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  • Starting young these days...

    Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

    Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

    What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

    What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

    Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
    Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

    Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

    What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

    What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

    Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.
    The one thingwe never permitted was the players engaging with the umps to question a call.... That was my job!

    Here are the rules by which we run our American Legion Program. Each parent and player signs. The violate tis they are asked to leave, players are asked to sit.

    All players and representatives of XXXXX American Legion are expected to adhere to the following team rules:

    The following items are prohibited:
    1. The purchase and use of alcohol and tobacco.
    2. The use of prescription drugs without the consent of a licensed physician.
    3. The use of foul language.
    4. Throwing or abusing equipment. (All equipment damaged by a player as a result of player abuse will be replaced by the player).
    5. Visible earrings or jewelry.
    6. Inappropriate haircuts.
    7. Uniforms worn inappropriately. (Uniforms will be worn as they are intended with hats facing front).
    8. Outside food during game time.
    9. Spectators to include parents in the dugout, dugout area, or playing field area during practices and games.
    10. Leaving the dugout or dugout area during a game without the coach’s permission.
    11. Fighting between players and fans.
    12. Harassing or heckling other players, coaches or officials.
    13. Arguing with an umpire.

    Also:
    1. Players are required to run to and from their positions
    2. The team will meet at a designated area for away games. Only drivers authorized by the head coach are allowed to transport players.
    3. All players are responsible for the team equipment. No player is allowed to leave until the equipment is secured, the field is raked and the dugouts cleaned.
    4. Players are expected to attend every practice and game. Any player not able to attend is required to notify the coach.
    5. Parents are not permitted to harass, heckle, or use derogatory, profane, or vulgar remarks to the coaches, umpires and players.
    6. All players must submit a raised seal birth certificate before the season begins.
    7. Players are expected to act like gentlemen and represent the program appropriately.
    8. Players are expected to rake the infield and clean the dugout after each practice and game.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
      Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

      Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

      What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

      What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

      Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.
      Quite certain my son's coach (also 13u) would bench him if he tried this and for some reason didn't get thrown out.

      I honestly don't know why people get so worked up about umps. At this age, you have to expect most of them to make some mistakes, but as long as they're not outright favoring one team or blowing rules calls, deal with it, especially since the players need to learn that adjusting to the umps is a skill like any other. I find it even more amusing when the umps are mostly getting the calls right and the families/kids/coaches are complaining. Interesting that the umps usually seem to be doing a good job when you're winning, huh?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
        Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

        Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

        What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

        What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

        Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.
        in our country that happens to. Discipline in no real value anymore. It's good to support your child if treated unfairly but nowadays a lot of parents threaten to sue teachers if they give their child a bad grade. But if their child missbahaves they do nothing.

        I believe this teaches the kids a it's everyone's fault but mine attitude.
        I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
          Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

          Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

          What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

          What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

          Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.
          Maybe he saw Bryce Harper do it....


          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXccEtfmerE

          Comment


          • #6
            Somewhat different but same theme (starting young). We are playing 10U fall baseball in the last game of the year for first place. A kid from the other team strikes out looking. He drops his bat, takes off his helmet, takes off his batting gloves, puts this in his helmet, and leaves everything on home plate for someone to pick up while he walks out to the mound to pitch. We know this team and know his dad is the 3rd base coach. His dad walks by and picks up all his equipment brings it to the dugout, then grabs his hat and glove and runs it out to him. I was astonished.... no hussle back in and out. Clearly too much Sports Center.

            Our coaches said if a player on our team tried that they would be picking up all the equipment after games by themselves for 2 weeks.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mkoehn View Post
              Somewhat different but same theme (starting young). We are playing 10U fall baseball in the last game of the year for first place. A kid from the other team strikes out looking. He drops his bat, takes off his helmet, takes off his batting gloves, puts this in his helmet, and leaves everything on home plate for someone to pick up while he walks out to the mound to pitch. We know this team and know his dad is the 3rd base coach. His dad walks by and picks up all his equipment brings it to the dugout, then grabs his hat and glove and runs it out to him. I was astonished.... no hussle back in and out. Clearly too much Sports Center.

              Our coaches said if a player on our team tried that they would be picking up all the equipment after games by themselves for 2 weeks.
              That is so strange, it makes me think it is something the team cooked up to speed up the transition between innings rather than the batter/pitcher thinking he is specially privileged... (still seems nuts, though...)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cps View Post
                Maybe he saw Bryce Harper do it....


