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  • New England Catching Camp Update

    Hi all,

    Several have asked me for an update so here goes... Things at New England Catching Camp are going very well. Over the Winter we completely a 12-stop National clinic tour and presented at the World Baseball Coaches Convention. Next month, although it doesn't quite seem possible, we are about to start our 12th annual Summer Camp (July 23-26 and August 6-9). We already have catchers from 20 States signed up. Despite the overwhelming growth of the camp this year, our staff has grown as well. We still expect to maintain a 4 or 5-to-1 instructor ratio at our Summer Camp this year. If anyone is interested in attending or has players who wish to attend, PM me.

    The camp, because of the outstanding leadership and guidance from my father before his passing, has continued to thrive Nationwide and offer quality instruction to the most under-instructed position in the game. I just want to thank everyone for all of your continued support over the last year and let you know it has all been much appreciated.

    Here are some photos of the Camp happenings over the last year. Including our road-trip clinics, the World Baseball Coaches Convention and the 2011 Summer Camp...I guess there was a limit to the number of photos I could attach, so feel free to check out our Facebook page to see more - www.facebook.com/catchingcamp.


    283059_228651850513280_2067076_n.jpg287141_1935310744353_647410_o.jpg294292_234010966644035_132517566793376_738031_7973184_n.jpg332682_2674336934966_1629899607_o.jpg408995_316583365053461_1454217071_n.jpg

    Jay
    [email protected] - I will forever miss you Dad. You are my hero. Heaven's catchers just got a whole heck of a lot better... (RIP Coach Weaver 1955-2011)

  • #2
    NE Catcher's Camp was an important part of our clinics (And an important part of my learning process)... I have said this before, but it's worth repeating - They are simply the best in the business. Dave and Jay were a big part of our clinics (our largest had 300 coaches) and they moved on to become participants and instructors for the World Baseball Convention, but inspite of this, they always had time for questions and concerns from me or my catchers.

    Here's a pic from past clinics.
    Jay Receiving-Cropped-3.jpg
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you can't be at a live clinic, the DVD of one of their clinics is the next best thing.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DerekD View Post
        If you can't be at a live clinic, the DVD of one of their clinics is the next best thing.
        Is this the link to the DVD...?
        I ask, becasue I was wondering if it is still the most recent DVD.

        http://www.catchingcamp.com/store/
        Just a baseball layman trying to make sense of it all...

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the pictures. Just the other day, I passed on the url for the DVD. Catching Coach, Dave Weaver, is greatly missed! I'm glad that the camp was a success.
          Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

          I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by trademark View Post
            Is this the link to the DVD...?
            I ask, becasue I was wondering if it is still the most recent DVD.

            http://www.catchingcamp.com/store/
            That's where I ordered mine. It's been within the last couple years so I'm not sure if there's a newer one.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DerekD View Post
              That's where I ordered mine. It's been within the last couple years so I'm not sure if there's a newer one.
              We bought the video and really enjoyed it. For us much of it was pretty much a reminder or validation of things we were already doing, but there were quite a few things that we found useful as cues or things we hadn't thought to try.

              The only thing that's not my preference fro the video is how to handle outside corner framing. I don;t prefer to "fold down", but rather to catch the ball and then just pull in in an inch or two by shoulder blade movement or by just straightening the arm a little. I just don't think there's that many umps that are going to view the folded down mitt and think that's really how the catcher caught it. To me, it's an obvious "frame job", rather than just framing a strike.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8srQswjerWM&feature=plcp

              But the video is extremely good and we'll use it again over the winter with 4-6 travel ball catchers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
                But the video is extremely good and we'll use it again over the winter with 4-6 travel ball catchers.
                CC - I've had the video for a couple months now and have watched it from end to end two times. I played catcher my entire youth and I can say that this video is awesome! It made me realize how many things I was doing wrong as a kid, lol. My team is moving to kid pitch this next season so I haven’t showed it to any of them yet, but plan on implementing it when we start practice again. I'm curious as to how you present the video (or its ideas) to the kids. Do you have them watch the whole video, just the first section (as suggested in these forums), or not have them watch it at all and just instruct via drills?
                Last edited by Mur5; 07-02-2012, 03:58 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mur5 View Post
                  CC - I've had the video for a couple months now and have watched it from end to end two times. I played catcher my entire youth and I can say that this video is awesome! It made me realize how many things I was doing wrong as a kid, lol. My team is moving to kid pitch this next season so I haven’t showed it to any of them yet, but plan on implementing it when we start practice again. I'm curious as to how you present the video (or its ideas) to the kids. Do you have them watch the whole video, just the first section (as suggested in these forums), or not have them watch it all and just instruct via drills?
                  I would NOT simply have them watch the video start to finish.

