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  • "Getting the foot down early"

    I've heard this concept being espoused frequently by some good hitting people, typically at the mlb level. I guess it means to take the stride a little earlier than a hitter might normally in order to time the pitcher, get balanced, and avoid the typical problems with the stride.

    Please let me know your thoughts as to the merit and validity of the concept. In other words, is it a worthwhile teach, does it get results?
    Major Figure

  • #2
    Originally posted by omg View Post
    I've heard this concept being espoused frequently by some good hitting people, typically at the mlb level. I guess it means to take the stride a little earlier than a hitter might normally in order to time the pitcher, get balanced, and avoid the typical problems with the stride.

    Please let me know your thoughts as to the merit and validity of the concept. In other words, is it a worthwhile teach, does it get results?
    No, do not teach it, do not allow it to be taught. Getting the foot down early is a killer, unless you continue to stretch after it's down. Which most people don't. Now if you can do it like Granderson or Howard... then I wouldn't mind seeing it. However, for the majority of hitters, I'd say no.

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    • #3
      I think that term "get your front foot down early" needs more clarification. Do you mean to toe touch or heel drop?

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      • #4
        I interpret it as "get the front foot down in time". If you get the front foot down too late, you'll end up swinging and striding at the same time -- no good.

        I think it's a cue for those who are getting it down too late to get it down earlier. Not a general rule that earlier is better on the stride.

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        • #5
          pstein - Can you educate me as to why you have that opinion? As I understand it, it allows the hitter more time to read the pitch.

          ***Let me re-phrase: More time to react to a pitch***
          Last edited by DThompson; 08-02-2012, 09:25 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
            I think that term "get your front foot down early" needs more clarification. Do you mean to toe touch or heel drop?
            Also, what is the "early" relative to? I have heard it been used in terms of "early" meaning at pitcher release. Most of the MLB hitters that have a stride pattern where the foot comes off the ground do not have their foot down at pitcher release.

            It's a link to another board but I think it shows a nice picture of the pattern and sequence of MLB hitters broken into action leading up to pitcher release and the actions from pitcher release to contact.
            http://baseballdebate.proboards.com/...ay&thread=1593
            @noontimegifs

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
              I think that term "get your front foot down early" needs more clarification. Do you mean to toe touch or heel drop?
              Toe touch.
              Major Figure

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              • #8
                OK. Since you are looking at toe touch, omg.....

                I'm glad Noontime posted up. He does a great job with the gifs.

                As examples, Edmonds as a no-strider is essentially at toe touch right before the pitcher releases the ball.

                Also, I'd take a close look at Kinsler. Notice toe touch and the ball in pitchers hand is about same location as it was in Edmund's gif.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
                  OK. Since you are looking at toe touch, omg.....

                  I'm glad Noontime posted up. He does a great job with the gifs.

                  As examples, Edmonds as a no-strider is essentially at toe touch right before the pitcher releases the ball.

                  Also, I'd take a close look at Kinsler. Notice toe touch and the ball in pitchers hand is about same location as it was in Edmund's gif.
                  Edmonds, Granderson, Wright... while their foot (toe) is on the ground at pitcher release... you can also see that their heel lifts more after release as they coil forward as part of their sequence timing the ball. I need a Pujols clip in that collection!

                  Kinsler is a different cat... he talks some about his approach here and about how his swing looks:
                  http://mlb.mlb.com/video/play.jsp?content_id=22978501
                  @noontimegifs

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NoonTime View Post
                    Also, what is the "early" relative to? I have heard it been used in terms of "early" meaning at pitcher release. Most of the MLB hitters that have a stride pattern where the foot comes off the ground do not have their foot down at pitcher release.

                    It's a link to another board but I think it shows a nice picture of the pattern and sequence of MLB hitters broken into action leading up to pitcher release and the actions from pitcher release to contact.
                    http://baseballdebate.proboards.com/...ay&thread=1593
                    Exaclty......

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NoonTime View Post
                      Edmonds, Granderson, Wright... while their foot (toe) is on the ground at pitcher release... you can also see that their heel lifts more after release as they coil forward as part of their sequence timing the ball. I need a Pujols clip in that collection!

                      Kinsler is a different cat... he talks some about his approach here and about how his swing looks:
                      http://mlb.mlb.com/video/play.jsp?content_id=22978501
                      Yep. Kinsler's just drops. Good observation.

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                      • #12
                        Here is Pujols with both of his "styles"
                        08/31/12 - foot stays on ground


                        08/16/11 - foot comes off ground
                        @noontimegifs

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                        • #13
                          Some good reads and video on the topic supporting the "don't teach it" and "don't do it" side from Tewks:

                          http://showcaseleague.com/2011/03/24...ding-patterns/

                          http://tewksbaseball.com/2011/10/26/...-early-part-1/

                          http://tewksbaseball.com/2011/10/27/...-early-part-2/
                          @noontimegifs

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NoonTime View Post
                            Some good reads and video on the topic supporting the "don't teach it" and "don't do it" side from Tewks:

                            http://showcaseleague.com/2011/03/24...ding-patterns/

                            http://tewksbaseball.com/2011/10/26/...-early-part-1/

                            http://tewksbaseball.com/2011/10/27/...-early-part-2/
                            That's good stuff from Tewks, thanks. I guess it is just a matter of opinion, or a style. I always thought "getting the foot down early" was a rhthym breaker and power diminisher, almost like a no-stride. It's somewhat of a robotic move. Still, if it works for some individuals then it has to be an option. Certainly, a lot of mlb guys keep advocating it every time they evaluate a hitter being successful.
                            Major Figure

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                            • #15
                              omg,

                              In addition, for many coaches it's simply a cue to ensure the player gets his swing started on time. For example, several years ago I remember talking with Lau Jr about this. His claim was that A-Rod had a tendency to start his swing a little late, so the simple advice of "get your front foot down early" was an effective cue for A-Rod to start his swing on time.

                              As with all cues, it certainly can be misused and could become a rhythm breaker, but that's not the intent for most coaches.

                              -JJA
                              The outcome of our children is infinitely more important than the outcome of any game they will ever play

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