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Why make players run after games (win or lose)?

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  • omg
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    We ended practices with base stealing and leads ... so we were able to get in running while learning something.

    Right, this is typically what I do. Just saying this may occur after a game as well. Don't see why that is difficult to understand.

    So what does running after a game 5 days before your next practce tell you??
    It doesn't tell me anything. It just means they will have ample rest so that makes it a good time to condition. Hell, if the previous game was 5 days earlier then you've gone 10 days without conditioning.

    Seldom does a team take a field for anything after a game other than a post-game talk. I certainly would not do it on a visitor's field.
    If it's the visitor's field then the running takes place in the outfield.
    xxxxxxxxxxx

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  • kimbercarry
    replied
    I can say I've used it once in my time as a coach. We lost a close game on a questionable call and I had 2 kids that acted in a disrespectful manner to one of my assistants, the umpire and the other team at the conclusion. There was also some equipment throwing/slamming involved. All of this IMO is unacceptable. Other than that I see no purpose of it win or lose. We beat a team pretty good this year. They had some errors that helped but the bottom line was we hit the ball the best we did all year and just overwhelmed the team. They had actually just beat us the prior week. The other coach chewed them during the whole game and after then made them run bases after the game for poor performance. I don't know of any kid on any team that tries to go out and play bad and lose. I can't see having kids run for poor performance.

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  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by omg View Post
    Not even in college? I understand what you are saying though as that has largely been my experience as well. But think about it, it is very common to run at the end of practice, right?
    We ended practices with base stealing and leads ... so we were able to get in running while learning something.

    Like I said, running after games is not an every time occurrence but there are definitely times when it is appropriate. You run at the end of practice for a reason as you would at the end of a game. What if your team played Friday afternoon and wasn't practicing or playing again until next Wednesday?
    So what does running after a game 5 days before your next practce tell you??
    A coach has to know whether a team can benefit from a workout and when it will be detrimental.
    I am uncertain if I even understand this...

    As far as the post-game running, I probably lean towards the idea that it is one more opportunity to teach, usually an aspect of base running, and it's killing 2 stones with 1 bird to get conditioning out of it.
    Seldom does a team take a field for anything after a game other than a post-game talk. I certainly would not do it on a visitor's field.

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  • omg
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post

    I've ran after games plenty of times (probably more than most, heh heh) as part of a team. I've NEVER heard anyone say anything about running after games to supplement conditioning, except for pitchers.
    Not even in college? I understand what you are saying though as that has largely been my experience as well. But think about it, it is very common to run at the end of practice, right? Like I said, running after games is not an every time occurrence but there are definitely times when it is appropriate. You run at the end of practice for a reason as you would at the end of a game. What if your team played Friday afternoon and wasn't practicing or playing again until next Wednesday? A coach has to know whether a team can benefit from a workout and when it will be detrimental.

    I played for many good coaches who would occasionally use running after a game-or other times- as punishment. They do it out of frustration because they've probably tried everything else. I don't have a problem with it but I don't believe in it for myself.

    The main reason I think running after a game, even a win, is not done more frequently is because the whole "game" thing can be a freaking time consuming ordeal. In one scenario, both teams take bp, both take infield, game might drag on, then there is travel, maintenance, etc. So it can be an ordeal and a coach should be looking to cut that down-one way is to eliminate the conditioning (a better way would be to skip that 45 minute post-game talk).

    Another theory is that the position players don't need that post-game, or even post-practice conditioning, because they are getting plenty of running by taking a zillion grounders, running the bases during bp, etc. I agree with that somewhat, although it depends, you might be coaching a team where you are not able to organize that type of practice regularly.

    As far as the post-game running, I probably lean towards the idea that it is one more opportunity to teach, usually an aspect of base running, and it's killing 2 stones with 1 bird to get conditioning out of it.

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  • CircleChange11
    replied
    Originally posted by omg View Post
    So running after a game is a good thing. Plus, if you see an open field staring you in the face, you want to take advantage of it. With weather factors, field permits, schedule, etc. you might want to jump at the opportunity.
    I've played BB from T-Ball through College, and played in lots of areas with teammates from every part of the country except the Northeast.

    I've ran after games plenty of times (probably more than most, heh heh) as part of a team. I've NEVER heard anyone say anything about running after games to supplement conditioning, except for pitchers.

    Every time, the stated reason has been because we "didn't do X very well, and X is important. So, until we can do X well, we're going to run."

    I got an idea coach, let's spend the time practicing X more? Sorry, I spoke without permission. I'll run.

    HS baseball players are likely active throughout the year with football, basketball, soccer, and wrestling. College baseball players participate in 3 hours practices as well as morning conditioning on a daily basis ... all for ht esport the requires the most standing around.

    I'd like to think that there was a higher purpose for the running in baseball ... but it's not like basketball where you run your balls off and then shoot free throws to get used to shooting important free throws with tired legs. There's only one or two guys that's "tired" at the end of a baseball game.

