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  • utseay
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    Our T-Ball league did not keep score or outs. After learning this following our first game in t-ball (my son was 4), my son was carrying a little flip notebook on our way to the next game. I asked what it was for, and he said "If they're not going to keep score, I will". My wife thought it was cute, and it was. But, I wasn't going to let him keep score on the pad. Regardless, he kept yelling out the score every time someone crossed the plate "Five to Three!" (picture Calvin from Calvin and Hobbes and you get the picture). I had him sit after 2 warnings, and he still told me after the game,, "Dad we won 17-14." T-Ballers are cute. But just like marriage, the "cute stuff" turns into "annoying" very quickly (why didn't anyone warn me?). Always take the opportunity to praise the effort, but provide instruction.
    I over looked this part of your comment the first time. lol, I can totally see a kid doing this. Thanks for sharing, it had me cracking up at my desk.

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  • utseay
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    .....what I call 3-on-3 baseball.
    Nicely put. haha

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  • johnlanza
    replied
    Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
    It's a better play to have the first baseman run home, rather than throw home if the kid at the plate can't actually catch. Of course that doesn't mean that is what you should be teaching players to do.
    Our t-ball and coach-pitch leagues (5/6 and 7/8) have rules in place to keep the one or two athletic kids from making all the plays. In the video mentioned above, even though the runner was tagged out by the 1B, the runner would have been called safe at home because the players need to "make a baseball play". In this case the 1B should have thrown the ball (a one hopper is okay) to the catcher. There are a few more of these situational rules which I believe have helped most of the players learn how to actually play the game. (If a pitcher fields a groundball from within the circle, he has to make a throw to 1B, he can't tag out the runner). It's not a perfect system, but it generally works well.

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  • CircleChange11
    replied
    I agree completely about the limitations of a one hour t-ball practice. I also agree that even the best planned t-ball practice will have some situations that are not addressed. We run into the same problem with 10U travel ball with limited to 2 practices per week, and having to cover everything from pickoffs, leadoffs, 1st/3rds, bunt defense, and basic stuff like grounders, flies, batting, pitching, etc. Even with the most efficiently run stations there's not enough time 1.5 hours twice a week. I completely understand.

    And kids will react in confusion.

    I coached t-ball for 3 years and will be coaching again now that my 4yo is signed up. I look forward to it. We always focused on "stay in your spot" and "play your position". We weren't wanting the "crashing" or "4 guys trying to field the same ground ball" that seemed to be prevalent throughout the league. When kids did crash someone else on a play that was clearly not "their position" they sat out an inning (after a warning). Not in a mean coach or a military style fashion, but in a "they need to learn this, and might as well learn now" style. By the end, when we were playing "real outs", I was surprised at how many 1-2-3 innings our defense had, without playing what I call 3-on-3 baseball. Our parents loved it.

    I don't know who's who in all of this, and I try not to identify names, so that I can concentrate on what is being said not who is saying it. But, from the video I saw both coaches congratulate the player, one patted him on the back and one gave him an enthusiastic five for making the "Kelly Leak" (Bad News Bears) play right in front of the second baseman that was in perfect position. Furthermore, he seemed to run at the runner at 3rd (unless I am confusing the situation). It's possible that the player was spoken with later on off camera. But, it would seem possible to me that young player is being sent mixed messages.

    I went through all this with my own son, who has been far advanced every year, both out of nature and out of interest. But, the situations we run into are values that I'm trying to teach him such as being humble, being quietly confident, and then everywhere we go people tell him how awesome he is, and when he gets a non-dad coach all he plays is P-SS-1B, when I make all kids rotate 2 innings IF and OF. One year I did not coach and I asked the coach to put him in the OF and he asked me "Why? What did he do wrong?". We send kids completely mixed messages in regards to the value of teammates, individuals, etc ... and then complain about it when they are grown athletes (or even 10yo athletes) and are essentially arrogant and selfish. Now, that's a lot of preachy talk for a situation that might not actually reflect reality.

    Our T-Ball league did not keep score or outs. After learning this following our first game in t-ball (my son was 4), my son was carrying a little flip notebook on our way to the next game. I asked what it was for, and he said "If they're not going to keep score, I will". My wife thought it was cute, and it was. But, I wasn't going to let him keep score on the pad. Regardless, he kept yelling out the score every time someone crossed the plate "Five to Three!" (picture Calvin from Calvin and Hobbes and you get the picture). I had him sit after 2 warnings, and he still told me after the game,, "Dad we won 17-14." T-Ballers are cute. But just like marriage, the "cute stuff" turns into "annoying" very quickly (why didn't anyone warn me?). Always take the opportunity to praise the effort, but provide instruction.

    Granted the kid is just in T-Ball, and I'm certainly not yelling from the bleachers, or getting out my "The End is Near" sign. Just discussing situations that we all encounter with our boys/plaers. Imagine we're all standing around a grill, sipping a beverage, and shooting the breeze. That's the tone of my comments.
    Last edited by CircleChange11; 04-24-2012, 09:23 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ralanprod
    replied
    My youngest is finishing up his second (and last) t-ball season. (Thank God)

    This type of play highlights one of the basic problems that I see... Coaching to win vs. coaching the way the game is supposed to be played. It's a better play to have the first baseman run home, rather than throw home if the kid at the plate can't actually catch. Of course that doesn't mean that is what you should be teaching players to do. Unless you are really concerned about getting that piece of plastic at the end of the season...

    If the coaches could manage to actually put their ego's aside and not worry about wins and losses, the kids would be much better off. Teach them the right way, ignore the scoreboard, have fun. Why is that so hard?

