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  • Fever photos

    Ok, so I know you guys love video to show examples, prove a point, whatever the case may be.

    And I'm not sure how many of you venture into other areas of Baseball-Fever, but just wanted to share this. Some amazing shots of fielders and hitters.

    http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...re-Photo-Finds (check out the bottom pic of Mantle in post #2) How friekin' beautiful is that!

  • #2
    I cant go over there. I will spend days and days if I don't stop myself.
    efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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    • #3
      I feel Bill Burgess is one of the best historians the game has...
      If you go to the history board prepare a tray with lunch, dinner, drinks, bring the phone, etc., etc., .... You'll be there awhile!
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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      • #4
        Awww...we're all nice over there Jake

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        • #5
          Bill that was an amazing experience going over and reading the linked thread! Thank you!!!
          Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

          I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

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          • #6
            Wow... I just blew an hour looking at some amazing old photos.....I wish you didn't post this...there goes work tomorrow

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
              Awww...we're all nice over there Jake
              Sultan,
              I feel all you guys are amazing. You and the other history enthusiasts help us (parents/coaches/teachers/etc.) keep what we do in perspective.
              When I get too wrapped up in what we talk about here - I take a gander at the History Board. It's a stark reminder we are just a very small piece in a very large tradition.

              Jake
              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Cannonball View Post
                Bill that was an amazing experience going over and reading the linked thread! Thank you!!!
                He would appreciate your compliment. My name is Randy, and while I've helped Bill a great deal posting photos (mostly to the Babe Ruth Thread), he did INCREDIBLE work on that one. Some mind-blowing shots for sure.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
                  Sultan,
                  I feel all you guys are amazing. You and the other history enthusiasts help us (parents/coaches/teachers/etc.) keep what we do in perspective.
                  When I get too wrapped up in what we talk about here - I take a gander at the History Board. It's a stark reminder we are just a very small piece in a very large tradition.

                  Jake
                  I'm kind of a rare case, in that I've played all my life and understand the nuances on the field, but have studied historical subjects as well. I come here for a break from the Bonds apologists from time to time HAHA.

                  Don't always agree with everyone, but that's what discussions are for, eh? And with the kids' best interest in mind, everyone wins

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                  • #10
                    Wow! I spent 45 minutes looking at ONLY that linked thread...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                      He would appreciate your compliment. My name is Randy, and while I've helped Bill a great deal posting photos (mostly to the Babe Ruth Thread), he did INCREDIBLE work on that one. Some mind-blowing shots for sure.
                      Yes, these photos are great, thank you. It made me watch some of "Baseball" by Ken Burns last night. I saw a lot of video of Babe's swing. I'm pretty sure that the pitching had to be much, much slower than it is today because of what the Babe does with his feet. He even stepped with his back foot like a slow pitch softball player sometimes will. Feet close together, huge stride. Not taking anything away from the Babe. I know he was maybe the greatest player ever.
                      Major Figure

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by omg View Post
                        Yes, these photos are great, thank you. It made me watch some of "Baseball" by Ken Burns last night. I saw a lot of video of Babe's swing. I'm pretty sure that the pitching had to be much, much slower than it is today because of what the Babe does with his feet. He even stepped with his back foot like a slow pitch softball player sometimes will. Feet close together, huge stride. Not taking anything away from the Babe. I know he was maybe the greatest player ever.
                        Awesome omg, good to hear

                        A couple things....

                        I would say that in general, the pitching wasn't as fast as it is today but that doesn't make it worse necessarily. Your average starter back then probably had a fastball in the mid to upper 80's, but so did Maddux while he was dominating. They had their hard throwers too, the difference though, is that back then they didn't need to go max effort all the time. With the much larger strike zone, and spacious outfields, they could play around a bit, and pace themselves until they got into a pinch. Ruth sorta changed all that however, because now, him at bat even with nobody on, became a pinch lol. He hit Walter Johnson, who routinely threw in the upper 90's, at a very good clip despite using a 40+ oz bat. Babe could not face today's pitching, day in and day out, and use a bat that heavy imo.

                        Regarding Babe's approach, don't assume seeing one video means it was the norm. That could have been an exhibition game video or it could have been against an euphus pitch, who knows. But, Babe was creative, instinctive and spontaneous. Depending on the situation and the pitcher he would do different things.

                        Managers tried the shift on him early on, and he quickly proved he wasn't too proud to lace 'em the other way, often for extra bases. That brought them back to playing him honest. He's choked up against certain pitchers. He switched to a righty in the box many times, figuring it was the only way to get them to throw him strikes, even smacked a double righty. He went up righty in his last plate appearance, after having 3 homers in the game one time. So there was no set expectation with him.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948 View Post
                          Awesome omg, good to hear

                          A couple things....

                          I would say that in general, the pitching wasn't as fast as it is today but that doesn't make it worse necessarily. Your average starter back then probably had a fastball in the mid to upper 80's, but so did Maddux while he was dominating. They had their hard throwers too, the difference though, is that back then they didn't need to go max effort all the time. With the much larger strike zone, and spacious outfields, they could play around a bit, and pace themselves until they got into a pinch. Ruth sorta changed all that however, because now, him at bat even with nobody on, became a pinch lol. He hit Walter Johnson, who routinely threw in the upper 90's, at a very good clip despite using a 40+ oz bat. Babe could not face today's pitching, day in and day out, and use a bat that heavy imo.

                          Regarding Babe's approach, don't assume seeing one video means it was the norm. That could have been an exhibition game video or it could have been against an euphus pitch, who knows. But, Babe was creative, instinctive and spontaneous. Depending on the situation and the pitcher he would do different things.

                          Managers tried the shift on him early on, and he quickly proved he wasn't too proud to lace 'em the other way, often for extra bases. That brought them back to playing him honest. He's choked up against certain pitchers. He switched to a righty in the box many times, figuring it was the only way to get them to throw him strikes, even smacked a double righty. He went up righty in his last plate appearance, after having 3 homers in the game one time. So there was no set expectation with him.
                          Very interesting, thanks.
                          Major Figure

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by omg View Post
                            I saw a lot of video of Babe's swing. I'm pretty sure that the pitching had to be much, much slower than it is today because of what the Babe does with his feet. He even stepped with his back foot like a slow pitch softball player sometimes will. Feet close together, huge stride.
                            I'm trying to understand for the life of me how the length of the stride relates to the speed of pitches. I'm coming up blank.

                            -------------
                            He hit Walter Johnson, who routinely threw in the upper 90's
                            In 1912, Walter Johnson went to Bridgeport, CT at the Remington Arms Co. bullet testing range to test his speed. He threw today's 50 ft equivalent at 95 mph (75 feet out of his hand it was recorded at 83 mph)
                            Last edited by songtitle; 11-28-2012, 04:07 PM.
                            efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by songtitle View Post
                              I'm trying to understand for the life of me how the length of the stride relates to the speed of pitches. I'm coming up blank.
                              It doesn't songtitle. Omg saw a video, where Ruth literally started at the back of the box, and did a side step shimmy forward before striding to hit. Think almost like a Happy Gilmore baseball swing. It was probably either an exhibition game or the pitcher threw a big euphus curve.

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