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  • Originally posted by glennnphp View Post
    really? you could tell that they knew they'd blown it? from the TV screen you'd never know, with their arms crossed and their chin set high while Bobby's hittin' the tunnel (well, the first five feet of the tunnel, anyway...).

    of course, that begs the question: if the plate ump CLEARLY calls a ball a strike will he try to make up for it on another borderline pitch? i've heard announcers suggest that some would.

    not to digress, tho. i'd like to think the crews review tapes of a game occassionally...
    Yes, MLB umps look at video of their games.

    Yes, they know when they blow a call.

    As an ump, as tough as it is to stick with a call you know you blew, you pretty much must. If you start changing your calls, trust me, unbelieveable chaos will occur. EVERY call that you make, that someone disagrees with, you will get challenged to change it, even if you were right.

    Here's what happens;

    you call a guy out when he was clearly safe and you know it; so you put him back on base.

    Then a close play happens when the OTHER team is at bat and you are correct, but it's close. So, the manager comes out and tells you you were wrong and that you changed the call for the other team, so why won't you change it for him?

    Plus, now you've set yourself up to have every call questioned, AND you've lost respect, because now everybody thinks you can be talked into changing calls. It's simply better to live with the blown call, and focus harder to get all the following calls right, than to change one you know you blew.

    As for making up calls. NEVER, absolutely NOT. That just makes it look like you blew TWO calls instead of one. If you blow two calls and then make them both up, it looks like you missed FOUR calls. You're just doubling how bad you look.

    Umps are taught not to change calls, and not to make up bad calls, and that's how it should be.

    Comment


    • interesting. i've always had more respect for a person (umpire) who is able to admit a mistake and correct it. i'd like to think (maybe unrealistically idealistic) that there's enough integrity in this The Grand Sport on the field that managers like Lou Piniella (sp?) who still need to use 1st grade tactics ("that's not fair!") are not the norm.

      Can an ump not have control of the game even though he's corrected a bad call?

      isn't a means of getting the call right provided? the 'huddle'? Alex Rodriguez hit a ball five feet over the fence in Baltimore the other night that was not called a homer; the umps huddled and corrected it.

      a man slid past second in a Braves game yesterday and was tagged off the base with two outs. he later scored, and Braves lost by one run. The ump was unwilling to ask for help.

      MANY divisions are lost by one game.

      i understand your scenario, that there ARE many Lou Piniellas out there; but it's ultimately the Ump's call, and just because he fixed a bad call before doesn't mean he can't stick to his guns and maintain control of the game, it seems to me. otherwise these means of correcting bad calls wouldn't have been provided.

      I'd be willing to bet that the Commiss. and most others still think that the correct outcome of the game is the penultimate goal, not the Officials' dignity and control.

      as long as the trend continues, the push for Instant Replay will continue to rise. Before we know it, Harry Wendelstedt will be coming back to straighten all this stuff out. Which wouldn't be a bad thing. )
      "Catcher's don't catch hanging sliders, fans do." - Don Sutton

      (after having a line drive rip through the webbing and into right field)...
      Joe Simpson: "The first baseman's going to get a new glove."
      Skip Caray: "Either that or to turn in his resignation."

      Comment


      • Originally posted by glennnphp View Post
        interesting. i've always had more respect for a person (umpire) who is able to admit a mistake and correct it. i'd like to think (maybe unrealistically idealistic) that there's enough integrity in this The Grand Sport on the field that managers like Lou Piniella (sp?) who still need to use 1st grade tactics ("that's not fair!") are not the norm.

        Can an ump not have control of the game even though he's corrected a bad call?

        isn't a means of getting the call right provided? the 'huddle'? Alex Rodriguez hit a ball five feet over the fence in Baltimore the other night that was not called a homer; the umps huddled and corrected it.

        a man slid past second in a Braves game yesterday and was tagged off the base with two outs. he later scored, and Braves lost by one run. The ump was unwilling to ask for help.

        MANY divisions are lost by one game.

        i understand your scenario, that there ARE many Lou Piniellas out there; but it's ultimately the Ump's call, and just because he fixed a bad call before doesn't mean he can't stick to his guns and maintain control of the game, it seems to me. otherwise these means of correcting bad calls wouldn't have been provided.