    Leave a comment:


  • utseay
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    What's the background/reasoning for the "plays at the plate" like that? Is it part of an out, or a tradition where the fielder and batter race to the plate at the end of inning? Or something else?
    Two main reasons:
    1) The problem is lack of experience at this age and the time coaches have vs time it takes to coach basic fundamentals. In a one hour practice you're teaching how to throw, how to catch, stance, grip...all the basic fundamentals to just be on the field basically. As easy as it seems, just practicing the throw to first can take up your whole hour. Plays at the plate are rarely if never practiced, and is one of those plays that you have to rely on in game instruction.

    2) Confusion. The batters fans are screaming "RUN HOME! RUN HOME!", the fielders fans are screaming "HOME HOME HOME!!", one coach is screaming "TO THE CIRCLE", another is screaming "THROW IT HOME"......so the kid does whatever he thinks is right. In most cases they see a runner going home and turn it into a foot race. I've had kids in the outfield, that prior to the play told them "If you get it, you're throwing to third base". They field the ball right in front of me, and I say throw it to third again. And they start running to third. I say throw it about 10 more times, and by the 11th time they are standing on third.....or make a throw from 3ft from third after 20 yards of running.

    Basically, t-ball is caos. You try to control much of the caos as possible, but things like "Plays at the Plate" are never practiced. After the fact of course, you explain what should have been done.

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  • CircleChange11
    replied
    That seems like a play that could be eliminated from the game/league and still have all of the fun of t-ball.

    It's not nearly as bad as youth soccer, where the coach just yells the name of one player the whole game to "get the ball" "get the ball" "get the ball".

    What's the background/reasoning for the "plays at the plate" like that? Is it part of an out, or a tradition where the fielder and batter race to the plate at the end of inning? Or something else?

    Leave a comment:


  • jbolt_2000
    replied
    Originally posted by utseay View Post
    lol, funny that you mention this, because last year the 1B in the video was the "runner on 3rd" (actually second), and the 1B running from 1st was bigger:

    http://youtu.be/Dj1nOspC4yA

    Check out the pitcher, classic t-ball.
    I love the pitcher with the face guard in the middle. looking for the ball to be thrown to him while bouncing around, so excited.

    I have a few kids like that every year and its so fun to watch how excited they are to try and be part of a play that they just look like a chicken with their head cut off. Eventually they learn to relax, but its always fun to watch!

    Leave a comment:


  • utseay
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    Like I said, let Mr. Playmaker be the runner from 3rd, and The Real Mr. Playmaker be the 1B running in from 1st (and outweigh him by 30 pounds), and see how Mr. Playmaker's mom and dad feel about it.
    lol, funny that you mention this, because last year the 1B in the video was the "runner on 3rd" (actually second), and the 1B running from 1st was bigger:

    http://youtu.be/Dj1nOspC4yA

    Check out the pitcher, classic t-ball.
    Last edited by utseay; 04-23-2012, 08:00 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mellowthunder
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    We had a kid do a "jump slide" into home plate yesterday on a close play. He is now known as "Monkey" (from Kung Fu Panda).

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]107695[/ATTACH]

    One more thing to love about baseball, every crazy thing you do leads to a new nickname.

    I'm sure that hurt his tush when he landed. I bet he won't be doing that anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • CircleChange11
    replied
    Originally posted by mellowthunder View Post
    I loved that! Kids being kids. My son used to slide into home plate everytime even when the play wasn't at the plate. Sadly it only last a couple of years.
    We had a kid do a "jump slide" into home plate yesterday on a close play. He is now known as "Monkey" (from Kung Fu Panda).

    10434_1213426079877_500_239.jpg

    One more thing to love about baseball, every crazy thing you do leads to a new nickname.

    Leave a comment:


  • mellowthunder
    replied
    Originally posted by johnlanza View Post
    I love watching this age group (don't know if I enjoyed it as much when I was still coaching that age group).
    My favorite part of this video is the player on the blue team who crosses home plate about :13 into the video.
    I loved that! Kids being kids. My son used to slide into home plate everytime even when the play wasn't at the plate. Sadly it only last a couple of years.

    Leave a comment:


  • utseay
    replied
    Originally posted by johnlanza View Post
    My favorite part of this video is the player on the blue team who crosses home plate about :13 into the video.
    He's just getting his reps in. No need to miss an opportunity at touching the plate. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • johnlanza
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    Here's another video that appears to be the same team that shows the 1B running over and catching a ball that the 2nd baseman was camped under.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CA-Es...feature=relmfu
    I love watching this age group (don't know if I enjoyed it as much when I was still coaching that age group).
    My favorite part of this video is the player on the blue team who crosses home plate about :13 into the video.

    Leave a comment:


  • CircleChange11
    replied
    Originally posted by mellowthunder View Post
    Fun to watch!
    Here's what's been my experience. The defender in the video and other videos is higher performing than the other kids and seems to make a lot of plays "on his own" even though teammates are in the proper positions. Everything is great.

    Let another kid, "tag the crap" out of him, run over him at the plate, jump in front of him when he's camped under a pop up, and all hell breaks lose.

    The bottom line is there shouldn't be situations in t-ball where a collision at the plate is unavoidable, and a 1B running in from 1st trying to tag a runner running in front 3rd is one of them. Like I said, let Mr. Playmaker be the runner from 3rd, and The Real Mr. Playmaker be the 1B running in from 1st (and outweigh him by 30 pounds), and see how Mr. Playmaker's mom and dad feel about it.

    Everything about t-ball is fun ... until certain players or parents forget that it is, actually, t-ball.

    Leave a comment:

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