Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Parent intro letter to 8u rec league.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Parent intro letter to 8u rec league.

    Tell me what you think. I know grammer and spelling needs to be corrected, I'm just talking about the general content.

    Parents:

    My name is . I’ll be coaching your child this year in machine pitch baseball. Our roster is listed below so you can check to see if there are any familiar names. We will begin practice xxxx . I don’t have a full practice schedule yet but I’ll pass that along as soon as I receive it. Right now, this is what I need from each of you.

    1. Respond to this email.
    2. Let me know if your child’s name is spelled incorrectly below.
    3. Let me know if the shirt size listed by your child’s name is correct.

    Goals for this team

    To learn proper baseball fundamentals

    To learn the importance of, attitude, class, hustle, dedication.

    To have fun learning the game.

    To be competitive, as well as appreciate the difference between being competitive vs. winning.

    Expectations of parents

    Attendance/Punctuality- Please do your best to attend all of our practices and games on time. Missing not only affects your child but the rest of the team as well. Any child with perfect attendance will receive their entry fee back at the end of the year. (Yes I’m serious) This is how important this is to me.

    Communication- If there is something going on that you are not happy about, let’s talk about it together in person. If you are going to be late or miss an event, give me as much notice as you possibly can. You have my phone number, and my email address. I encourage you to use them. When I send emails that are time specific and request a confirmation please reply and let me know that you have the info. This way I won’t continue to try and reach you.

    Coaching from the stands- as hard as it is please make sure that your words to your child from the stands are positive and encouraging. Try to refrain from giving instructions from the stands. It will just lead to confusion.

    Class- If someone needs to speak to an umpire please let that person be me. We WILL be most classy team with the most classy bleachers if we are nothing else.

    What to expect from me

    My time- When baseball season starts this pretty much becomes one of my top priorities. Don’t tell my boss. You will get 100% from me 100% of the time. I’m not perfect and I will make mistakes. Not putting in the effort will never be one of those mistakes.

    Fairness- Positions and batting order will be earned on the practice and playing field and just as importantly in the dugout. Attitude and hustle means more to me that skill and results.

    Lead by example- Baseball means a lot more than learning correct fundamentals. For this age, it’s little things like keeping up with their own glove. Not having to go into the stands and sit with Aunt Betty during the game. Yes sir and no sir to the umpires and other coaches. Helping these little guys to develop into little men.

    Okay, that’s all I’ve got. I’m excited to get to know everybody. I’m looking forward to a fun season!

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by $tinky View Post
    Tell me what you think. I know grammer and spelling needs to be corrected, I'm just talking about the general content.

    Parents:

    My name is . I’ll be coaching your child this year in machine pitch baseball. Our roster is listed below so you can check to see if there are any familiar names. We will begin practice xxxx . I don’t have a full practice schedule yet but I’ll pass that along as soon as I receive it. Right now, this is what I need from each of you.

    1. Respond to this email.
    2. Let me know if your child’s name is spelled incorrectly below.
    3. Let me know if the shirt size listed by your child’s name is correct.

    Goals for this team

    To learn proper baseball fundamentals

    To learn the importance of, attitude, class, hustle, dedication.

    To have fun learning the game.

    To be competitive, as well as appreciate the difference between being competitive vs. winning.

    Expectations of parents

    Attendance/Punctuality- Please do your best to attend all of our practices and games on time. Missing not only affects your child but the rest of the team as well. Any child with perfect attendance will receive their entry fee back at the end of the year. (Yes I’m serious) This is how important this is to me.

    Communication- If there is something going on that you are not happy about, let’s talk about it together in person. If you are going to be late or miss an event, give me as much notice as you possibly can. You have my phone number, and my email address. I encourage you to use them. When I send emails that are time specific and request a confirmation please reply and let me know that you have the info. This way I won’t continue to try and reach you.

    Coaching from the stands- as hard as it is please make sure that your words to your child from the stands are positive and encouraging. Try to refrain from giving instructions from the stands. It will just lead to confusion.

