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Hitting off tee -- looking for earlier bat speed

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  • Hitting off tee -- looking for earlier bat speed

    For your review. In these videos, batter is experimenting with running start, row & go, pre launch torque, etc. so that he stays back and doesn't lunge forward. Another goal is getting max bat speed at or before contact. He is about 105 lbs and he is swinging a 5150 (31/28).

    Let me know your opinion(s) on the good and the problems.

    Thanks, steddie.

    --
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzFmC...e_gdata_player

    --
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yW6Bt...e_gdata_player

  • #2
    Would it help if I post some slow motion video?

    Additional information: the batter is naturally athletic with an aggressive mindset toward going to get the ball. It is unnatural for him to consider keeping his hands near the shoulder as he starts to swing. (I've seen it written that the mlb/elite swing is not a natural thing). He likes to shift forward as he swings - and develops max bat speed well out in front.

    So, in the tee drills shown in the videos, my take is this: torquing the bat rearward (more toward third), gives his hands something to do--and helps counter the natural urge to take them to the ball prematurely. I see that at heel drop his hands have been activated, but they have not really moved forward very much and are close to proper launch position. His elbow "becomes" tucked to his side fairly quickly, and at POC he shows the elbow bent at 90 degrees. He generates early bat speed, as evidenced by the bat blur, and as a result, achieves fairly good extension.

    Needing to launch "as he strides" rather than after, has always been a tough issue, but this early hand activation seems to help him stay back. Your constructive criticisms and thoughts are appreciated

    Comment


    • #3
      Video Framing would help, but like the rest

      Useless baseball comment, but far to much of your video resolution (50%+ of the frame) was on useless space, way above and below batter was wasted, if you frame it much closer, where the frame is consumed by the action you care about, would be much more informative.

      Love the movement he's trying, need better video to comment, which is a compliment, as with current information, not much definitive to pick on from my perspective (can't tell if hips torque first, then go, or if they are going together, etc.), as long as he can sequence this against a live arm, and can "check" or "bleed" this movement out if he's reacting to change in speed.

      Every time I get my son fiddling with this, just one practice with the no movement, early foot down, stay on back side, one swing for all robot coaches dumb it down and he loses his chance to drive the ball on perfect contact.
      Means only big kids drive the ball (with slow swings), and sets everyone up for failure later.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by trschnell View Post
        Useless baseball comment, but far to much of your video resolution (50%+ of the frame) was on useless space, way above and below batter was wasted, if you frame it much closer, where the frame is consumed by the action you care about, would be much more informative.

        Love the movement he's trying, need better video to comment, which is a compliment, as with current information, not much definitive to pick on from my perspective (can't tell if hips torque first, then go, or if they are going together, etc.), as long as he can sequence this against a live arm, and can "check" or "bleed" this movement out if he's reacting to change in speed.

        Every time I get my son fiddling with this, just one practice with the no movement, early foot down, stay on back side, one swing for all robot coaches dumb it down and he loses his chance to drive the ball on perfect contact.
        Means only big kids drive the ball (with slow swings), and sets everyone up for failure later.
        Thanks for the comment trschnell.

        Good point about the space around the batter being pretty much wasted -- would have been better to be closer... for better resolution. (I have a tendency to get too close sometimes-- and wanted to make sure I got the complete swing).

        But as soon as I can I will get another video with better detail.

        Comment


        • #5
          Turn your iPhone/iPod sideways when you shoot video.
          WAR EAGLE!

          Comment


          • #6
            SwingSequencez3b-opti.gif

            gif-test
            Sorry about the poor quality / I need to invest in a good slow motion camera -- any cost conscious suggestions?

            This is probably pretty easy for some of the physics guys (not so easy for me so bear with me). I'm trying to understand the forces (A) Hand & Arm down and rearward torque and (B) Hips/torso horizontal rotation -- and how they begin as separate, non-competing movements, yet blend together to create the swing plane.(Sort of like steps on a spiral staircase)

            Question: Compare two swings -- both result in angled and fairly identical flat swing planes. One is created from two distinct force directions ((A) & (B)) vs. another where batter lines up any and all force in the same direction. Which swing uses energy most efficiently?

            The swing in the gif is a bit exaggerated, but I have noticed this basic movement in what most would call high level mechanics -- although, it is sometimes difficult to see because it is sometimes very subtle. That the two forces also occur almost at the same time adds to the difficulty in seeing it.
            Last edited by steddie; 05-01-2012, 11:57 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think most people will agree that there is a benefit (at least for some batters with certain timing issues) to using a bit of pre-launch torque. I found a video which shows why it could have even more benefits.

              The link below is to a video of a scientific demonstration which shows how the law of conservation of maximum momentum is obeyed through the use of an orbiting gyroscope. You may be thinking -- what does it mean in the baseball swing? Take a look at the video.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1AHz...e_gdata_player

              The bar and motor represents the hips/torso 's horizontal rotation and the spinning wheel of the gyro represents the torqued, pre-swing bat movement. The initial torque of the bat rearward establishes angular momentum which will continue until another force acts upon it. The rotation of the torso interacts with the hand torque in such a way that causes a state of unbalance. The rotating bat, in its attempt to regain balance and conserve momentum, is forced to make certain desirable movements.

              In the video, the gyro flips 180 degrees when rotation direction changes. In the baseball swing, torso rotation causes the bat to do a similar thing. But instead of flipping, the bat seeks an inverted path that is close to the body. This forces the rear elbow in -- close to the body. As the force of the torso rotation continues, it reaches a critical point where it overcomes the initial torque of the bat. When that happens, there is a surge of released energy, which accelerates the bat through point of contact.

              Comment

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