        I'd be willing to bet that the Commiss. and most others still think that the correct outcome of the game is the penultimate goal, not the Officials' dignity and control.

        as long as the trend continues, the push for Instant Replay will continue to rise. Before we know it, Harry Wendelstedt will be coming back to straighten all this stuff out. Which wouldn't be a bad thing. )
        All I can tell you is that early in my umpiring days (about 26 years ago), I called a runner out going into second base, who was CLEARLY safe, so I changed the call, and I regret it to this day. It was in the third inning, and for the rest of the game, I put up with cr-ap from BOTH teams inning after inning, on almost every play. Even the team who benefitted from the reversal of out to safe, later bitched when I called another of their runners out on a close play, they wanted that one changed too, even though I got that one right. And, the other team kept asking me when I was going to give them a break every time a play was close and they were called out, and they griped when I called the opponent safe on a close play, wanting me to change it to out, in their favor.

        Plus, I had to hear comments like, "Are you sure, Blue? You were wrong before. Come on, change that one", etc, etc.

        I haven't changed a call since then.

        Changing fair/foul or HR or not, type calls is not the same thing. MLB wants the umps to get together on those, but it simply isn't practical or wise, to get together and umpire by committee on out/safe calls.
        Last edited by jbooth; 05-28-2008, 09:20 PM.

        Comment


        • yeah, i hear ya. i guess i can see your point.

          i just watched some guy named Wegner totally ruin the last two at-bats and most certainly influence the outcome of that game. Braves lost by one run in the ninth after jojo reyes pitched a 2 hitter.

          seems like the only people (and this is not a slight on you and your officiating) who care about the umpires' dignity are the umpires. the rest of us want a proper win/loss column total.

          does Kent Hrbek and the 91 World Series ring a bell?

          i guess if poor officiating is to continue, then Instant Replay will save the umpires' dignity and peace.

          no offense. (i'm feeling guilty to want a fair game. damn.)
          "Catcher's don't catch hanging sliders, fans do." - Don Sutton

          (after having a line drive rip through the webbing and into right field)...
          Joe Simpson: "The first baseman's going to get a new glove."
          Skip Caray: "Either that or to turn in his resignation."

          Comment


          • Two Balks To The Same Batter and Neither Called!!

            JB, I think you'll get a real kick out of this one . . . in tournament play this weekend, we were rallying in the bottom of the 5th (7 inning game), when the umpires really botched it for us.

            With one out and runners at 2nd and 3rd, the other team waned to intentionally walk our batter to load the bases and setup the double play. So just as the pitcher comes set, the coach yells to the catcher to "walk him", so the catcher gets ups and moves to the outside of the left batter's box and waits for the pitcher to make his delivery. The pitcher throws and the PU calls "ball one", we holler from the dugout (yeah, I know we should have called time to talk to him) "the catcher has to be in his box before the pitcher delivers the pitch".

            The other coach yells something to his catcher, my batter steps back into the box and the pitcher, without COMING SET OR WINDING UP, delivers the next "pitch" from OFF THE MOUND, in front and to the left of it and the umpire calls "ball two" . . . now I call time and go talk to the BU and he says he "didn't see it", I'm dumbfounded that he could miss it and ask if he would talk to the PU. They conference and the PU turns to us and yells "ball two"; with time still out I walk to the PU and ask him how he's calling it a ball and not a balk when the pitcher delivered a pitch NEVER IN CONTACT WITH THE RUBBER. He tells me, "Coach, it's ball two, now go back to your dugout", I say "wait a minute, where did the pitcher deliver the ball from?", he just repeats his previous orders and refuses to discuss it.

            As you can imagine I'm a bit hot right now and just tell him what a "terrible, pathetic" call he and his partner made. Now this is the same umpire who the previous day made sure he let us know at the plate meeting that he was "a HS umpire and will be calling the game closely and have little tolerance on balks", I knew then and there we were in trouble; I've learned that when they have to tell us their credentials, they're usually not worth a dang.

            Anyway, for the next two pitches the catcher NEVER got back into his box and the intentional walk was granted. So, instead of two balks that would have plated two runs, the bases were loaded and my next batter promptly hit the ball back to the pitcher for a 1-2-3 DP.

            We went on to lose the game 4-5 and needless to say I wasn't at all happy with the officiating for that game. Not that it matters, but the BU had terrible mechanics and missed several other calls during the game (2 against us and one for us) that were just horrendous.