                  How much of it do you think they'll recall? Not much.

                  I'd use the video the same way we do regular instruction: Explain, model/demonstrate, hands-on, independent/supervised practice.

                  So, depending on your experience or skill the video would either replace the "explain" part or the "explain and demonstrate" parts.

                  My preference would be to have the watch a video segment, then have a catcher volunteer demonstrate it as you reiterate the main points of whatever you're working on (stance, setup, target height, blocking, throwing footwork, etc), and then have each catcher try it with your supervision, and then eventually have them practicing it on your own.

                  In my experience here's where catching instruction fails, coaches show to them ONCE have them practice it ONCE and then not really ever go back to it. So, once you teach your catcher something that needs to become part of EVERY catching practice. Now, that might just be a quick review on stance/balance, target height. But, for framing, blocking, and throwing those should be done EVERY practice, and I would block off 20 minutes for catchers (most likely as one coach takes IF and hits ground balls with throw to first or working around the cones and dropping it in buckets, and another coach works with OF).

                  But, I definitely would watch a segment, reiterate the main points, demonstrate/model, guided practice, independent practice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ok thats pretty much what I was thinking. Was just curious to see how other coaches would approach it.

                    Thanks for the advice CC!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
                      The only thing that's not my preference fro the video is how to handle outside corner framing. I don;t prefer to "fold down", but rather to catch the ball and then just pull in in an inch or two by shoulder blade movement or by just straightening the arm a little. I just don't think there's that many umps that are going to view the folded down mitt and think that's really how the catcher caught it. To me, it's an obvious "frame job", rather than just framing a strike.

                      CircleChange,

                      Thanks for the input. Very happy you've enjoyed the video. I did want to make sure that you hadn't misinterpreted what the video says about turning the glove over into the "C" glove position. It is never folded down after receiving the pitch. All of our catchers are taught that once the ball hits the glove, nothing moves. Period. The idea of framing a pitch, or fooling an umpire into thinking a ball was actually thrown in the strikezone, doesn't work. The umpire isn't blind, deaf or dumb and the impact of the ball creates a sound that qualifies what the eyes just saw. Any movement thereafter is evidence that the pitch wasn't where the catcher wanted it. We get our glove into the "C" glove position before the ball hits it to ensure that we never end up receiving the pitch in a way that forces it back out of the strikezone. There is no framing.

                      By turning the glove over into the "C" glove position on a pitch to the catcher's throwing-hand side PRIOR to receiving the pitch, it allows the catcher's wrist, elbow and forearm to remain locked in place, preventing the ball from carrying it outside of the strikezone upon impact. I will say that we do now also teach our students get their glove around the ball by rolling it forward (index finger points forward) on pitches above their shoulders or at the batter's knees. After much research, video and otherwise, we found that a different approach with these pitches was needed to present the pitch to the umpire in a way that let's them more accurately interpret the location of the pitch. But with either of the approaches, there shouldn't be any movement whatsoever after the ball hits the glove. I will also say that after talking with umpires at every level in the game, none of them have ever questioned our "C" glove position or interpreted it as a "frame job". That is, as long as the catcher beat the ball to the spot and his glove wasn't moving after the instance of contact with the ball.

                      Hope this clears things up a bit.
                      [email protected] - I will forever miss you Dad. You are my hero. Heaven's catchers just got a whole heck of a lot better... (RIP Coach Weaver 1955-2011)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Derek,

                        The DVD you have is the most recent, but we are on the verge of releasing a ton of video content and other instructional media over the next few months. We are getting very excited about what we are going to be able to put out there. Please keep checking the website and our facebook page for updates.
                        [email protected] - I will forever miss you Dad. You are my hero. Heaven's catchers just got a whole heck of a lot better... (RIP Coach Weaver 1955-2011)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mur5 View Post
                          Do you have them watch the whole video, just the first section (as suggested in these forums), or not have them watch it at all and just instruct via drills?
                          Mur,

                          There is no harm in showing it to them section by section, but the best way to approach the introduction of new mechanics to catchers at the particular age you are working with would be to present the information in segments. Focus completely on the stances the first go-round. It alone will fix some of the issues you will encounter. Then start working into blocking, focusing on the sequence of the skill (hands first, feet and body next, fix the position in a training environment) and so on and so on. If they were 12-year old+, go ahead and watch it once front to back and then go back to each section as it applies to what you are working on that particular day. The youngest catcher's just don't have the attention span to watch a coach clinic without actually throwing the gear on and doing something. So you should be the one to present the information to them section by section, having them go through the drills and the stances themselves, reinforcing the DVD along the way. It certainly is never a bad thing to have them watch it from time to time as they continue to progress. It can serve as a reminder of each concept you go over during practice. We very often underestimate young children's ability to undertand complex processes. It is, in fact, all about how the information is presented to them.

