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  • #16
    Originally posted by Roothog66 View Post
    Never noticed before, but Daniels has pretty good mechanics here. Good hip/shoulder separation. Good upperbody rotation and decent pivot foot follow through. Nice velocity, as well.
    maybe it's the uneven surface and camera angle but isn't there a little inverted W thing going on? =)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by bbrages View Post
      IMO - if your swing mechanics are right, you're not going to be able to avoid getting hit once in awhile, especially if you're facing decent speed. Learn safe techniques to take the pitch or dodge it when possible.

      I got one bone to pick here, though: the proper technique is to turn inwards towards the plate, allowing the pitch to hit your back side, not to "spin away" and expose the front. Plus the inward turn goes well with "coiling while striding". Am I wrong here?
      By spin away I actually meant turning the shoulders in the opposite direction they're turning during a swing.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dude Paskert View Post
        The whole scene with Harry and Mary Swanson skiing and playing in the snow was one of the funniest I've seen in a movie. When he grabs her by the back of the head and mashes her face in the snow with his full weight on her...I just HOWL.
        I'll bet I've watched that movie or large portions of it 50 times. If it's on, I can't stop watching it...hilarious!! It's the bathroom scene for me though.."what are you doing in there"? "Uhhh..shaving"!! :bowdown:

        He does look pretty smooth in his delivery doesn't he Root!!
        Ty Cobb-"Every great batter works on the theory that the pitcher is more afraid of him than he is of the pitcher."

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        • #19
          I think everyone's on the same page here as to whether and how to plunk kids, and I agree. As a lawyer, I gotta give props to Coach T13's advance warning to parents that he'll plunk their kid to avoid a later tantrum stemming from a misunderstanding.

          Three supplemental thoughts:

          First, it helps to reassure kids that they can get out of the way of most pitches; I've said, "Look, there's absolutely no one with faster reaction time than [insert age of kids] year olds; I've seen you play Halo and if you can drop an Elite and three Brutes in a half a second, you can take the time to see where the pitch is before bailing."

          Second, point out to kids that getting back on their heels in an unathletic position will make it tougher for them to get out of the way of a pitch if they need to. They need to keep their weight on the balls of their feet.

          Third, a cue taught by a kid coach and former MLB player around here is that - if you have to avoid a pitch - you should "duck out the back door". This helps visualize the necessity of turning the head and dropping it.

          Originally posted by mys View Post
          maybe it's the uneven surface and camera angle but isn't there a little inverted W thing going on? =)
          I think he's fine - as it's largely the uphill slope:

          DumberSnow.jpg

          While I'd prefer to see a longer stride, I do like his glove tuck.

          This brings to mind an obvious question: is this the sort of drill that you New Englanders should have been working on with snowballs over the past three months? That is until you have this exchange:

          Mom/wife: "What are you doing to our son?"
          Dad/Husband-destined-for-a-night-on-the-couch: "I'm eradicating his fear of getting hit by a pitch and teaching him to avoid inside pitches by throwing snowballs at him."
          Mom: "You are a sick, obsessed man. Everything is not about baseball."

          And for extra demerits, add: "But pitchers and catchers have already reported!"
          sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

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          • #20
            And for extra demerits, add: "But pitchers and catchers have already reported!"
            ...and California, Texas and Florida kids are already a third of the way through their seasons.

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            • #21
              I've never intentionally done it during BP. Within the 1st 3 practices every season I do line everyone up with bats along the fence closest to where the parents are and hit them. Regular baseballs underhanded hard enough there's not an arch to the ball from 10' or so. Everyone gets 2 but no more than 3 as long as they're turning and letting the bat slide thru their hands.

              I do think continually hitting someone at 80+mph is a bit extreme but bringing charges against someone is another example of the wuss-i-facation of America. I assume no one does pegs for outs on tennis ball pickup games anymore.
              Never ignore in victory what you would not ignore in defeat

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Ursa Major View Post

                Mom/wife: "What are you doing to our son?"
                Dad/Husband-destined-for-a-night-on-the-couch: "I'm eradicating his fear of getting hit by a pitch and teaching him to avoid inside pitches by throwing snowballs at him."
                Mom: "You are a sick, obsessed man. Everything is not about baseball."
                Dad/husband, with quizzical look on his face: "Uh, yes it is.."
                "That ball got outta here in a hurry.. Ya know.. anything that travels that far ought to have a damned stewardess on it, don't ya think?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tman View Post
                  The only problem with that- and it's arguable whether it should be a concern in younger age groups- is the possibility they may not learn to spin away properly from a fastball they can't get out of the way of.
                  I teach them to spin with their back to the ball while getting out of the way. That's a lot different than spin and take it. I've never wanted a kid to be on base bad enough to have him get hit by a baseball to get there. Now if a kid just turns his head and hops strait back I don't worry about it too much but we still work on spinning. I've found by 12 or 13 most kids start spinning and taking it on their own and it never has to be pushed when they get older.
                  Bad habits: If you are allowing them you are coaching them.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by omg View Post
                    The safest way to not get hit is to turn inwardly away from the ball because if they get hit in the front it could cause an injury to the gronoidal region and cause swelling in the gronoids. If they turn the other way they end up jumping up around like a little _______, just like Evander Holyfield after Mike gave him a little nip on the ear.