            As we walked to congratulate the other team, it was the first time that a manager ever told me that we "got hosed" in a game. Now we made a couple mistakes, that had we made the plays, would have also changed the outcome, but man those calls were terrible and those non-balk calls were definitely heartbreakers/game changers.

            .
            In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

            Comment


            • this guy Wegner in Milwaukee tonight called a strike well below the knees of Brian McCann who NEVER argues a call (he's usually hitting the damn thing) - he's incenced with the Ump and steps away from the box for a sec and the Ump tells him to get back in the box and tells the pitcher to go ahead, which he does for a no frills strike 2 (all this with 2 outs in the top of the 9th in a 0 - 0 game). needless to say BM strikes out, the Brewers subsequently score and there's little joy in Mudville.

              But by golly the Ump kept control...
              "Catcher's don't catch hanging sliders, fans do." - Don Sutton

              (after having a line drive rip through the webbing and into right field)...
              Joe Simpson: "The first baseman's going to get a new glove."
              Skip Caray: "Either that or to turn in his resignation."

              Comment


              • isn't a means of getting the call right provided? the 'huddle'? Alex Rodriguez hit a ball five feet over the fence in Baltimore the other night that was not called a homer; the umps huddled and corrected it.

                a man slid past second in a Braves game yesterday and was tagged off the base with two outs. he later scored, and Braves lost by one run. The ump was unwilling to ask for help.
                The reason umpires don't "huddle" on every close call is because EACH umpire has a "responsibility" [to a certain part of the field]. A home plate umpire will NEVER over-rule the 2B umpire's call on a play at 2B because there's no way he could possibly have a better view of it. Now, the 3B umpire might have had a better view of the overslide, but again, that is not his "jurisdiction" so to speak. So it's not that he was "unwilling" to ask for help. It's that the play wasn't really something that could be "appealed". It was his call to make/blow. He now must live with that call. And so do the players/coaches/fans.
                That's part of what makes baseball special. If there were no disputable calls, we would have never gotten to see the "grenade toss" from behind the mound, last year.

                Jim, would you say that is a "fair" assessment of the situation "out there"?
                Last edited by StraightGrain11; 05-29-2008, 01:45 AM.
                "Coaches should teach people to play better baseball, not teach baseball to make better players."
                "In the Little League manual it says 'Baseball builds character' - that is not true. Baseball reveals character." - Augie Garrido

                Comment


                • i fully agree - an umpire IS supposed to be responsible, and for the VAST majority of the time, they are. regarding the overslide, for the most part i also have to agree - an ump's jurisdiction is critical, else chaos.

                  so the question is begged, "why is officiating getting worse instead of better?"

                  my point about the huddle is not that it should happen more often (time constraints, responsibilty...) but that in fact, it IS acceptable, even a means provided for, an Umpire to change a call, to 'get it right' - that an Umpire "should never change his call" and that "that's the way it should be" is a concept that, like so many others, has changed over time.

                  the whole reason i was asking about whether Umps review tapes is to discover whether they are in fact, in any way, held responsible for or interested in any way in decreasing what are sometimes DEVASTATING gaffs:

                  Support:
                  (need i mention) Don Denkinger, 1985 World Series and Kansas City Royals' Favorite Son - indisputibly changed the outcome of the WS. the game was OVER.
                  Eric strike-zone-as-wide-as-i-am Gregg, 97 NLCS Game 5 ending punch-out
                  Rich Garcia, '96 ALCS and Jeter's back pocket (it was Game 1, and the Yankees would have won the WS anyway, but STILL - what an effin' GAFF)

                  i hear of many players and managers being held responisible for irresponsible decisions on the field after the fact.

                  i've NEVER heard of bad call even being MENTIONED after the fact, by the crew chief or whomever is responsible for the quality of, or lack thereof, today's Umpires. it's kinda like Diplomatic Immunity.

                  is the MOST that happens being the crew sitting somewhere watching an OBVIOUS blown call on tape and the offender saying "yeah, I blew that one. i'll try to do better..."?

                  if there was some kind of responsibilty AFTER the fact, then some WOULD actually care more about the fairness of the game (that is, after all, why they're there) than about their own pride.

                  "I put up with cr-ap from BOTH teams inning after inning, on almost every play. Even the team who benefitted from the reversal of out to safe, later bitched when I called another of their runners out on a close play, they wanted that one changed too, even though I got that one right. And, the other team kept asking me when I was going to give them a break every time a play was close and they were called out, and they griped when I called the opponent safe on a close play, wanting me to change it to out, in their favor.

