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  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by Roothog66 View Post
    I also choose to bat first when I'm playing a powerhouse in pool. Chances are I'm not pitching one of my top four pitchers. I know there is no chance I'm going to be on the good end of a run rule and if I get run ruled, I want it to be in the home half of the inning where the game ends on the run rule rather than in the top of the fourth where they can beat us by the run rule + however many they add on. That's one of the idiotic rules of most organizations- that they break ties by runs against. In that case, it's better to lose 15-0 than to lose 17-16.
    On the flip side of that rule is where you win games like 3-2 and 4-3 and have a seed higher than the masher bombers who win 14-7. Defense is paramount in youth tournaments! We, like you, Root, try to pitch backwards. Doesn't always happen. Runs against is your key statistic. When we play a top team in pool we typically throw our best in order to keep runs low and force them to do the same so we don't have to face them again until late Sunday. I do see a lot of teams do what y'all do against us to preserve seeding. If we can get by in pool without playing the best team then are top four are closers or middle relief for an inning. Just another way.

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  • Roothog66
    replied
    Originally posted by Bolts-Baseball View Post
    Coach Chet Lemon always chooses to bat first. When teams go up 5-10 runs before the other team bats, it's a high hurdle to overcome...
    I also choose to bat first when I'm playing a powerhouse in pool. Chances are I'm not pitching one of my top four pitchers. I know there is no chance I'm going to be on the good end of a run rule and if I get run ruled, I want it to be in the home half of the inning where the game ends on the run rule rather than in the top of the fourth where they can beat us by the run rule + however many they add on. That's one of the idiotic rules of most organizations- that they break ties by runs against. In that case, it's better to lose 15-0 than to lose 17-16.

    Leave a comment:


  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    OK, that's good enough right there.

    I surf three or fours days a week, so if you're ever planning a "surf trip" out to SoCal, hit me up, and I'll take you to some of the "spots" () out here.
    Wow. California surfing would be excellent. But I misspoke. I'm not going to teach him to surf. I'm clueless. But I want to get him lessons when he is about 12. There are some neat programs available here for youth. I also have some baseball friends who are into surfing.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by DerekD View Post
    Don't take this the wrong way but I have to ask. Who's in charge of this team? IMO, you need to have a sit down and make your thoughts clear on what you're going to do. You're talking about a spending a LOT of time together. I can almost guarantee that a couple of things are going to happen. First, there will be some friction build between you two. You're going to start to dislike coming to ballpark and may cease to enjoy what you're doing. I get the whole "it's for the kids thing" but I would never would have gotten into coaching/teaching if I didn't enjoy it. Second, in front of parents, he'll start disagreeing with what you're doing. I don't think I need to describe what happens when that happens.

    Second, as far as parents go, I was never there to baby them. However, you could either hold a pre-practice meeting with your team to explain what you'll be working on for that practice and allow the parents to hear this. Or allow the parents to gather in with the players to your post-practice recap of key points. I prefer the latter because you can also discuss your team's next event so there's no confusion there either.
    My assistant coach is a good guy. We get along well. He understands that I'm the manager, and he's okay with taking my approach. We haven't had a lot of time to discuss strategies, game plans, philosophies, etc. We've only known each other for a few months. But we've already established mutual respect and can discuss things without getting hotheaded or bent out of shape. He knows I'm new at this level of baseball, and he's done nothing but try to help me make the transition and learn the ropes.

    I'll be making sure he understands why I want to do things a certain way, and I'll be open to listening to him when he feels that we should take a different approach. In time, we'll see which works best. Neither of us can argue with results. Take the throw to home as an example. It cost us runs. He'll understand why I want to do things my way. And I understand, too, that we'll be able to throw home to stop the run from scoring once we have a little more seasoning.

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  • DerekD
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    Me and my assistant coach don't adhere to the same philosophy, and your mention of taking outs reminds me of that fact. Yesterday, the pitcher fielded a grounder with a runner on third and one out. He hollered for the pitcher to throw home. The catcher couldn't hang on. I would have preferred trading a run for an out. That team scored three more runs with two outs in that inning. None of those runs would have scored if he hadn't hollered.