                    "Pitch avoidance" practice is often one of my favorite parts of practice. We usually assign the hobbyists to get extra work on this drill so that they may receive some special attention from me, see how skillful they really think they are. They are under the impression that tennis balls don't hurt.
                    The safest way to NOT get hit is to step backward. The safest way TO get hit is to turn your back. It teach both together.
                    Bad habits: If you are allowing them you are coaching them.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Scotty83 View Post
                      I teach them to spin with their back to the ball while getting out of the way. That's a lot different than spin and take it. I've never wanted a kid to be on base bad enough to have him get hit by a baseball to get there. Now if a kid just turns his head and hops strait back I don't worry about it too much but we still work on spinning. I've found by 12 or 13 most kids start spinning and taking it on their own and it never has to be pushed when they get older.
                      That's more along the lines of what I actually try to get kids to do.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by smhorton View Post
                        Mom/wife: "What are you doing to our son?"
                        Dad/Husband-destined-for-a-night-on-the-couch: "I'm eradicating his fear of getting hit by a pitch and teaching him to avoid inside pitches by throwing snowballs at him."
                        Mom: "You are a sick, obsessed man. Everything is not about baseball."
                        Dad/husband, with quizzical look on his face: "Uh, yes it is.."
                        That's a two-night stay on the couch.

                        Now, of the three t-shirts below, if the wife gives you #1 for Christmas, maybe she has a sense of humor about it. If she gives #2 to herself, you're probably dealing with some issues. And if she gives out #3 to one of your other kids, then you've definitely got some resentment going on. (And if that kid asks for Tshirt #3, you're destined to have the kid complaining about you on Maury in a couple of years.)

                        BaseballLifeCollage.jpg
                        sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

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                        • #27
                          a tightly packed rolled up sock works very well mixed in the bucket. I usually throw one after a kid rockets one off the screen's crossbar and is feeling "in the zone" give a little old school flavor to our bp sessions. I stopped doing it for a white last fall because my sock unraveled and the kids made me bring it back. The sock or the squishy ball are better than T balls because you can let them fly. The balls that do injure are the ones that get overthrown so there is little time to rely on anything more than instinct. My son took one on the spine last season, the imprint of the ball was clear as day. He didn't miss an inning. I can't imagine the damage it would have done if he turned inward. The key to getting hit by a pitch is to time your spin so you are moving when the ball hits you, that way there is more chance the blow will be glancing instead of dead on.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by heretolearn View Post
                            I do it with wiffle balls and the softer level 5 ball. Nothing full speed with the level 5, just enough for their instinct to be correct instead of trying to catch it with their hands or just standing there.

                            I have also mixed wiffle balls with regular balls and intentionally thrown the wiffle balls at the player to see their reaction.
                            I've got 7- and 8-year-olds who face kid pitch. Last year, I was the coach who didn't drill because I worried I'd get them scared before even their first at-bat. I don't think that was the right approach. Now, I drill them on the turn, and "pelt" them with tennis balls (the slightly over-sized, hollower ones for little kids).

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Scotty83 View Post
                              The safest way to NOT get hit is to step backward. The safest way TO get hit is to turn your back. It teach both together.
                              You're right, I guess, but it doesn't really go hand in hand with good, balanced aggressive hitting- or do you think that it does? I don't think that when a batter is turning inward he isn't necessarily trying to get hit safely but he is mainly trying to avoid getting hit and if he does get hit it decrease the odds of injury/pain. Which are they supposed to step back with, the front or the back? I guess if the pitching is real slow a hitter could easily get out of the way by stepping back but do you this also applies to fast pitching? A guy who steps back, I'm thinking he has a head start going that way to begin with.
                              Major Figure/Internet Influencer

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                              • #30
                                I know I'm late here. I was just looking for info to teach my 5 YO and came across this thread.

                                This instantly brought me back to my first HBP. I watched baseball as a kid and knew getting hit was a part of the game, but I never expected to get hit...and I was fearless on the diamond. I was three years into the game and I had avoided an HBP.

                                I was 10 at the time, our leadoff hitter and I still remember it vividly. An 1-0 fastball aimed right at my left thigh...I tried to put my hand up to block it and boy that was dumb! Nicked my finger and hurt like hell. Now dinged on my finger and thigh. Although I got a nasty black and blue bruise from that AB, what I remember most was how angry I was. I stared down the pitcher all way to first and literally wanted to charge the mound.

                                I can honestly say I was not prepared mentally for an HBP at the time. Instinctively I tried to block it, but should have rolled away...which I began doing afterwards.

                                My second HBP came later that year against the hardest thrower in the league...that one landed on my ankle during a scrimmage against the second best team who we beat in the Championship the previous year. What I remember most about this HBP was how the HBP affected the pitcher also. I was hobbling for a week, but it affected him mentally and he refused to throw that hard again for the rest of the year. We faced off in the Championship again, and they weren't the same without their Ace. We soundly beat them that year...my brother who pitched for them didn't speak to me for days. LOL
                                "After my fourth season I asked for $43,000 and General Manager Ed Barrow told me, 'Young man, do you realize Lou Gehrig, a 16-year-man, is playing for only $44,000?' I said, Mr. Barrow, there is only one answer to that - Mr. Gehrig is terribly underpaid."- Yankees outfielder Joe DiMaggio

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