                  Plus, I had to hear comments like, "Are you sure, Blue? You were wrong before. Come on, change that one", etc, etc."


                  so i'm hearing that they'd rather not have to hear, put up with, get bitched at, be asked questions about, hear griping --- at the expense of fairness and accuracy that in no doubt COULD affect the outcome of a game, Division, World Series for more than one team.

                  I'm wondering what the Mission of the MLB Umpire is, as defined by such Powers.

                  And before comment is regurgitated on the Control of the game, i think it's pretty apparent that, in the scenario given, a simple "No." (and/or ejection) would have maintained control.

                  "He now must live with that call. And so do the players/coaches/fans."

                  Really. Say that in Baltimore. Tell Jose Offerman and the Red Sox Nation that Tim Tschida's interpretation of "out" (see below) is "part of what makes baseball special".

                  the fact is, people are getting tired of Eric Greggs and Angel Hernandez' just plain not giving a sh** and not being 'encouraged to improve' after the fact.

                  Bet IR would be an encouragement.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by glennnphp; 05-29-2008, 07:55 AM.
                  "Catcher's don't catch hanging sliders, fans do." - Don Sutton

                  (after having a line drive rip through the webbing and into right field)...
                  Joe Simpson: "The first baseman's going to get a new glove."
                  Skip Caray: "Either that or to turn in his resignation."

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by glennnphp View Post
                    i fully agree - an umpire IS supposed to be responsible, and for the VAST majority of the time, they are. regarding the overslide, for the most part i also have to agree - an ump's jurisdiction is critical, else chaos.

                    so the question is begged, "why is officiating getting worse instead of better?"


                    my point about the huddle is not that it should happen more often (time constraints, responsibilty...) but that in fact, it IS acceptable, even a means provided for, an Umpire to change a call, to 'get it right' - that an Umpire "should never change his call" and that "that's the way it should be" is a concept that, like so many others, has changed over time.

                    the whole reason i was asking about whether Umps review tapes is to discover whether they are in fact, in any way, held responsible for or interested in any way in decreasing what are sometimes DEVASTATING gaffs:

                    Support:
                    (need i mention) Don Denkinger, 1985 World Series and Kansas City Royals' Favorite Son - indisputibly changed the outcome of the WS. the game was OVER.
                    Eric strike-zone-as-wide-as-i-am Gregg, 97 NLCS Game 5 ending punch-out
                    Rich Garcia, '96 ALCS and Jeter's back pocket (it was Game 1, and the Yankees would have won the WS anyway, but STILL - what an effin' GAFF)

                    i hear of many players and managers being held responisible for irresponsible decisions on the field after the fact.

                    i've NEVER heard of bad call even being MENTIONED after the fact, by the crew chief or whomever is responsible for the quality of, or lack thereof, today's Umpires. it's kinda like Diplomatic Immunity.

                    is the MOST that happens being the crew sitting somewhere watching an OBVIOUS blown call on tape and the offender saying "yeah, I blew that one. i'll try to do better..."?

                    if there was some kind of responsibilty AFTER the fact, then some WOULD actually care more about the fairness of the game (that is, after all, why they're there) than about their own pride.
                    MLB and the umpire's union have kept tabs on umps' performance for years, and with today's technology they can do a better job of it.

                    It is consistently shown that MLB umpires get about 98 percent of field calls correct and more than 98 percent of balls and strikes correct. That's pretty darn good, and you can't expect them to be 100 percent correct. It's just that you get highly emotional at the one or two out of a hundred that they miss, and especially if it is at a crucial point in the game.

                    Why is it that fans only mildly complain when their team makes several bonehead plays in a game, and then quickly forgive and forget, yet when an ump blows one, they want to kill him, and they remember it forever, and THAT is what cost them the game, not the 3 mental mistakes made by the team, and/or the poor play?