    He also had the third baseman holding the runner just like the first baseman would do, and he did the same at second base. I didn't like that at all. Guys were out of position all over the infield. When I made it home last night, I did some checking on different philosophies. I'm of the opinion that you only go to the bag if the runner is getting a big lead. And, if you go to the bag, the pitcher needs to throw over. Otherwise, the coach and runner will pick up quickly on the fact that the fielder going to the bag means absolutely nothing.

    We have to work more on pick off throws, too. I tried to focus on that one day, and parents were jumping out of their skin because it was too slow for them. That is why I asked for help on a drill, and I got help. So now I know how to work on that.

    My kids also forgot how to take a secondary lead. They got their secondary leads when the ball reached the catcher. We talked to them about getting that second lead when the pitcher has committed to going to the plate. It's tough for them to grasp that concept. Once they figure it out, we'll be able to run the bases like some of the more seasoned teams.

    If we can work on those things along with catching stuff, pitch accuracy and outfield defense, we'll be a competitive bunch.

    Don't take this the wrong way but I have to ask. Who's in charge of this team? IMO, you need to have a sit down and make your thoughts clear on what you're going to do. You're talking about a spending a LOT of time together. I can almost guarantee that a couple of things are going to happen. First, there will be some friction build between you two. You're going to start to dislike coming to ballpark and may cease to enjoy what you're doing. I get the whole "it's for the kids thing" but I would never would have gotten into coaching/teaching if I didn't enjoy it. Second, in front of parents, he'll start disagreeing with what you're doing. I don't think I need to describe what happens when that happens.

    Second, as far as parents go, I was never there to baby them. However, you could either hold a pre-practice meeting with your team to explain what you'll be working on for that practice and allow the parents to hear this. Or allow the parents to gather in with the players to your post-practice recap of key points. I prefer the latter because you can also discuss your team's next event so there's no confusion there either.

    Leave a comment:


  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by tg643 View Post
    The glitzy uniform thing has always cracked me up. When I had a team we had logo'es tees along with a vest and a game jersey. As long as it was warm enough the team always wanted to play in the tees. Even my son's prospect showcase team with the same setup preferred wearing the tees. It's not who looks the best. It's who plays the best.
    Same thing..we started with the vest and kids liked the plain practice t shirt better.we do get them nice little backpacks and helmets and batting gloves but the kids like the basic performance t shirts now..saves money!

    Leave a comment:


  • skipper5
    replied
    Originally posted by tg643 View Post
    Even when my son played on a 24 man roster in showcase ball he found the end of the bench to be fun as long as it didn't become habit. It's a party at the end of the bench.
    Seldom expressed. But true.

    Leave a comment:


  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I don't know the situation of each player on my team. But I would encourage them to expose their kids to other activities. We have middle school basketball here. I hope my boy makes it on that team. We'll play some golf together soon. I'm going to teach him to surf as soon as he is a strong swimmer. He's not allowed to play football.

    Ideally, I'd like to develop a roster of about 15 players, including four part-timers. And I'd like to have a list of about 10 other kids who can fill holes in a pinch. This would allow kids to miss tournaments due to vacations, all-star tournaments, family events or just a relaxing weekend without baseball.

    During the winter and summer months, my goal is to practice twice per week and to play one tournament per month. I hope to play about 10 tournaments and 10 Sunday scrimmages per year. So that leaves a lot of weekends open for other stuff.
    Sounds like a good workload.if they play other sports...skills learned will show in their footwork and agility. If kids are new to Tb that's about 50 games in estimation...plenty for 10. I might caution you on having only 11 fulltimers and four pt for the fall. Do your kids play other sports? You might just try carrying more kids on a permanent basis for the fall. We have twelve both seasons ideally..reasoning is if you are good enough to be on the team you are going to play. If you can develop kids to play at least two postions at an above average level then you are more flexible defensively. A list of 3-4 kids a year younger to call up if need be is all that's needed then. In the fall call those kids up when your older ones have a football game which conflicts.

    Leave a comment:


  • tg643
    replied
    One option if you're going to play a lot of games is have a larger roster of players and rotate them in on different days. Even when my son played on a 24 man roster in showcase ball he found the end of the bench to be fun as long as it didn't become habit. It's a party at the end of the bench.

