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13U playing on heels. suggestions requested.

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  • tradosaurus
    replied
    Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
    Are you really this obtuse when it comes to coaching? This happens to be a player on my team who I would like to help, if possible. That isn't worry. That's customer service. Parents paid a fee to get their kids some coaching. If the kid doesn't get it, he doesn't get it, but a coach should give 100% in effort to improve their players. I'm using BBF as a resource to provide 100% effort. Got it?
    If you have the free time to give individual attention then I think that is commendable.

    Personally I give 100% when coaching at practice and games. But with only me and one other coach and 2 hours in a practice it wouldn't be fair for me to give 1 kid individual attention and let the others suffer.

    My son's tournament coach said something that has stuck with me "The only thing that is stopping "players name", is "players name".

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    If he is failing in math and doesn't want to learn or put the effort in getting better then yes, don't worry about it.
    Several thoughts...
    First, I always felt the biggest part of the job is teaching... What are we teaching a child if we simply move on and not "worry about it?" Nothing in the OP suggests the player did not want to try... and even if he didn't - isn't it up to us as adults and coaches to help the player learn??? My greatest successes on the field are those players who others wrote off because of their apparent lack of interest... Many before failed to understand the child or his miserable background... Many went on to have productive lives, good families, with several making a great impact on life... None of this would have happened if the good adults in their lives simply didn't "worry about it."

    I've also coached those who care less... but even n that there are lessons to be taught

    Life is too short to worry about things you can't control.
    Philosophically I agree, but as a coach there is always something in your control.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Uncoach
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    If he is failing in math and doesn't want to learn or put the effort in getting better then yes, don't worry about it.

    Life is too short to worry about things you can't control.
    Are you really this obtuse when it comes to coaching? This happens to be a player on my team who I would like to help, if possible. That isn't worry. That's customer service. Parents paid a fee to get their kids some coaching. If the kid doesn't get it, he doesn't get it, but a coach should give 100% in effort to improve their players. I'm using BBF as a resource to provide 100% effort. Got it?

    Leave a comment:


  • tradosaurus
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    So if a child is failing in math, but doesn't interupt the class... then don't worry about it?
    This is a 13 y/o - why would you not allow the player to become all he can be??? If a player quits because he runs out of talent is one thing, running out of skill... or better yet... allowing a player to run out of skill is another IMHO.
    If he is failing in math and doesn't want to learn or put the effort in getting better then yes, don't worry about it.

    Life is too short to worry about things you can't control.

    Leave a comment:


  • tradosaurus
    replied
    Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
    Why would a coach not give their best effort to prepare someone for the next level? Why as the coach wouldn't you try to make sure every kid on your team looks slick to the HS coaches they will be trying out for? Your getting close to being on my ignore list.
    Crud. I thought I would be there already. :clown:

    If a kid won't learn I'm not going to beat it in him as a coach.

    If the kid is hurting his team by not using proper technique then I would bench him and hopefully that will motivate him to want to learn.

    If it doesn't then he needs to find another sport.

    So, am I on your official ignore list yet? roof:

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    If he won't learn the proper technique and he is not hurting your team then don't worry about it. :cap:
    So if a child is failing in math, but doesn't interupt the class... then don't worry about it?
    This is a 13 y/o - why would you not allow the player to become all he can be??? If a player quits because he runs out of talent is one thing, running out of skill... or better yet... allowing a player to run out of skill is another IMHO.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Uncoach
    replied
    Originally posted by tradosaurus View Post
    If he won't learn the proper technique and he is not hurting your team then don't worry about it. :cap:
    Why would a coach not give their best effort to prepare someone for the next level? Why as the coach wouldn't you try to make sure every kid on your team looks slick to the HS coaches they will be trying out for? Your getting close to being on my ignore list.

    Leave a comment:


  • tradosaurus
    replied
    If he won't learn the proper technique and he is not hurting your team then don't worry about it. :cap:

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
    Gentlemen, I have a 13U player on my team who runs sprints in track, so I know he has the ability to use some part of his foot besides the heels. However, when he fields a ground ball or when he slows down in the outfield to grab a fly ball, he either gets onto his heels (in the case of trying to catch the fly) or runs to the grounder on his heels. It isn't my area of "expertise" to train this bad habit out of a kid. Now let me say he is a very athletic kid with nice hand/eye coordination, good motor and very impressive speed. Staying on his heels is going to be a deal killer for him at another level. Any drills or ideas on how I can help this player?
    At this age some young players are just "bad body" players.... They are changing, or have yet to change and things just don't work very well.

    One of the things we did, that sometimes helps, was get the players in a GB recieving position exagerating getting on the balls/toes of the feet. We would have and have then move in different directions side-to-side by shuffling, back by only stepping on their balls of their feet and toes. Start with one stepp and progress to three... after three it get a little too much. Then progress to using a ball, rolling it to the sides and dropping in front.... it might help....

    Leave a comment:


  • Kings over Queens
    replied
    Off the top of my head I don't know any drills to correct it.

    Have you considered beating him? With his parents permission of course.

    I keed....I keed.

    Actually, perhaps a slow rolling drill where he has to beat the ball as its rolled to a point. Example, mark a line 1/2 way between home and 3rd base. He's got to charge a slow roller and field the ball BEFORE it crosses the line. Obvioulsy you control where the line is set and how fast to roll the ball.

    This might keep him on the charge and off his heels.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Uncoach
    replied
    Originally posted by songtitle View Post
    Leverage. If his head/shoulders are in front of his ankle, he can't be on his heels.
    That's what I've been telling him. I've explained it to him six ways from Sunday, but I can only beat a dead horse so long. I've done this enough that at this point I feel like I'm telling this kid "just throw strikes."

    Leave a comment:


  • songtitle
    replied
    Leverage. If his head/shoulders are in front of his ankle, he can't be on his heels.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Uncoach
    started a topic 13U playing on heels. suggestions requested.

    13U playing on heels. suggestions requested.

    Gentlemen, I have a 13U player on my team who runs sprints in track, so I know he has the ability to use some part of his foot besides the heels. However, when he fields a ground ball or when he slows down in the outfield to grab a fly ball, he either gets onto his heels (in the case of trying to catch the fly) or runs to the grounder on his heels. It isn't my area of "expertise" to train this bad habit out of a kid. Now let me say he is a very athletic kid with nice hand/eye coordination, good motor and very impressive speed. Staying on his heels is going to be a deal killer for him at another level. Any drills or ideas on how I can help this player?

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