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by glennnphp View Post
                      i've NEVER heard of bad call even being MENTIONED after the fact, by the crew chief or whomever is responsible for the quality of, or lack thereof, today's Umpires. it's kinda like Diplomatic Immunity.
                      Yea, it is. Like you, I don't always agree with that, either.
                      Do you also mean like the call they TOTALLY blew earlier this year, with the big mix up on the basepaths? Where the runner from 2B passed the runner at 3B and they LET HIM GO BACK to 2B??? I know all the guys on ESPN were "complimenting" the officials on a "superb job of getting the call right". Right??? They COMPLETELY BLEW the call. What apparently neither the umpires nor the members of Baseball Tonight understood was that it is the RUNNER'S RESPONSIBILITY to keep track of WHAT HE IS DOING - this includes NOT PASSING the baserunner in front of you - regardless of the play.
                      is the MOST that happens being the crew sitting somewhere watching an OBVIOUS blown call on tape and the offender saying "yeah, I blew that one. i'll try to do better..."?
                      Pretty much.
                      if there was some kind of responsibilty AFTER the fact, then some WOULD actually care more about the fairness of the game (that is, after all, why they're there) than about their own pride.
                      You mean like a "fine" or public appology?
                      Last edited by StraightGrain11; 05-29-2008, 07:58 AM.
                      "Coaches should teach people to play better baseball, not teach baseball to make better players."
                      "In the Little League manual it says 'Baseball builds character' - that is not true. Baseball reveals character." - Augie Garrido

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
                        JB, I think you'll get a real kick out of this one . . . in tournament play this weekend, we were rallying in the bottom of the 5th (7 inning game), when the umpires really botched it for us.

                        With one out and runners at 2nd and 3rd, the other team waned to intentionally walk our batter to load the bases and setup the double play. So just as the pitcher comes set, the coach yells to the catcher to "walk him", so the catcher gets ups and moves to the outside of the left batter's box and waits for the pitcher to make his delivery. The pitcher throws and the PU calls "ball one", we holler from the dugout (yeah, I know we should have called time to talk to him) "the catcher has to be in his box before the pitcher delivers the pitch".

                        The other coach yells something to his catcher, my batter steps back into the box and the pitcher, without COMING SET OR WINDING UP, delivers the next "pitch" from OFF THE MOUND, in front and to the left of it and the umpire calls "ball two" . . . now I call time and go talk to the BU and he says he "didn't see it", I'm dumbfounded that he could miss it and ask if he would talk to the PU. They conference and the PU turns to us and yells "ball two"; with time still out I walk to the PU and ask him how he's calling it a ball and not a balk when the pitcher delivered a pitch NEVER IN CONTACT WITH THE RUBBER. He tells me, "Coach, it's ball two, now go back to your dugout", I say "wait a minute, where did the pitcher deliver the ball from?", he just repeats his previous orders and refuses to discuss it.

                        As you can imagine I'm a bit hot right now and just tell him what a "terrible, pathetic" call he and his partner made. Now this is the same umpire who the previous day made sure he let us know at the plate meeting that he was "a HS umpire and will be calling the game closely and have little tolerance on balks", I knew then and there we were in trouble; I've learned that when they have to tell us their credentials, they're usually not worth a dang.

                        Anyway, for the next two pitches the catcher NEVER got back into his box and the intentional walk was granted. So, instead of two balks that would have plated two runs, the bases were loaded and my next batter promptly hit the ball back to the pitcher for a 1-2-3 DP.

                        We went on to lose the game 4-5 and needless to say I wasn't at all happy with the officiating for that game. Not that it matters, but the BU had terrible mechanics and missed several other calls during the game (2 against us and one for us) that were just horrendous.

                        As we walked to congratulate the other team, it was the first time that a manager ever told me that we "got hosed" in a game. Now we made a couple mistakes, that had we made the plays, would have also changed the outcome, but man those calls were terrible and those non-balk calls were definitely heartbreakers/game changers.

                        .
                        MLB umps and most amateur umps haven't enforced the rule that keeps the catcher in the box on an intentional walk for about 20 years.

                        Umps are in a no-win situation. If I enforce that rule the defense will scream that it's a horse pucky call, and that nobody else has called that rule on them in the last 3 years, etc, etc, and if I don't call it, the offense wants it called, even though his catcher probably has done the same thing before, and he would have a fit if I called it on him.

                        Be honest, you were grasping at straws to get a call, that you never usually think about.

                        I'm just guessing here, but the ump probably did what he did, and treated you the way he did, because you were asking him to make what most people think is a horse sh** call. He then ignored the pitch from off the rubber because it is related to your griping over nothing.

                        I'm not condoning that, but trust me, many umps will get back at you when you start nit-picking stuff that everybody knows, is never called. I never do that, but I know guys who like to do what is called the F U call.

