Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The bunt and slash

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    They lost 2-1 in nine innings. But he scored the tying run in the 7th. In the 9th drilling him put the go ahead run on base. He stoled second and was stranded. His bunt was the only hit the entire game. That one pitcher was a stud. He's pitching in the Big East now.

    They beat this team in the semis of elimination play. Our team had deeper pitching. But there was an entertaining event. The number nine hitter crushed a homer into the left field screen. When my son (5'4" in 14U) came up that coach yelled, "Move in. He's a runt. He's a bunter." My son gapped one that rolled to the 394 mark in right-center. He jogged it from third to home.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by tg643 View Post
      Speaking of retaliation my son took one in the back for breaking up a no-hitter with a bunt in the 7th (last inning). He violated one of the unwritten rules of baseball. However, through his eyes he was leading of the last inning, losing 1-0 looking for a way to get on. He was bunted to second, stoled third and scored when the throw went into left. He got drilled two innings later. This is one where I agree with my son. But I understood the coach's approach.
      Dumb move by the opposing coach if it's intentional. You can break up a no-hitter with a bunt in the last inning if the score is 1-0. It's just ridiculous- mis-application of an unwritten rule here. A little knowledge is dangerous sometimes.
      Major Figure/Internet Influencer

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by tg643 View Post
        Speaking of retaliation my son took one in the back for breaking up a no-hitter with a bunt in the 7th (last inning). He violated one of the unwritten rules of baseball. However, through his eyes he was leading of the last inning, losing 1-0 looking for a way to get on. He was bunted to second, stoled third and scored when the throw went into left. He got drilled two innings later. This is one where I agree with my son. But I understood the coach's approach.
        duplicate post
        Major Figure/Internet Influencer

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by tg643 View Post
          Speaking of retaliation my son took one in the back for breaking up a no-hitter with a bunt in the 7th (last inning). He violated one of the unwritten rules of baseball. However, through his eyes he was leading of the last inning, losing 1-0 looking for a way to get on. He was bunted to second, stoled third and scored when the throw went into left. He got drilled two innings later. This is one where I agree with my son. But I understood the coach's approach.
          In a 1-0 game...Anything goes. Little risky putting a batter on in a 1-0 game unless there are 2 outs.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by tg643 View Post
            Speaking of retaliation my son took one in the back for breaking up a no-hitter with a bunt in the 7th (last inning). He violated one of the unwritten rules of baseball. However, through his eyes he was leading of the last inning, losing 1-0 looking for a way to get on. He was bunted to second, stoled third and scored when the throw went into left. He got drilled two innings later. This is one where I agree with my son. But I understood the coach's approach.
            This sounds like the Ben Davis bunt that broke up Schilling's no-no. I disagreed with it too that it broke any rules. The batters in both situations were the tying runs. You have to get on no matter what it takes. They had to know your son had the speed to reach on a bunt. They should've played the corners in at the very least.

            Now, if the games was 4-0 or something like that where you need more than just that baserunner, it's legit to come after him.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by omg View Post
              That's interesting. Do you know what ages or levels it would start to be allowed, if any?
              I know that's it's banned through 14U in our travel league. The couple of rec programs that I know of that run 16U programs don't allow it. From what I can tell, it isn't allowed until HS.

              Comment


              • #22
                One youth ball sanctioning body plays by NFHS rules. I've never seen one slash below high school, except for once against us, and it was clearly not intentional; He squared and then his face (and 3B coach immediate look of disgust) said he recognized the sign wrong, and he pulled it back right away, and still swung anyway and fouled off the pitch. Their coaches were swiftly apologetic, and we acknowledged we knew he didn't mean to slash, but their kid was ejected. I don't know any youth coach who would teach a slash, even if they played a tournament which would allow it. Neither kids nor adults want to be involved in any part of that play. It's a non issue.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by skipper5 View Post
                  Intentionally drilled batters are also rare, in my corner of the world.
                  Internet baseball resembles Ty Cobb baseball.
                  Yes. It does seem like we got a whole lot of drilling, getting it in the back, and bean balling going on here.
                  Major Figure/Internet Influencer

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
                    I know that's it's banned through 14U in our travel league. The couple of rec programs that I know of that run 16U programs don't allow it. From what I can tell, it isn't allowed until HS.
                    Thanks, I can see that. Now, getting back to hs and above, what situations would cause a coach to call the bunt/slash as opposed to letting the batter hit, calling a bunt, or a hit and run?
                    Major Figure/Internet Influencer

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      If that team has propensity to run the wheel. Everyone is moving expecting a bunt.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I saw bunt and slash against my son's high school team twice. After the first time where a left hitter nearly took the head off the third baseman they practiced how to defense the play. On the next pitch whether it's the same hitter or the next hitter, the catcher sets up on the outside corner and the pitcher comes up an in with a fastball. My son said from knowing players on other teams in the conference, the word spread quickly don't try this on his team.

