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Is it better for my son to play SS on worst team or OF for best team?

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  • Is it better for my son to play SS on worst team or OF for best team?

    reached my decision thanks to a few PM's, thank you.
    Last edited by orickx; 01-06-2013, 07:28 PM.

  • #2
    At 9 he should play where ever he will have the most fun and play the most positions. At this age its about learning and not what starting position he will be playing.

    The only wildcard is, the professional training he will receive if he goes on with the new team.
    Do you know how many times we have heard this??? At 9 - keep things in perspective.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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    • #3
      The purpose of preteen baseball is to have fun, learn fundamentals, learn to compete and build a passion for the game. Unfortunately former pros have pulled a con over on gullible parents for the purpose of earning a living. They have led parents to believe if they don't start forking over a lot of money to train their preteen, the kid will fall behind.

      It doesn't matter what position your son plays and where he plays as long as he's having fun. If he develops into a high school baseball player chances are he will play several positions between now and then. What you will find in high school is almost every starter was a nine year old shortstop. But not every nine year old shortstop makes the high school team.

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      • #4
        I'm guessing since our original poster deleted his post he didn't see the response he was looking for. Given people take time to respond and situations may apply to many people, it's rude and inconsiderate to delete the original post.

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        • #5
          Play for the best coach.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tg643 View Post
            I'm guessing since our original poster deleted his post he didn't see the response he was looking for. Given people take time to respond and situations may apply to many people, it's rude and inconsiderate to delete the original post.
            Or as he said, he got the "response" he needed privately, and didn't want to head down the nonsensical trail that most of these "what should my 9 y/o player do?", questions take.

            Given no one is forced or required to spend anytime responding, it's not his worry, nor inconsiderate that he remove his original post.....it's his to do as he pleases.

            Besides, "Trad" got it correct anyway....in not so many words.
            In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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            • #7
              The problem with coaches is that you simply don't know what many of them are gonna be like. You think they're gonna be great, then halfway through the season you see their true colors.

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              • #8
                Unfortunate....
                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tg643 View Post
                  Unfortunately former pros have pulled a con over on gullible parents for the purpose of earning a living. They have led parents to believe if they don't start forking over a lot of money to train their preteen, the kid will fall behind.
                  That's quite a broad statement. I suspect there are just as many well-intended former pros than those you describe. Unless you've actually met these particular coaches and know their character, it's unjust to paint them as cons. The OP didn't have a negative thing to say about them. Only that they were former pros and even with all those extra training days and tournaments, the cost for their program was less than his current team.

                  And what's wrong with baseball professionals making a living in their field? There are good and bad in every field.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CoolHandLuke View Post
                    And what's wrong with baseball professionals making a living in their field?
                    IMHO nothing.... But if you think their priority is helping your child then you are naive, they are there to build a business, and - for the most part- your child is nothing more than a sale. This does not mean they don't care - most who want to build their business do care. YOU need to be the one watching your child's back in these situation. Do not rely on the "pro."
                    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
                      IMHO nothing.... But if you think their priority is helping your child then you are naive, they are there to build a business, and - for the most part- your child is nothing more than a sale. This does not mean they don't care - most who want to build their business do care. YOU need to be the one watching your child's back in these situation. Do not rely on the "pro."
                      I agree that this is a broad statement that we don't generally associate with other fields like, say, music instructors or dance schools. However, it's a common sentiment. Do you think that the field of baseball instruction has more of a problem with this than other similar fields of youth instruction? By the way, this is a serious question and not a snide comment. I believe the perception is that this is true, I just wonder if that perception is justified.

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                      • #12
                        What is/was arguably the marquis soccer club in St. Louis has drastically diluted its brand by adopting what is essentially a, "If you can write the check, we'll find your kid a team," attitude. As a result, while they do have some very good teams and players at the top of the pyramid, the majority of their teams are now at best competitive (and my son's 1-team per age group club team routinely pounds them 5-0 or 6-0). The guys on the lower-tier teams are basically just paying the bills for the fancy facilities, but those kids aren't getting the level of instruction that the club is/was known for.

                        Whenever I hear about big baseball programs making promises of top-tier instruction, this comes to mind.
                        Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                        I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

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                        • #13
                          Ok I'll try to answer....
                          Originally posted by Roothog66 View Post
                          I agree that this is a broad statement that we don't generally associate with other fields like, say, music instructors or dance schools. However, it's a common sentiment. Do you think that the field of baseball instruction has more of a problem with this than other similar fields of youth instruction?
                          Yes I do. I am uncertain why.
                          I coached basketball for more than a decade and did not see the same level of people trying to make a living off the hopes and dreams of kids as I did in baseball.
                          "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                          - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                          Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
                            IMHO nothing.... But if you think their priority is helping your child then you are naive, they are there to build a business, and - for the most part- your child is nothing more than a sale. This does not mean they don't care - most who want to build their business do care. YOU need to be the one watching your child's back in these situation. Do not rely on the "pro."
                            Since I was asked, I can't do better than this response.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jake Patterson View Post
                              Ok I'll try to answer....
                              Yes I do. I am uncertain why.
                              I coached basketball for more than a decade and did not see the same level of people trying to make a living off the hopes and dreams of kids as I did in baseball.
                              Jake is nailing it today. I've only seen it in baseball and soccer. A goalie camp started recruiting my son at age ten. But, they got his name from the high school soccer coach. My son did not attend this camp until high school. He did so because he played travel baseball in the summer rather than travel soccer. He was the high school goalie. He was the only player on the team not playing for an elite summer soccer team (he was recruited by one of the best).
                              Last edited by tg643; 01-07-2013, 01:05 PM.

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