    Class- If someone needs to speak to an umpire please let that person be me. We WILL be most classy team with the most classy bleachers if we are nothing else.

    What to expect from me

    My time- When baseball season starts this pretty much becomes one of my top priorities. Don’t tell my boss. You will get 100% from me 100% of the time. I’m not perfect and I will make mistakes. Not putting in the effort will never be one of those mistakes.

    Fairness- Positions and batting order will be earned on the practice and playing field and just as importantly in the dugout. Attitude and hustle means more to me that skill and results.

    Lead by example- Baseball means a lot more than learning correct fundamentals. For this age, it’s little things like keeping up with their own glove. Not having to go into the stands and sit with Aunt Betty during the game. Yes sir and no sir to the umpires and other coaches. Helping these little guys to develop into little men.

    Okay, that’s all I’ve got. I’m excited to get to know everybody. I’m looking forward to a fun season!

    Thanks
    I like the way it's organized and written.
    But for 8u rec., I wouldn't want a letter to form the parents' first impression of me as the coach.
    Since you only get once chance to form a first impression, face-to-face is better.
    How about you have a couple of practices, which will allow the kids and parents to see what a great guy you are, and then present them with a letter.
    Also, let them know it's coming.
    Last edited by skipper5; 01-13-2013, 03:18 PM.
    Skip

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree the content is great. I'd use that letter as an outline for a parents meeting. It's nice for parents to be able to meet you instead of being handed a form letter. This will also allow them to ask questions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dadair6 View Post
        I agree the content is great. I'd use that letter as an outline for a parents meeting. It's nice for parents to be able to meet you instead of being handed a form letter. This will also allow them to ask questions.
        You can get a feeling for the parents in a face to face meeting. Use the letter as an outline for your MANDATORY parents meeting. Then hand it to them after the meeting.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the feed back. I like the idea of having a practice or two then a meeting. Last thing I wanna do is come across as the little league Nazi. You never know how someone can interpret what they read.

          Comment


          • #6
            Stinky,
            Here's one of the letters I used:

            TMS Parents’ Code of Ethics

            I will always remember the game is for my child, not for me.

            I will respect all participants and spectators no matter what their race, creed or ability.

            I will always remain positive with my child and his teammates.

            I will not shout instructions to my child from the sidelines.

            I understand the responsibility of instructing my child during games and practices
            belongs to the coach.

            I will always encourage good sportsmanship and fair play.

            I will hold all my input, comments, and criticism for the coach or officials until after the
            game or practice and will present it in a positive manner away from the players.

            I will not interfere with practices or games.

            I will insist that my child play in a safe and healthy environment.

            I will insure my child is properly equipped.

            I will support the umpires and other league officials.

            I will always get my child to practice on time and pick him or her up on time and
            I acknowledge the coach is not a babysitter.

            I will require the league provide appropriate training for the coach and his or her staff.

            I will demand a drug, alcohol, and tobacco free environment and I will refrain from
            their use at all youth sports events.

            I will do my very best to make youth sports fun for my child.





            Copyright © 2004, Jake Patterson, How to Coach little League
            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's several more that we used...

              Team Philosophy

              Baseball is a team sport that requires intense individual commitment to learn and improve in order to be successful. One player not playing to their potential during the game can mean the difference between a win or a lost no matter how hard the other eight players are playing. In order to win it is the responsibility of every player on the team to:

              1. Be the absolute best you can be at every practice and game.

              2. Improve in your skills through practice.

              3. Work hard at becoming physically fit.

              4. Learn as much as you can about the game.

              5. Always support the team and your teammates.

              6. Always conduct yourself in a respectful manner and represent the town and school with pride.

              Everyone on the team needs to dedicate himself to the above. If you do, winning will follow. The desire to win goes without saying. We will always play to win the game. Remember however, improvement and sportsmanship are just as important as winning a game.

              ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Introduction Letter

              Dear Parents,

              XXX, and I are very excited about this season. So you know a little about us, Ray played baseball as a youngster in XXXXXXXX, CT. He continued playing baseball through high school and into college, playing for Kansas State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in XXXXXXXX. After college he continued playing semi-pro ball for the Manhattan Wildcats in the Midwest League. XXX is a Connecticut Certified Coach and has been coaching softball and baseball for more than 20 years coaching every level from Little League to high school.

              I have been coaching baseball for more than 20 years. I started as a Little League coach working my way to the high school ranks where I coached at the XXXXXX Preparatory School. I am also the head coach of the XXX Girl’s Basketball team. I have a Bachelor’s degree in business and youth counseling and a Master’s Degree in Education. I am a Connecticut State Certified Coach and a moderator for Baseball Fever, the world’s largest online baseball site. I have attended and organized numerous baseball and basketball coaching clinics and I have published two books on coaching.

              Our coaching philosophies are very basic. There are six things that mean we were successful as coaches. They are:

              1. We were able to get the absolute best out of the athletes.

              2. We left the athletes feeling more confident about themselves as a people and more confident in their abilities as athletes.

              3. They became, enjoyed and were comfortable being active members of the team.

              4. They excelled in the concept of sportsmanship and treating everyone politely.

              5. They learned the skills we taught them.

              6. We left them a little more prepared for life’s challenges.

              You will not hear us berating the athletes about winning. We feel that everyone who puts on a uniform, wears a glove or picks up a ball does not do so to lose. We believe in the basics, teamwork and sportsmanship. We will work hard for the athletes and expect hard work from them. We will listen to them when they need help. We will also listen to you, the parents, when you have suggestions and comments. We ask however, that you hold these comments or suggestions until after the games or practices. We also ask that you encourage and cheer for the team when they are playing. DO NOT yell instructions. They may be in conflict with the instructions they are getting from the bench. We won’t entertain the question from either the athlete or the parent “Why am I not playing much and (so-and-so) is?” I will however, always answer the question, “What do I need to do to improve my game?” We feel this to be fairer to the athlete and their teammates.

              Again, we are very excited about this season. If you have any questions, please call me at XXX-XXX-XXXX or contact me at: [email protected]
              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

              Comment


              • #8
                It's 8U rec. for 90% of the parents it's just something for Johnny to do. I doubt they're too interested in some long formal letter. Half the kids won't show up for practice and they will show up 15 minutes before the game. It's just for fun. That should be the point of the letter

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by themaker75 View Post
                  It's 8U rec. for 90% of the parents it's just something for Johnny to do. I doubt they're too interested in some long formal letter. Half the kids won't show up for practice and they will show up 15 minutes before the game. It's just for fun. That should be the point of the letter
                  Mine were obviousy geared toward older players, I would, however, recommend guidelines be establsihed at the beginning of the season every year at every age. I've seen over-zeloaus parents at every age group.
                  "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                  - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                  Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've coached rec basketball and LL. at that age it's just an activity for the kids at the rec level. I've personally never encountered any parents giving me a hard time and trust me I live in a town with real overbearing parents. I just try to make it fun and they learn by mistake. Little things like let the smallest kid take the jump ball, pick out of a hat for field positions, ect.
                    It's the travel sports even at 8 where parents get crazy. My letter at the rec level was just introducing myself and saying the kids would have fun win or lose. And in the end the kids will have some fun. I give my phone number and ask any parents to call or text if they have any concerns. In 8 seasons of sports no one has called. I'm also a popular coach because I offer to eery parent to pick up and drop off their kids from practice. I usually have my 6 extra seats full and its fine for me that I spend the extra time. The kids like car pooling with their friends. I pick the kids for the team based in who my son is friends with. Fun, fun and more fun. I don't get serious in rec. There's also a pizza party at the end of the season. With this approach I find that the kids actually listen and enjoy themselves. That's when they wind up learning.
                    I see some if the other coaches getting to technical and too serious and those kids aren't having fun. In 8 Seasons of baseball and basketball we have won the championship 4 times. It just happens when the kids are excited to show up for practice and every game.

                    Comment

                    Ad Widget

                    Collapse
                    Working...
                    X