    I also think it's incredibly STUPID to have your catcher, who just caught a double header in heat, to run sprints because the team made too many errors. Of course, they'll ask that kid to catch tomorrow and the next day and the next day. Then when he allows some passed balls because he's beat, make the team run for it.

    There have been some coaches that I have respected A LOT who made us run for some pretty stupid stuff, including for "not playing well, where we've beaten teams by quite a few runs".

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  • omg
    replied
    Maybe some coaches do it to show off (we're talking about after a win). As I mentioned before, there are certain considerations as to whether a team should run. The big thing probably is that, inherently, the game of baseball doesn't involve, often, a lot of running. Unlike basketball. Still, I bet that in basketball at the high levels, guys who don't get in the game much will have to do post game conditioning just to keep their conditioning at the level of the guys that get the minutes.

    So running after a game is a good thing. Plus, if you see an open field staring you in the face, you want to take advantage of it. With weather factors, field permits, schedule, etc. you might want to jump at the opportunity.

    But I understand the "showing off" thinking. Here I am coaching a team that just got hammered. I've decided to not have my team run and the other team is out there running, looking like a well oiled military platoon. It will get under your skin.

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  • Standballdad
    replied
    Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
    So is the consensus that its just the coach showing off - after a win?
    It makes him feel good about himself, and feeds his Ego.

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  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
    So is the consensus that its just the coach showing off - after a win?
    In my experience - yes.

    I should add - I never had any problems running after the game if the players were doing so for a purpose. More times than not it's the coach standing out there like he was a ticked off D.I. I have always felt that you don't mold or develop athletes by beating them to death (figuratively). You have to motivate them into wanting to do it for the purpose of improving.
    Last edited by Jake Patterson; 07-24-2012, 08:46 PM.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by jbolt_2000 View Post
    I get this - I don't agree with the philosophy - but I get it.
    But my question revolves around the wins. Why make the whole team run after a win, when they all played good?
    I think it's to show everyone how disciplined the players are. And I think that's also the coach showing off.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    Threatening to throw them in a volcano can be VERY age-appropriate!
    I said it one 11-year-old before he walked to the plate this spring, and he thought that was the funniest thing he'd ever heard. The kid almost struck out because he couldn't stop laughing. Every pitch, he looked down at me, and I raised my hands above my head and acted like I was using both arms to toss something. We were younger and less experienced than the other teams, and it showed in your win-loss record. But we sure had the most fun.

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  • jbolt_2000
    replied
    So is the consensus that its just the coach showing off - after a win?

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  • jbolt_2000
    replied
    Originally posted by CircleChange11 View Post
    1. It shows the parents/fans that the coach isn't happy about the way the team played, resulting in losing. The players don;t learn anything from the running. It's all show for the coach. Seriously, did any of you guys as players ever look to each other in the 6th inning and say "Damn, we better take the lead or we're gonna run for certain."? No. Me neither.

    2. Pitchers run to [1] increase endurance (day of and sequential days) and [2] increased blood flow carries away muscular waste products and delivers "rebuilding materials" faster to aid recovery; some call it active rest.

    After the game, it's all to let everyone in the park know that the coach doesn;t teach his kids to play that way and lose. So, now they must be punished. I always wanted to, but never did, ask our coach to run with us. Oh yeah, he's the only one that did his job at the expected level.
    I get this - I don't agree with the philosophy - but I get it.
    But my question revolves around the wins. Why make the whole team run after a win, when they all played good?

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  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I'm not exactly a hard-ass out there. The kids know I'm fairly easy-going. So they take liberties. Although, I have been known to announce that I'm going to throw a kid into a volcano if he doesn't get a hit or if he makes an error.
    Threatening to throw them in a volcano can be VERY age-appropriate!

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    At this age it's not a big deal.... Take them aside and speak with them.

    With older players - I never forced a player to do anything... "If you don't want to do it, don't do it, go sit down!" I'll see you after the game or practice. I never had a problem.
    I'm not exactly a hard-ass out there. The kids know I'm fairly easy-going. So they take liberties. Although, I have been known to announce that I'm going to throw a kid into a volcano if he doesn't get a hit or if he makes an error.

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  • Jake Patterson
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I'm with those who think it's unnecessary BS from the coach to show that he's no softy. What I'd like to know is how to get a kid to do exercises when he refuses. Today, we did a sideways crab walk to work on catcher mobility, and one kid refused to do it. Another kid refused to run a lap at the end of practice. He jogged out to the fence and walked the rest of the way around the field. Dad said he was tired from going to the beach... My boy used to do the same stuff. He wouldn't run for me. But he ran for other coaches, and he now runs for me, too. Perhaps it's just an age thing. A few of our guys are still 8 years old.
    At this age it's not a big deal.... Take them aside and speak with them.

    With older players - I never forced a player to do anything... "If you don't want to do it, don't do it, go sit down!" I'll see you after the game or practice. I never had a problem.

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