    Leave a comment:


  • tg643
    replied
    The glitzy uniform thing has always cracked me up. When I had a team we had logo'es tees along with a vest and a game jersey. As long as it was warm enough the team always wanted to play in the tees. Even my son's prospect showcase team with the same setup preferred wearing the tees. It's not who looks the best. It's who plays the best.

    Leave a comment:


  • mudvnine
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I'm going to teach him to surf as soon as he is a strong swimmer.
    OK, that's good enough right there.

    I surf three or fours days a week, so if you're ever planning a "surf trip" out to SoCal, hit me up, and I'll take you to some of the "spots" () out here.

    Leave a comment:


  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    JMO, but that just sounds like too much baseball for nine and ten year olds. When do they get exposed to other sports that they may find that they enjoy more, or are better at? What's your long-term goal by having these kids play almost year round?
    I don't know the situation of each player on my team. But I would encourage them to expose their kids to other activities. We have middle school basketball here. I hope my boy makes it on that team. We'll play some golf together soon. I'm going to teach him to surf as soon as he is a strong swimmer. He's not allowed to play football.

    Ideally, I'd like to develop a roster of about 15 players, including four part-timers. And I'd like to have a list of about 10 other kids who can fill holes in a pinch. This would allow kids to miss tournaments due to vacations, all-star tournaments, family events or just a relaxing weekend without baseball.

    During the winter and summer months, my goal is to practice twice per week and to play one tournament per month. I hope to play about 10 tournaments and 10 Sunday scrimmages per year. So that leaves a lot of weekends open for other stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • mudvnine
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    Right now, it looks like we'll be doing travel from mid-November to mid-March and June to mid-September. I suspect that some parents will feel overwhelmed with both travel and rec ball. I might be one of them. It seems like it would be simple to ease up on the travel ball. But there are sure to be a few parents who can't get enough of it. It's definitely addictive. It's a nice way to spend family time. At the same time, I'd like my boy and his friends to have a shot at some sort of Dixie state championship or Little League state tournament berth. So I'm keeping my options open for now and will likely stay with rec ball for the foreseeable future.
    JMO, but that just sounds like too much baseball for nine and ten year olds. When do they get exposed to other sports that they may find that they enjoy more, or are better at? What's your long-term goal by having these kids play almost year round?

    I've seen more kids who start playing baseball exclusively.....even at 12, who end up burned out on the sport by the time they reach HS, just a year or two later.

    As I mentioned in another thread, year round baseball can be very demanding time wise on "family actives" and without an actual break or downtime, that much is missed out on when they're young.....that you can never get back.

    As you mention, it can be "addictive", but as I look back, I have to ask, "for who.....the parents or the players?

    Just another parent's point of view.


    Best wishes, and good luck, whichever path you choose,
    mud -
    Last edited by mudvnine; 09-09-2012, 04:29 PM.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Originally posted by raptor View Post
    If you decide to do both treat rec like scrimmages...move people around, pitch everyone one inning, use it to work on stuff. I think the heart of what dmac is saying is that you would like your number of practices to outnumber or at least equal your games to your team to get better. It is hard to do that playing rec and travel.
    Essentially, that's the plan. I have three travel kids on my rec team and two more that have an open invitation to join us. I want to use those games to work on their pitching and defense. I can move some of my best kids to the outfield, where they can develop the skills they need to play out there. At the same time, it gives some of the less-skilled players a chance to learn how to play the infield positions.

    Leave a comment:


  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I'm not sure what to do down the road. Right now, it looks like we'll be doing travel from mid-November to mid-March and June to mid-September. I suspect that some parents will feel overwhelmed with both travel and rec ball. I might be one of them. It seems like it would be simple to ease up on the travel ball. But there are sure to be a few parents who can't get enough of it. It's definitely addictive. It's a nice way to spend family time. At the same time, I'd like my boy and his friends to have a shot at some sort of Dixie state championship or Little League state tournament berth. So I'm keeping my options open for now and will likely stay with rec ball for the foreseeable future.
    If you decide to do both treat rec like scrimmages...move people around, pitch everyone one inning, use it to work on stuff. I think the heart of what dmac is saying is that you would like your number of practices to outnumber or at least equal your games to your team to get better. It is hard to do that playing rec and travel.

    Leave a comment:

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