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                        • Originally posted by jbooth View Post
                          It is consistently shown that MLB umpires get about 98 percent of field calls correct and more than 98 percent of balls and strikes correct. That's pretty darn good, and you can't expect them to be 100 percent correct. It's just that you get highly emotional at the one or two out of a hundred that they miss, and especially if it is at a crucial point in the game.
                          This is true. Umpires, have the best "track record"/performance of ANY group of officials in any sport (and they don't need "instant replay" to do this, either - all the more amazing). So, we really don't have that much to complain about, now do we?
                          "Coaches should teach people to play better baseball, not teach baseball to make better players."
                          "In the Little League manual it says 'Baseball builds character' - that is not true. Baseball reveals character." - Augie Garrido

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by jbooth View Post
                            MLB and the umpire's union have kept tabs on umps' performance for years, and with today's technology they can do a better job of it.

                            It is consistently shown that MLB umpires get about 98 percent of field calls correct and more than 98 percent of balls and strikes correct. That's pretty darn good, and you can't expect them to be 100 percent correct. It's just that you get highly emotional at the one or two out of a hundred that they miss, and especially if it is at a crucial point in the game.

                            Why is it that fans only mildly complain when their team makes several bonehead plays in a game, and then quickly forgive and forget, yet when an ump blows one, they want to kill him, and they remember it forever, and THAT is what cost them the game, not the 3 mental mistakes made by the team, and/or the poor play?
                            yes, but that 2% carries with it potentially season influencing repercussions. that 2% could be more closely monitored and CORRECTED with 'Today's Technology" and/or...

                            Yes, since pride in a job well done isn't effetive, a fine, acknowledgment or threat to their position would be a good start.

                            OK. i don't mean to badger JB here. i'm through. i apolgize. I believe OUR point's been made to those objective enough.

                            The Purity of the game rests in the Participators affecting it's outcome, not the Officials. THAT is tradition.
                            "Catcher's don't catch hanging sliders, fans do." - Don Sutton

                            (after having a line drive rip through the webbing and into right field)...
                            Joe Simpson: "The first baseman's going to get a new glove."
                            Skip Caray: "Either that or to turn in his resignation."

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by jbooth View Post
                              MLB umps and most amateur umps haven't enforced the rule that keeps the catcher in the box on an intentional walk for about 20 years.

                              Umps are in a no-win situation. If I enforce that rule the defense will scream that it's a horse pucky call, and that nobody else has called that rule on them in the last 3 years, etc, etc, and if I don't call it, the offense wants it called, even though his catcher probably has done the same thing before, and he would have a fit if I called it on him.

                              Be honest, you were grasping at straws to get a call, that you never usually think about.

                              I'm just guessing here, but the ump probably did what he did, and treated you the way he did, because you were asking him to make what most people think is a horse sh** call. He then ignored the pitch from off the rubber because it is related to your griping over nothing.

                              I'm not condoning that, but trust me, many umps will get back at you when you start nit-picking stuff that everybody knows, is never called. I never do that, but I know guys who like to do what is called the F U call.
                              Jim, if you re-read his statement, I think you will find he is not complaining about the "catcher's box balk", he was complaining that the PITCHER wasn't even in CONTACT with the RUBBER when he delivered the pitch (nor had he come "set").
                              "Coaches should teach people to play better baseball, not teach baseball to make better players."
                              "In the Little League manual it says 'Baseball builds character' - that is not true. Baseball reveals character." - Augie Garrido

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by StraightGrain11 View Post
                                Jim, if you re-read his statement, I think you will find he is not complaining about the "catcher's box balk", he was complaining that the PITCHER wasn't even in CONTACT with the RUBBER when he delivered the pitch (nor had he come "set").
                                I know, but he was pitching an intentional walk, and I think the ump was pissed off from the previous complaint about where the catcher was.

                                I'm not saying that he shouldn't have called the balk for pitching from off the rubber, I'm saying that he may truly not have seen it, or maybe he did, and just decided it wasn't important on an intentional walk pitch. I'm not agreeing with what the ump did, I'm just trying to give some possible explanation for his actions.

                                I think the ump probably had the attitude that, "they're walking the guy, geez in HS you don't even have to throw 4 pitches, you just tell the ump to send him to first." So, he probably was not going to make what he considered nit-picky calls on an intentional walk.

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