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Why make players run after games (win or lose)?

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  • Why make players run after games (win or lose)?

    I am a firm believer in running for a purpose. We run to learn how to run bases better or work on conditioning and building leg strength. I feel that if we run our players when they do things wrong that we are teaching them running is a punishment and if we teach this at an early age then those players grow up hating running, which can lead to being lazy unfit adults.


    I also know that not all coaches feel the same and believe running as a punishment is a healthy motivator, and I disagree, but respect that opinion.


    With that being said - What is the point of making your team run after a game? I get it when you lose because your players didn't hustle or made alot of errors, but why run after a win?

    Our team is currently in LL-Juniors Divisions Championships and lost our first game to this team who played fantastically. They did great and definitely earned their win. But immediately after shaking hands, they ran out to right field and ran their five wind sprints. I've seen this before on many occasions over the years, but just thought of it as a team unity type thing. But after the other night I thought, "Why?".

    Anyone do this after games? If so, why? What does it accomplish and how does it build the kids into better players?

  • #2
    Pitchers believe running after outings to breaks up the lactic acid their arms... Maybe that's part of the team's routine...

    If everyone buys in, it could definitely create some team unity...

    It can't hurt...
    I don't like my balls to smell like pickles.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
      I am a firm believer in running for a purpose. We run to learn how to run bases better or work on conditioning and building leg strength. I feel that if we run our players when they do things wrong that we are teaching them running is a punishment and if we teach this at an early age then those players grow up hating running, which can lead to being lazy unfit adults.


      I also know that not all coaches feel the same and believe running as a punishment is a healthy motivator, and I disagree, but respect that opinion.


      With that being said - What is the point of making your team run after a game? I get it when you lose because your players didn't hustle or made alot of errors, but why run after a win?

      Our team is currently in LL-Juniors Divisions Championships and lost our first game to this team who played fantastically. They did great and definitely earned their win. But immediately after shaking hands, they ran out to right field and ran their five wind sprints. I've seen this before on many occasions over the years, but just thought of it as a team unity type thing. But after the other night I thought, "Why?".

      Anyone do this after games? If so, why? What does it accomplish and how does it build the kids into better players?
      I don't like running after games for any reason. To me it serves no real purpose. I use the post game discussions as a teaching moment, win or lose.

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      • #4
        Depends on the age and the purpose that is served by running.

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        • #5
          This particular example is 13-14 year olds. But I've seen it as low as 10u.

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          • #6
            Both my son's teams run (8U and 9U). And they like it. I've seen them lose a game and be down, but they love the running at the end.

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            • #7
              I've now coached 5/6 and 7/8 year-olds. After a game, the only running our team does is to the concession stand for team drinks

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              • #8
                Originally posted by AdamInNY View Post
                Both my son's teams run (8U and 9U). And they like it. I've seen them lose a game and be down, but they love the running at the end.
                I used it at 9U for the kids who messed up in the game. FI, taking a called strike 3 or other mental mistake that lacked aggressiveness. We would keep track of them in the scorebook, I would go over them with the other coaches so they agreed, and then we would pick a spot for those select kids to run to and then run back (for punishment). Now before anyone says I'm evil, I ran with them. The parents thought it was great, as the boys had fun with me running alongside and trying to race them, but at the same time they were made aware that taking strike 3, etc. wasn't an option. Sometimes I think they struck out looking on purpose! :lol:

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
                  This particular example is 13-14 year olds. But I've seen it as low as 10u.
                  Specifically speaking after a win, I can't answer, but I have seen it and would be curious as to the reasoning as well.

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                  • #10
                    Kids just love running. I dont think of it as punishment or conditioning or anything. They just love to run around. Let them take off their cleats and have at it

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                    • #11
                      I think it's from the "get the blood flowing" school of recovery... for pitchers, at least.

                      Probably, it's a good way to relax from the tension of the game, too.

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                      • #12
                        Running is good exercise. It's that simple. I agree that it should not be used as punishment. Here are some factors to consider:

                        1) Time. If the game itself has been long or a long commute is involved then running may be limited or eliminated.

                        2) Post game instruction. Run, but work on one particular aspect, usually, but not always, base running.

                        3) The conditioning plan. A coach needs to figure out when the team has had rest, when the team last ran, and when the team will run next. Some coaches, for example, have their kids run a lot the practice on the day before a game. That is a mistake.

                        4) Pitchers. Pitching is it's own special case. Ideally, pitchers would run the day after the game but adjustments need to be made if that is not possible.

                        5) The game itself does not involve a lot of running. For example, a third baseman may not get any balls hit to him or he may not get on base in a given game. But baseball is a sport which requires conditioning so a coach has to plan accordingly. For example, a practice may be structured in such a way that conditioning is weaved into practice through taking grounders, doing drills,etc. Other times, practice may consist of something lighter, like standing around waiting for a turn to hit in a cage. A coach has to figure out a pattern of rest and conditioning based on what a team is doing in a given week, month, or season. Often, coaches just willy-nilly it which is a mistake.
                        Major Figure

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                        • #13
                          1. It shows the parents/fans that the coach isn't happy about the way the team played, resulting in losing. The players don;t learn anything from the running. It's all show for the coach. Seriously, did any of you guys as players ever look to each other in the 6th inning and say "Damn, we better take the lead or we're gonna run for certain."? No. Me neither.

                          2. Pitchers run to [1] increase endurance (day of and sequential days) and [2] increased blood flow carries away muscular waste products and delivers "rebuilding materials" faster to aid recovery; some call it active rest.

                          After the game, it's all to let everyone in the park know that the coach doesn;t teach his kids to play that way and lose. So, now they must be punished. I always wanted to, but never did, ask our coach to run with us. Oh yeah, he's the only one that did his job at the expected level.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
                            1. It shows the parents/fans that the coach isn't happy about the way the team played, resulting in losing. The players don;t learn anything from the running. It's all show for the coach. Seriously, did any of you guys as players ever look to each other in the 6th inning and say "Damn, we better take the lead or we're gonna run for certain."? No. Me neither.

                            2. Pitchers run to [1] increase endurance (day of and sequential days) and [2] increased blood flow carries away muscular waste products and delivers "rebuilding materials" faster to aid recovery; some call it active rest.

                            After the game, it's all to let everyone in the park know that the coach doesn;t teach his kids to play that way and lose. So, now they must be punished. I always wanted to, but never did, ask our coach to run with us. Oh yeah, he's the only one that did his job at the expected level.
                            Couldn't agree more

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Standballdad View Post
                              Couldn't agree more
                              Circle nailed it. "It's all show for the coach."
                              Skip

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