                          Hope this helps, please PM me if you have any specific questions. I'd be more than happy to help.
                          Last edited by CatchingCoachJR; 07-05-2012, 10:01 PM.
                          [email protected] - I will forever miss you Dad. You are my hero. Heaven's catchers just got a whole heck of a lot better... (RIP Coach Weaver 1955-2011)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CatchingCoachJR View Post
                            Mur,

                            There is no harm in showing it to them section by section, but the best way to approach the introduction of new mechanics to catchers at the particular age you are working with would be to present the information in segments. Focus completely on the stances the first go-round. It alone will fix some of the issues you will encounter. Then start working into blocking, focusing on the sequence of the skill (hands first, feet and body next, fix the position in a training environment) and so on and so on. If they were 12-year old+, go ahead and watch it once front to back and then go back to each section as it applies to what you are working on that particular day. The youngest catcher's just don't have the attention span to watch a coach clinic without actually throwing the gear on and doing something. So you should be the one to present the information to them section by section, having them go through the drills and the stances themselves, reinforcing the DVD along the way. It certainly is never a bad thing to have them watch it from time to time as they continue to progress. It can serve as a reminder of each concept you go over during practice. We very often underestimate young children's ability to undertand complex processes. It is, in fact, all about how the information is presented to them.

                            Hope this helps, please PM me if you have any specific questions. I'd be more than happy to help.
                            CCJR - Thanks for the reply/advice! I've very much enjoyed the video and look forward to utilizing it this upcomming season.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by CatchingCoachJR View Post
                              CircleChange,

                              Thanks for the input. Very happy you've enjoyed the video. I did want to make sure that you hadn't misinterpreted what the video says about turning the glove over into the "C" glove position. It is never folded down after receiving the pitch. All of our catchers are taught that once the ball hits the glove, nothing moves. Period. The idea of framing a pitch, or fooling an umpire into thinking a ball was actually thrown in the strikezone, doesn't work. The umpire isn't blind, deaf or dumb and the impact of the ball creates a sound that qualifies what the eyes just saw. Any movement thereafter is evidence that the pitch wasn't where the catcher wanted it. We get our glove into the "C" glove position before the ball hits it to ensure that we never end up receiving the pitch in a way that forces it back out of the strikezone. There is no framing.

                              By turning the glove over into the "C" glove position on a pitch to the catcher's throwing-hand side PRIOR to receiving the pitch, it allows the catcher's wrist, elbow and forearm to remain locked in place, preventing the ball from carrying it outside of the strikezone upon impact. I will say that we do now also teach our students get their glove around the ball by rolling it forward (index finger points forward) on pitches above their shoulders or at the batter's knees. After much research, video and otherwise, we found that a different approach with these pitches was needed to present the pitch to the umpire in a way that let's them more accurately interpret the location of the pitch. But with either of the approaches, there shouldn't be any movement whatsoever after the ball hits the glove. I will also say that after talking with umpires at every level in the game, none of them have ever questioned our "C" glove position or interpreted it as a "frame job". That is, as long as the catcher beat the ball to the spot and his glove wasn't moving after the instance of contact with the ball.

                              Hope this clears things up a bit.
                              That does clear it up, and it does make a difference if they get the glove to spot before the catch, not after.

                              Don't the catcher's find it very difficult to catch an outside corner pitch "upside down" (with their fingers pointing toward the ground)?

                              I ask because ML catchers simply catch the ball on the corner with "the pinchers" (thumb and index finger) and just "bring it in a tad" by straightening the elbow AS they are catching the ball. It's really quite brilliant as there's not a "tell" that the catcher did anything except catch the ball exactly where it's thrown.

                              IMO, catching the ball with the hand "upside down" or in the C, for a youth catcher would lead to a lot of "thumbed" pitches, where the ball skirts off the glove/bumpers.

                              In short, I guess I'm asking "Isn't this making the outside corner pitch harder to catch than it needs to be?"

                              Now, obviously, everyone knows who's who in this discussion. You're CatchingCoachJR and run an incredibly reputed catching camp and I'm pretty much just a dad that coaches 10U baseball ... so I don't want my response to come across as if I'm challenging the establishment or taking a shot. I'm a coach asking a technique question to another coach to better understand why the more experienced coach does the things they do.

                              I posted a link to my son catching earlier in this thread and there were a couple of pitches that were on the outsidish corner. Would these pitches have been ones where you would have wanted him to "catch it with a C" (or fingers pointing to ground)?

                              Comment

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