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    I'm just curious as to what drills/workouts you guys do for your pitchers? Maybe some good video's to watch?

  • #2
    Originally posted by SC_Josh View Post
    I'm just curious as to what drills/workouts you guys do for your pitchers? Maybe some good video's to watch?

    Josh, what age??
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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    • #3
      I'm talking about 12u

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      • #4
        SC_joshm,

        “I'm just curious as to what drills/workouts you guys do for your pitchers?”
        All of mine at every level overload resistance train “sport specifically” with the appropriately sized wrist weights for drive and recovery strength then throw appropriate sized heavy balls like a ladies 6 lb. shot put (16 and up) or encased lead balls for younger ones to enhance the forwards acceleration drive and drive through release.
        They then and immediately after throw baseballs (bullpen) as their underload element exersize or a wrong foot forwards long straight long toss session to cover the ballistic fasttwitch muscles response, every day depending on the biological age of each participant.

        “Maybe some good video's to watch?”
        Here is some of how we do it.! This interval training program was designed by the top exercise physiologist, kinesiologist in regards to the overhead throwing and pitching motion.

        He insists that all training involve the principles of actual “sport spesific” training where you train in the same mechanic you use during competition.

        Here is a 13 cyo performing some of the drills he has been doing since he was 10. this one is called wrong foot forwards that creates actual separation of hips to shoulders while driving the ball forwardly from length.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHRgU9u4kmI

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNGfSfUV6hU
        Primum non nocere

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        • #5
          I don;t have pitchers do any drills.

          IMHO, there are many well-intentioned and reasonably sounding drills ... but, in my experience,they do not have direct carryover or transfer of skills because it is difficult to break the pitching motion into "segments".

          What I prefer to do is work out any throwing mechanics while playing catch ... introducing step behinds and leg raise there. I suppose one could say that step behinds and leg raise are drills.

          I DO NOT like the "balance drill" where the pitcher holds his leg raise at its highest point, while someone hands him a baseball to throw, and I'm not the biggest fan of the towel drill. IMHO, doing the towel drill just gets you better at towel drill, but not necessarily getting over the front knee in actual pitching.

          Pitching drills? I call it "catch", and it's a lot more fun. You can teach essentially everything about pitching while playing catch ... furthermore, kids can play catch all day. They lose interest in drills after about 10 minutes.

          I do strongly believe in regular, consistent, planned, scheduled bullpen sessions at varied intensity (once mechanics have been straightened out).

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          • #6
            I think drills have a place, but not just to stand a bunch of kids in line and "drill".
            For a group of kids, start by just developing fundemental throwing aspects as a part of your "normal" throwing prep is what I recommend, work on forms until the kids are loose/prepped as part of their "everytime" throwing scenario (Begin on your throwing side knee to isolate the upper half). For your pitchers, you should individualize to the need of the kid and if a kid has a need, I wouldn't just start drill work unless you have an idea on where the kid is going and what you want to do. Particularly in the age group you are talking about, fundementals are crucial.
            What I recommend, is for you to spend the time if you are interested in developing pitchers, just casting random drills might make you look smart..but success may be tricky...unfortunately most associations spend no time training their trainers, so coaches who care are left to their own devices in many instances and so the whole spectrum of capability..good and bad will be there. I was able to access the learning through associations which had enough vision to bring in some professional help to increase the competence of their coaches..this was in every case it was tried in my experience, very helpful and increased over-all league quality (So if your league doesn't do that maybe a conversation needs to happen). I was able and lucky enough to do several other things in order to learn how train a pitcher but as an individual you can certainly do stuff such as go to a House or Woolforth clinic (House has several dates across the country in which he gives coach seminars...he isn't the only one, research it not all are expensive though you may have to go someplace to attend).
            I like step behinds and toe taps for the younger guys because it introduces good timing and momentum, as well as working in the legs/footwork orientation and hips so like Circlechange I'd keep it semi-regular, within the pre-throwing prep.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
              I don;t have pitchers do any drills.

              IMHO, there are many well-intentioned and reasonably sounding drills ... but, in my experience,they do not have direct carryover or transfer of skills because it is difficult to break the pitching motion into "segments".

              What I prefer to do is work out any throwing mechanics while playing catch ... introducing step behinds and leg raise there. I suppose one could say that step behinds and leg raise are drills.

              I DO NOT like the "balance drill" where the pitcher holds his leg raise at its highest point, while someone hands him a baseball to throw, and I'm not the biggest fan of the towel drill. IMHO, doing the towel drill just gets you better at towel drill, but not necessarily getting over the front knee in actual pitching.

              Pitching drills? I call it "catch", and it's a lot more fun. You can teach essentially everything about pitching while playing catch ... furthermore, kids can play catch all day. They lose interest in drills after about 10 minutes.

              I do strongly believe in regular, consistent, planned, scheduled bullpen sessions at varied intensity (once mechanics have been straightened out).
              Nice post. Agree with all points.
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