                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXccEtfmerE
                I was at the game in Grand Junction where Harper did that. It apparently didn't affect his stock any. I've never been able to get behind him as a fan after that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Roothog66 View Post
                  I was at the game in Grand Junction where Harper did that. It apparently didn't affect his stock any. I've never been able to get behind him as a fan after that.
                  My quote to the father sitting next to me at the time, "Guess he's a Bryce Harper fan".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cps View Post
                    Maybe he saw Bryce Harper do it....


                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXccEtfmerE
                    You're probably right, kids have way too many distractions these days.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
                      Amazed at the following from my son's 13U game last night...

                      Kid gets rung up on a ball just on the outside corner for out number 3 with the bases loaded. Looks back at the umpire and says "What?". Leans over and draws a line in the dirt outside the plate with his bat, looks back and yells, "It was right there!". The plate ump of course tosses him.

                      What do the parents start yelling? "Why are you tossing him because YOU made a bad call?"

                      What does the coach say? "Blue don't you have to warn him first?"

                      Sure glad they aren't teaching the kid to be responsible for his own actions.
                      This is what happens when you get parents who hate their lives and their jobs and have to channel all happiness through their childs successes.
                      Sports become the #1 thing in their life to sooth the fact that they have nothing going for them. So they hate seeing "Johnny" getting tossed because if he's not playing, then they're not living.

                      I see this all the time in the local rinks. Parents hanging on the glass trying to get at refs, opposing coaches or players.
                      How dare they call a penalty against their son?
                      Instead of teaching kids that life isn't always perfect and you have to roll with an imperfect world, they cry and moan and then pass that message on to their kids.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's so hard to get good umpires in little league/fast pitch and who can blame them? The abuse they take is absolutely unacceptable. On my teams it's really easy. If you want to earn a place on the bench, the fastest way to do it is to yell or complain to an umpire. I won't tolerate it from the players, the fans, or the coaching staff. Only the head coach should approach the umpire, and I really feel this should be on rare occasions. OK, they make mistakes sometimes. So do most of the players on the field, as well as the coaching staff. It's part of life so get used to it. Again, for me it comes down wanting to keep the good umpires around for years to come. We've had some of our very best give it up, saying it just isn't worth the abuse. The kids suffer because of it. Everyone knows how valuable a good umpire is to the overall quality of the game, so think about that before you yell and help drive those guys out.

                        -JJA
                        Last edited by JJA; 04-20-2012, 09:15 AM.
                        The outcome of our children is infinitely more important than the outcome of any game they will ever play

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                        • #13
                          While this happens at all levels, I don"t see it being any different than years past. These kids are learning what is acceptable. He was punished and removed from the game. A percentage of parents and fans will always and have always called out the blue on bad calls. Sports teach a lot more than just how to catch a ball. I would call this a learning experience.

                          As far as the comment about leaving equipment on home plate after a third out, pretty standard practice to help transition from offense to defense quickly. It also builds the bonds between teammates looking out for each other.

                          When my son can't control his emotions created by a play that didn't go his way we talk about what is expected and acceptable after the game.

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                          • #14
                            It's hard to blame the kids for behaving the way they do when the parents and coaches back them up.

                            I normally make it a rule to stay away from the dugout as a parent during games unless my son calls me over if he needs another water bottle or something. But when my son as a 13U player rolled his eyes (as only teenagers can) at the coach when the coach was instructing him about something he should have done in the field. (I don't remember the details). I came over to the dugout and privately told my son if I see him do that again he's going home. I can't imagine what I'd do if he drew a line in the dirt or dropped his helmet on home plate for someone else to pick it up.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by azmatsfan View Post
                              It's hard to blame the kids for behaving the way they do when the parents and coaches back them up.

                              I normally make it a rule to stay away from the dugout as a parent during games unless my son calls me over if he needs another water bottle or something. But when my son as a 13U player rolled his eyes (as only teenagers can) at the coach when the coach was instructing him about something he should have done in the field. (I don't remember the details). I came over to the dugout and privately told my son if I see him do that again he's going home. I can't imagine what I'd do if he drew a line in the dirt or dropped his helmet on home plate for someone else to pick it up.
                              He didn't throw his helment down, he set it on home plate. Very common and builds bonds with players. Base coaches should bring in gear from base runners while team members bring out glove and hats. It's called working together.

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