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Youth Catchers

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  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by daque View Post
    Those posting have a pretty good grasp of the impact of heat and humidity on catchers. I never had a catcher pitching in the same season and also the reverse. How do you handle pregame and intragame hydration issues? How about salt replacement? Unfortunately most coaches do not have the luxury of three good quality catchers and have some overlap with pitchers because of the arm strength.
    We have a team cooler full of waters...Gatorade is for after the game. We preach hydrating the day before a game ia just as important. When its over 100 most players will drink a bottle of water of water every inning. If a coach goes out to talk to a pitcher he will bring a bottle out for them to sip. Most kids have frogg toggs for their necks as well.

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  • daque
    replied
    Those posting have a pretty good grasp of the impact of heat and humidity on catchers. I never had a catcher pitching in the same season and also the reverse. How do you handle pregame and intragame hydration issues? How about salt replacement? Unfortunately most coaches do not have the luxury of three good quality catchers and have some overlap with pitchers because of the arm strength.

    Leave a comment:


  • raptor
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    I'm just saying that the number of throws received is a better measure of how much work a catcher has put in. I do recognize that the wear is primarily on the legs. And that's something I have given insufficient consideration to in the past. I'll be making a strong effort in the future to avoid having a kid pitch after catching. If I could hit rewind, I think I'd find that some of my pitchers' control issues were related to fatigue caused by catching for the first two innings of a game.
    That is an accurate assessment and one which many coaches fail to make. If I could rewind and start over with 8u Id start at catching depth and develop from there. Since you are only carrying 12 the more kids who can catch the greater flexibility you have defensively depending on who is pitching. If your best catcher is also one of your best pitchers you have to rest him.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    I'm just saying that the number of throws received is a better measure of how much work a catcher has put in. I do recognize that the wear is primarily on the legs. And that's something I have given insufficient consideration to in the past. I'll be making a strong effort in the future to avoid having a kid pitch after catching. If I could hit rewind, I think I'd find that some of my pitchers' control issues were related to fatigue caused by catching for the first two innings of a game.

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  • tg643
    replied
    Originally posted by HeinekenMan View Post
    Is pitch count a better tool than innings caught? If it works for pitchers, shouldn't it work for the catchers, too?
    Catchers make very few hard throws. It's more about their legs.

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    Is pitch count a better tool than innings caught? If it works for pitchers, shouldn't it work for the catchers, too?

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  • HeinekenMan
    replied
    We have three solid catchers. In a doubleheader, our main catcher will go three innings in the first game. Then we make a switch. If the weather is severe, those two will not catch in the second game. We use another catcher for the first three innings of the second game and we have a fourth guy who can get the job done for a few innings. Soon, we'll have a day where we'll have three games. It seems like we'd probably use the catchers from the first game again in the third game. But I'd like to have a fifth catcher for that situation.

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  • tg643
    replied
    When I coached preteen travel catchers did not catch back to back games. The only time they might catch two in a day would be a four hour break between games. At 9U and 10U the catcher and centerfielder swapped positions each game. At 11U and 12U we had four catchers. I never had a kid catch, then pitch. Tired legs are not condusive to proper mechanics. When my son was twelve in LL all-stars it was high heat, high humidity the entire month. Catching twelve games and practicing every day over a month he lost ten pounds. That was with resting during the day and hydrating. When a kid starts by weighing 100 that's 10% loss of weight.

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  • raptor
    replied
    Last year we knew we needed four catchers because our number one was leaving like every year when school is out to join his dad at an pro complex. We played the summer with three serviceable catchers..none any serious threat to throw runners out but decent receivers and blockers. We knew we had to rotate them every couple of innings and we did. It hurt us greatly as we couldnt pitch certain guys because they caught the game..the best teams not only save their best pitchers in tournament play they likewise save their catchers. This year we added two catchers equal to our number one last year..I just cant stress enough the importance of the position. I think if you rotate catchers properly at youth levels..by that I mean every two or three innings.then a rest period like a normal position player is enough..but if you have one who logs more than 50% of pitches than a rest period like a pitcher is needed. You can see a catchers legs go out when he runs after a foul pop.

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  • d-mac
    replied
    Most coaches are clueless about catchers. I watched travel ball teams catch the same kid in back to back games in 100+ degree heat.

    We rotate anywhere from two to four catchers depending on the heat. When it is hot (hot around here is 100+ with 90% humidity), we may catch two kids one game and they rotate from catcher to the bench every inning. Then those two don't catch the next game. Coaches and parents don't understand the toll that catching takes on the body. If you catch a kid an entire game in brutal heat, not only are you taking a huge safety risk, but the kid is going be useless when it is his turn to bat.

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  • daque
    started a topic Youth Catchers

    Youth Catchers

    I posted the following elsewhere on this site with no interest. It was suggested that I try posting it here. So I will give it one final effort.

    I am mainly referring to small diamond ploayers. Lots of conversations exist regarding keeping the pitchers safe but nearly nothing about the catchers. With the season closing down, well for the Northern states, it is time to review what changes should be initiated for catchers. This is especially the case with high temperatures and humidity. How do you determine when a catcher has had enough or too much? What are your thoughts on catching double headers? What limitations do you set for a catcher? How much down time between seasons should be given? Between games? Let's get a conversation started of positive thoughts on this topic. Share your experiences and biases in a helpful manner.

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