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Verbal cue or teach to get extension after contact

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  • Verbal cue or teach to get extension after contact

    Hi all,
    My son has taken up a new habit (which I'm sure I helped create). After contact, his arms never get fully extended. Everything goes oppo. Is there a teach or should I just throw him a bunch of inside front toss and have him work on pulling the ball.

    I've tried to tell him to extend, "point to pitcher" after contact, but the tee drills haven't carried over to actual BP.

    I'm not 100% sure, but I think I may have caused this problem by showing him what he should look like at contact which is "not extended" at contact.

    Any drills or verbal cues appreciated.
    He's lost power and as I said, everything goes oppo.

    Thanks for any tips, or non-tips if I should just keep BP inside and have him try to pull/hit in front.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBvDUfqvLGs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JDKkDBhXhc
    Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

  • #2
    Originally posted by pthawaii View Post
    Hi all,
    My son has taken up a new habit (which I'm sure I helped create). After contact, his arms never get fully extended. Everything goes oppo. Is there a teach or should I just throw him a bunch of inside front toss and have him work on pulling the ball.

    I've tried to tell him to extend, "point to pitcher" after contact, but the tee drills haven't carried over to actual BP.

    I'm not 100% sure, but I think I may have caused this problem by showing him what he should look like at contact which is "not extended" at contact.

    Any drills or verbal cues appreciated.
    He's lost power and as I said, everything goes oppo.

    Thanks for any tips, or non-tips if I should just keep BP inside and have him try to pull/hit in front.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBvDUfqvLGs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JDKkDBhXhc
    Get him on the tee and have him swing slow motion. Have him stop at contact. Then, have him lock his arms. This will show him what extend mean. Also, have him go by-the-numbers (1) Load, (2) Stride, (3) Explode, (4) Hands, (5) Contact, (6) Extend. By-the-numbers is a great way to show each part of the swing fundamentals. Repetition is the best way for muscle memory. I know some instructors have different steps in the six step hitting process, or even have more or less steps. However, this is what I use for my students, and team members. This is just my recommendation to easily show your son the steps. I hope this helps you in any way.

    In addition, the extend is not the reason he is going oppo. This is a case of lack of timing on inside pitches, or getting his hand to far inside. To get around on an inside pitch the contact needs to be infront of the plate. It seems like he is letting the ball get to deep on an inside pitch. Quick question, do you know where contact should be for inside, middle, and outside pitches? If not, I can show you where contact should be. Let me know.
    Last edited by MD Diamond Sports; 01-20-2013, 11:46 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by MD Diamond Sports View Post

      This is a case of lack of timing on inside pitches, or getting his hand to far inside. To get around on an inside pitch the contact needs to be infront of the plate. It seems like he is letting the ball get to deep on an inside pitch. Quick question, do you know where contact should be for inside, middle, and outside pitches? If not, I can show you where contact should be. Let me know.
      Ha ha. Maybe his son got a little bit too much of "keep the hands inside the ball", "let the ball get deep".
      Major Figure

      Comment


      • #4
        Not sure if you know what does shoulder bypass mean. But I see your son powering his swing with his shoulder rotation. That makes the swing slow developing. Everything goes oppo due to the slower bat.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by omg View Post
          Ha ha. Maybe his son got a little bit too much of "keep the hands inside the ball", "let the ball get deep".
          Very good possibility. Not a big fan of those statements.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MD Diamond Sports View Post
            Get him on the tee and have him swing slow motion. Have him stop at contact. Then, have him lock his arms. This will show him what extend mean. Also, have him go by-the-numbers (1) Load, (2) Stride, (3) Explode, (4) Hands, (5) Contact, (6) Extend. By-the-numbers is a great way to show each part of the swing fundamentals. Repetition is the best way for muscle memory. I know some instructors have different steps in the six step hitting process, or even have more or less steps. However, this is what I use for my students, and team members. This is just my recommendation to easily show your son the steps. I hope this helps you in any way.

            In addition, the extend is not the reason he is going oppo. This is a case of lack of timing on inside pitches, or getting his hand to far inside. To get around on an inside pitch the contact needs to be infront of the plate. It seems like he is letting the ball get to deep on an inside pitch. Quick question, do you know where contact should be for inside, middle, and outside pitches? If not, I can show you where contact should be. Let me know.
            Thanks. Yep, awhile back we worked on hitting inside/outside/middle pitches (inside out in front, outside hit deeper in zone), we put balls on the ground to help provide a visual. We'll go back and do more of that work.
            Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by omg View Post
              Ha ha. Maybe his son got a little bit too much of "keep the hands inside the ball", "let the ball get deep".
              He hasn't heard "keep the hands inside the ball" but recently one coach did tell him to let the ball get deeper because he was lunging on his front leg.
              Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lancers View Post
                Not sure if you know what does shoulder bypass mean. But I see your son powering his swing with his shoulder rotation. That makes the swing slow developing. Everything goes oppo due to the slower bat.
                Not sure what that means.
                Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pthawaii View Post
                  He hasn't heard "keep the hands inside the ball" but recently one coach did tell him to let the ball get deeper because he was lunging on his front leg.
                  As I've said before, you may be overdoing some technical aspects. It seems like you have a really good relationship with your son and he likes to practice. I'd stick with mostly training for now. More often than not, "words" can lead to faulty mechanics as opposed to being natural. Especially at that age.
                  Major Figure

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pthawaii View Post
                    recently one coach did tell him to let the ball get deeper because he was lunging on his front leg.
                    NO! You should not teach one bad thing to make up for another bad thing. The coach should have worked on the lunging, and not compensated by teaching something wrong. No disrespect to the coach intended.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't know if this cue would help everyone with this problem, but it helped for my son to "throw the barrel at the ball".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MD Diamond Sports View Post
                        Get him on the tee and have him swing slow motion. Have him stop at contact. Then, have him lock his arms. This will show him what extend mean. Also, have him go by-the-numbers (1) Load, (2) Stride, (3) Explode, (4) Hands, (5) Contact, (6) Extend. By-the-numbers is a great way to show each part of the swing fundamentals. Repetition is the best way for muscle memory. I know some instructors have different steps in the six step hitting process, or even have more or less steps. However, this is what I use for my students, and team members. This is just my recommendation to easily show your son the steps. I hope this helps you in any way.
                        While this may help him understand what you're going for, I've never seen any good evidence that doing this kind of slow motion work will have any transfer to muscle memory.
                        Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                        I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                          While this may help him understand what you're going for, I've never seen any good evidence that doing this kind of slow motion work will have any transfer to muscle memory.
                          I have, so that is what I teach. As an Army instructor I have taught by-the-numbers. However, I understand where you say it might not work for everyone. I feel very confident as an instructer, and this is where I would start.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MD Diamond Sports View Post
                            I have, so that is what I teach. As an Army instructor I have taught by-the-numbers. However, I understand where you say it might not work for everyone. I feel very confident as an instructer, and this is where I would start.
                            While many people advocate this, I've never seen a scientific study that says it's real.

                            That doesn't mean it's not real, but it violates several principles of motor learning.
                            Hitting Coordinator for Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis.

                            I also work with the pitchers who are dealing with injury problems.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have a Masters degree and I understand the validity of soureable content. However, I also understand the concept of whatever works, use it.
                              Last edited by MD Diamond Sports; 01-21-2013, 03:22 AM.

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