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Which foot should be hitting the base when rounding first?

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  • Which foot should be hitting the base when rounding first?

    I always thought it was the left foot so you were on the inside of the base but I heard differently. Which is the proper foot?

  • #2
    A few people won't agree, but I think it's widely accepted that it doesn't matter which foot - the goal is not to break stride as the baserunner rounds the bag.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by hitwithwood View Post
      I always thought it was the left foot so you were on the inside of the base but I heard differently. Which is the proper foot?
      Hit,
      We recently had a lengthy thread discussing this topic.. You may want to do a search. While I always taught tagging with the right foot... I agree with other posters that any foot is better than chop stepping to make certain it's the right.
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hitwithwood View Post
        I always thought it was the left foot so you were on the inside of the base but I heard differently. Which is the proper foot?
        I dont think it really matters as long as you do it in stride, but tagging with the right foot is going to keep you more inside of the base. if you tag with the left foot your right foot is going to be over the base, if you tag with the right foot your body will be inside the base.

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        • #5
          It doesn't matter as long as the runner hits the base without breaking stride. I was taught left foot for the reason the runner can get a harder push off that foot. From trying both ways I agreed and taught left foot. But if someone was more comfortable with right foot I didn't change them.

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          • #6
            Back when I was in LL, my coach was hospitalized with a heart condition and apparently had to leave the game. He was replaced at the last minute by - of all people - my soccer coach.

            Being a leadoff hitter and shortstop, coach's best input to the game came to footwork. We actually did rotations around the bags to get best base-to-base speeds and his credo was to go in stride. Once broken, it takes too long to get the momentum back up and can be the difference between extending a single to a double and being a dead duck at the second base bag. He also got those that didn't have soccer experience to play more on the balls of our feet as oppose to being flat-footed.

            Honestly, he had no insight to improve hitting, but he did make the team more nimble and fleet-footed compared to prior seasons.
            "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ben Grimm View Post
              Back when I was in LL, my coach was hospitalized with a heart condition and apparently had to leave the game. He was replaced at the last minute by - of all people - my soccer coach.

              Being a leadoff hitter and shortstop, coach's best input to the game came to footwork. We actually did rotations around the bags to get best base-to-base speeds and his credo was to go in stride. Once broken, it takes too long to get the momentum back up and can be the difference between extending a single to a double and being a dead duck at the second base bag. He also got those that didn't have soccer experience to play more on the balls of our feet as oppose to being flat-footed.

              Honestly, he had no insight to improve hitting, but he did make the team more nimble and fleet-footed compared to prior seasons.
              What your soccer, turned baseball coach probably didn't know is a runner is supposed to take an angle to the base so he can time hitting the base with the proper foot. Therefore, there is no reason to break stride. If there's any "breaking of stride" it's done when the angle starts not when hitting the base. If a runner ran hard straight to the base he would probably end up running on the outfield grass after his turn.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tg643 View Post
                What your soccer, turned baseball coach probably didn't know is a runner is supposed to take an angle to the base so he can time hitting the base with the proper foot. Therefore, there is no reason to break stride. If there's any "breaking of stride" it's done when the angle starts not when hitting the base. If a runner ran hard straight to the base he would probably end up running on the outfield grass after his turn.
                That's exactly what he did. He let me know that angling-up was better than double-stepping (for lack of a better term) to maintain speed. Honestly, our team was 200% better at running bases when he got involved... though it may have hindered our hitting, but that didn't stand out for me.
                "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ben Grimm View Post
                  That's exactly what he did. He let me know that angling-up was better than double-stepping (for lack of a better term) to maintain speed. Honestly, our team was 200% better at running bases when he got involved... though it may have hindered our hitting, but that didn't stand out for me.
                  Taking the correct angle isn't rocket science. It's fundamental base running.

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