                        In showcase/scout league level ball hitters are trying to prove they can drive the ball, not trick their way on to base. You don't see the play. No one wants to come off like a bush leaguer. The one time an opposing hitter went for the ankle of the first baseman and got it he was drilled in his next at bat.

                        Someone tried the bunt and slash on our 16U team full of fifteen year olds. The kid on the mound had the kind of control to knock the zit of the rear of a gnat. The next time the hitter came up he dotted the eye on his uniform. He wasn't told to drill the kid. He had only learned teammates stick up for teammates.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I coached in a 14 year old game in which there was a bunt and slash and a suicide squeeze. I appreciate that adults/leagues are concerned about safety so I don't have a problem with leagues banning the bunt and slash.

                          In this game, the bunt and slash was called the pitch after a bunt was missed. The infielders really only get to about 70 feet from the batter which is 20 feet in from the base line and still 10 feet deeper from where the pitcher is. By getting to 60 or 70 feet from the batter that allows the fielder plenty of time to field a bunt fairly routinely unless it is a brilliant bunt. So I don't see this as some outrageously dangerous play.

                          With the suicide squeeze the runner is running full speed towards the batter and is about 45 feet away from the batter when the ball is at the plate. I'd say it's more dangerous than the bunt and slash.

                          Neither play is more dangerous than, say, a routine pop fly between the second baseman, the right fielder, and the center fielder.
                          Last edited by omg; 10-29-2012, 02:09 PM.
                          Major Figure/Internet Influencer

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by omg View Post
                            I coached in a 14 year old game in which there was a bunt and slash and a suicide squeeze. I appreciate that adults/leagues are concerned about safety so I don't have a problem with leagues banning the bunt and slash.

                            In this game, the bunt and slash was called the pitch after a bunt was missed. The infielders really only get to about 70 feet from the batter which is 20 feet in from the base line and still 10 feet deeper from where the pitcher is. By getting to 60 or 70 feet from the batter that allows the fielder plenty of time to field a bunt fairly routinely unless it is a brilliant bunt. So I don't see him it as some outrageously dangerous play.

                            With the suicide squeeze the runner is running full speed towards the batter and is about 45 feet away from the batter when the ball is at the plate. I'd say it's more dangerous than the bunt and slash.

                            Neither play is more dangerous than, say, a routine pop fly between the second baseman, the right fielder, and the center fielder.
                            Can't really compare those situations, as a team will never put on the "let's hit a popup in that one spot where there could be confusion and an injury" play. One situation is part of normal game play, the other (slash) is bringing the potential for serious injury into play willingly. As for the suicide, as long as the hitter picks up the suicide sign and gives a recognition sign then that play isn't dangerous...if the coach isnt 100% sure the hitter recognizes it, he should wipe it.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by raptor View Post
                              Can't really compare those situations, as a team will never put on the "let's hit a popup in that one spot where there could be confusion and an injury" play. One situation is part of normal game play, the other (slash) is bringing the potential for serious injury into play willingly. As for the suicide, as long as the hitter picks up the suicide sign and gives a recognition sign then that play isn't dangerous...if the coach isnt 100% sure the hitter recognizes it, he should wipe it.
                              So should we avoid teaching batters to hit the ball up the middle, to hit the ball hard right at the pitcher's forehead?

                              And "as long as the hitter gives a recognition sign" is a pretty big if for a 14 year old-it doesn't ensure he will go brain dead 5 seconds later. Wilson Ramos almost killed Roger Bernandina this year on a squeeze at the mlb level.

                              And the "slash" part of the bunt and slash is a choppy semi-flat footed swing and not a regular swing. I guess we could argue until the cows came home. Like I said, I don't have a problem with leagues banning the slash-just pointing out that it is not all that dangerous relative to everything else.
                              Last edited by omg; 10-28-2012, 07:37 PM.
                              Major Figure/Internet Influencer

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by omg View Post
                                So should we avoid teaching batters to hit the ball up the middle, to hit the ball hard right at the pitcher's forehead?
                                "Hit it hard up the middle" is a great thought and helps one hit the ball hard everywhere. But this is another instance where it is part of normal game-play. Although I have never heard the instruction to hit it at the pitcher's forehead..is that a cue you use?

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X