, and experience the game into a way of making a living? Making the most of what you've got and being content with that should be celebrated as a strength, not weakness.

    YMMV.

    Leave a comment:


  • skipper5
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    Interesting read.

    I know of another ex-MLB player who instructs kids for money.

    Generally these are the guys who couldn't make it in the big leagues yet find ways of riding their ex MLB status for financial gains.


    Dirk Hayhurst

    I would consider a Win-Loss record of 0-2 and an era of 5.72 pretty unremarkable.
    What I infer from your post is that you would have much greater respect for the man if he hadn't given pro baseball a try.

    In which case his resume would read:
    very successful Div. 1 college pitcher
    very intelligent man (excellent writer)
    compassionate towards youth athletes

    If one of my sons had that resume, I'd be proud.
    Last edited by skipper5; 04-19-2012, 12:25 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • tradosaurus
    replied
    Interesting read.

    I know of another ex-MLB player who instructs kids for money.

    Generally these are the guys who couldn't make it in the big leagues yet find ways of riding their ex MLB status for financial gains.


    Dirk Hayhurst

    I would consider a Win-Loss record of 0-2 and an era of 5.72 pretty unremarkable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Great Blog Post by Dirk Hayhurst (author of Bullpen Gospels and Out Of My League)

    Really liked this:

    http://dirkhayhurst.com/2012/04/how-.../#comment-2498

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